Black Shim Brass Anchor www.shipsofscale.com Ships Rigging

Model Shipways
Sultana Colonial Schooner Build Log

Page 1





Country Flags


Calendar Icon

May 18, 2006

Model Shipways - Sultana Colonial Schooner - Solid Hull Kit

Built by Benjamin Hollowell in Boston in 1767, Sultana was seaworthy far beyond her size of 51 feet. The Royal Navy bought her in 1768, and she became one of Britain´s most effective weapons in the fight against smugglers.

The Sultana comes with a machine carved basswood hull that requires a little light shaping and sanding. This kit also has other wooden parts, including a ship´s boat, which is laser cut for a perfect fit. Plank-scored decking, spars, wood materials and eight cast metal swivel guns are all included. For historical accuracy, original rigging is duplicated with cotton cordage and 67 wooden blocks. Detailed plans by Ben Lankford and a 24 page instruction manual help you build an authentic replica.

This is an Entry Level Kit

Length 17 inches Height 15 inches Scale 3/16 inches = 1 ft. (1:64)

Ok, so this is going to be very obvious to some and to others it may not be so apparent. There might be some here that have never tackled a wooden ship model before. I can only say that I have had a "taste" of it, but no completions. Wooden Ships will go together will a different type of personality if you will. There are a lot of differences that go beyond the scope of this posting that I am making now. Depending on the complexity of the wooden ship depends on how much "building" is done not "putting together".
This is why I choose the Sultana is that is has a combination of "putting together" and "building". And for heavens sake I certainly hope that I do not come across any certain way by describing "putting together" and "building" as both applies to making a model. I am sure however, that some will contest my witting and my attempt to help. My time is limited right now, so I am in a bind to be less wordy about it at the moment. Now, The discussion at this moment for this build is about Adhesives I done some research about what kind of glue to use with wooden ships. Like I said, bear with me. I have found that if you use Cynoacrylate or CA (super glue) then that is ok, but one thing that some needs to think about is this: If you plan to finish your Sultana with like a natural stain or whatever (instead of painting colors), you might find that the CA glues will not allow your stain to get thru, but will "block" that stain.

If you want to stain naturally your ship, you might want to consider using some products like Titebond original, regular Carpenters Glue and or a product called Weldbond. These later glues allow for stains to be applied and they are also "sandable" whereas the CA glues will dry on the surface hard and maybe crusty depending on your expertise of applications. I am going to go with a variety of CA and some locally bought Titebond from Lowes. I think the Titebond will dry fast enough for what I want to do. My ambition here is not to get carried away with Adhesives, but just to put some thoughts out there for this project coming up. I am not going to go with a stain per say, but I think the mast might have a stain look to it. I will use the Titebond or something similar with that as it will not hinder the looks of the mast or yards. But on parts that will be hidden, then the CA will do fine. There are also some applicator tips that you can use to make sure that too much CA is not being used. I tend to be a little allergic for some reason of the CA. I found that ZAP makes a non-odor variety or non-allergic. It does cost more, but it actually works (no allergic reaction no odors).






Calendar Icon

May 25, 2006

I thought I would try my best at informing everyone about the colors that I ordered as part of the package. The Model Shipways part number is MS2016 which includes 9 bottles of paint. It is actually eight colors (the 9th bottle is an extra Primer - you have two bottles of Primer).

Ok, so I tried my hand using my paint program to duplicate those colors the best that I could. Now, the deal is that I know that everyone is going to have their Computer Monitor set up a slight different. But, at least we have some type of representation of what is going on here with the paint. The paint is also 100% Acrylic Paint that comes 1 oz in a nice glass bottle. The bottles are rather larger than I would have thought. Handles nicely in the hands. Dilute with water.

So here goes the color scheme (please remember this is the best match I could get).

MS4802 Bulwarks Red MS4803 Hull Tallow MS4828 Iron Cannon Black MS4829 Hull Yellow Ochre

MS4802
Bulwarks Red

MS4803
Hull Tallow

MS4828
Iron Cannon Black

MS4829
Hull Yellow Ochre

MS4830 Hull Spar Black MS4831 White MS4836 Bright Green Trim MS4839 Primer

MS4830
Hull Spar Black

MS4831
White

MS4836
Bright Green Trim

MS4839
Primer







Calendar Icon

May 31, 2006

Tonight I have settled down and decided to get the manual out for a good intro reading and seeing what this ship is all about. I was wondering if any of you have done the same? I must admit that in reading the first few pages in "shaping the hull", I am either slightly confused or something. I don´t want to hop ahead of anyone because I think that we have one modeler left that will be getting theirs in shortly. What is every bodies impression of the kit so far of those that have it in hand? I noticed that at the beginning of reading that it says that there are different ways to make the hull and they do leave it to a modelers experience and decisions about how to do the hull. I must say that I hate making decisions like this Confused - now I don´t know if I want to plank it or just build it from plans or what the heck to do. I would like to get some opinions and advise. This is going to be interesting because I don´t think that any two Sultanas are going to be the same Make a Toast.






Calendar Icon

June 02, 2006

I hope I don´t get thrown over-board for this, but I also noticed that http://www.micromark.com has some rigging line. I have not scrutinized it, but it is at least an effort to go to the site and see. If you go to the search and type in rigging, it will come up with various rigging thread. Also, I personally have found that just about any hobby store will have Bead making materials and for instance Hobby Lobby has hundreds and hundreds of various lines and threading. I know that this is not what everybody is looking for, but I found my stuff in the Jewelry making section. I am not an expert on rigging line, but I have come up with some ideas just by looking in the most unthoughtful of places.






Calendar Icon

June 11, 2006

BODY

Hull 01

Hull 01


Hull 02

Hull 02







Calendar Icon

June 11, 2006

Be aware that the Profile template seems to be off about 1/16¨ in lenght. (too long about 1/16?). I think that someone made mention that due to repeatedly copying that is causing the template to be off just a bit.






Calendar Icon

June 11, 2006

Well, this is a technique that worked for me on aft of the ship in doing the transom. I used a small block of 3/8¨ sqaure at the aft keel to keep alignment in order. My left hand is stationary to hold the small block tight against the keel, then the longer 3/8¨ piece that has the sandpaper is going up and down motion to sand the angle. The small block is a guide so that the upper transom piece will have the correct angle to it. So far it is working out. I used a 1/2¨ dowel about 2¨ long with sand paper wrapped around it to get that curve. I done this without carving anything on the transom piece! The sandpaper is #100 so it is cutting threw pretty good.

Hull 03

Hull 03







Calendar Icon

June 15, 2006

Well, I haven#180;t heard from anyone lately, so I don´t know if that is a good sign or if everybody is scratching their heads! For me, I am sanding and staring at the plans trying to decide whats next. I have only "profiled" the hull and marked the center lines. thats it! I made a small error and sanded just a tad too much on the transom, but that was easily repaired. I am now on to trying to mark the other templates onto the side of the hull. I personally have stopped myself several times with almost making several mistakes. As they say - measure twice, cut once. But with me, I am measuring 3 to 5 times and cutting. Unless someone else is different, it is so easy to make a mistake on the hull carving.






Calendar Icon

June 16,2006

Go slowly as it is easy to carve too much before you realize it. I hope to start carving on the hull this evening. I decided to go ahead and remove my bulwarks and I am glad that I did - it does seem to make things easier, however, everyone should feel free to express their modeling taste. Also, marking the center lines can be tricky too. I bought me a center ruler or a zero center ruler. Very nifty item I must say.






Calendar Icon

June 20, 2006

I make jigs not so much that I enjoy doing so, but I do it because it helps me figure things out better. It is not for everyone, and also, you can be welcome to copy any ideas that I come up with. I am sure that this goes way beyond anyone that cares to get this involved in trying to find the "center" on anything. Actually, I am not being perfectionist about this. I am engineering minded so my heart follows with the gadgets and jigs to help me do things better. At any rate, I do not want to become long winded as there are people that have other ideas that would suffice them. I made for lack of better description, a trellis as you see here to help facilitate many things. It has helped me so far in a lot of measuring. The trellis are glued with regular Titebond - no nails. I used a machinist square to make sure they are square. The other stick across the top is a feabled attempt to make a "center" ruler before I actually found one in a store. I used this jig to help me find center across the whole keel.
As far as the deck or top of the ship, I used plain dividers as the photo describes in itself. Ok, now, I found that my hull out of the box was not centered. I found that the Keel Center Line was (ok at the stern keel but off about 3/32¨ or a little more at the bow of the keel). sorry about my lack of nautical terms. (forward Keel "off" aft Keel "ok")
How did I find this out - I am trying to remember !
It seems that I had the ship in vise with deck up as I was looking down on the deck. I took the pair of dividers and I measured the "center" at 3 places. The 3 places were the 3 deck steps. Aft Step, Midship Step and fore Step. Again, I plead forgiveness of my lack of nautique. I marked the Center Line with a mechanical pencil. I then turned the ship over with the Keel facing upwards. It seems to me that I took some sanding paper wrapped around a 3/8¨ square stick and I started to lightly sand along the whole keel until I started to notice a good visible flatness of the keel. I think I measured a 4mm width and maintained that while allowing for the sanding to find the "natural" center by sanding. This worked for me, but I did have that 3/32¨ offset at the bow. However, let me say that after I drew my line down the center of the Keel , I noticed that the Center Line of the Top of the Deck LINED up with the Center Line of the Keel. So with that, I figured that by sanding the keel edge first, it sorta found its natural center. I am not sure if I am explaining myself here or not. Maybe I got lucky, who knows. Let me say it this way. Straight out of the box, I measured the Center Line on the deck. I turned the Ship over, and did not measure anything, but started sanding the keels edge. By sanding the Keels edge, the center of the Keel became more prominent and exposed enough. Then I could mark and measure the center line of the Keel from aft to fore.

Hull 04

Hull 04


Hull 05

Hull 05


Hull 06

Hull 06


Hull 07

Hull 07


Hull 08

Hull 08






Next