No ropes.

Pat71

Active Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
192
Points
43

#1
Are there kits out there that you can built without the whole roper work? Or are there some People that are building kits and leave alle the ropes away? ( no rigging ). Ik know its about 35%of the beauty of the ship.
 

dj56

Active Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
128
Points
43

#2
Pat i think that a ship without rope is a bit like a woman without clothes, they need them all according to my modest opinion
 

Uwek

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
1,383
Points
113

Location
Vienna, Austria
#4
Are there kits out there that you can built without the whole roper work? Or are there some People that are building kits and leave alle the ropes away? ( no rigging ). Ik know its about 35%of the beauty of the ship.
First of all..... @dj56 : Some women without clothes are also interesting.....
@Pat71 : I guess you mean the rigging of a sailing ship, or?
I never saw a model without the rigging, or only unfinished ones......technically you need the standing rigging, that the masts will be stabile and the running rigging, to move the yards and sails, so technically a historic sailing ship needs rigging.
Nevertheless there are the so called Navy Board Models which are often represented without rigging, but also without the masts and yards.
This special style of ship model building was developed in England during first part of the 17th century.
This style is alternatively called Admiralty models, Dockyard models, or Navy Board models.
The shipwrights and ship designers used this way to explain the board the construction specialities of a certain class or a special ship. I guess, that these guys from the board couldn´t read the drawings, so they needed the models to get convinced. In the National Maritime Museum in UK more or less all historic contmeporary models still exist, so we knoa a lot of the old construction methods.....At these models often no masts and rigging was installed.

Look f.e. at this Book review:
Navy Board Ship Models, 1650 - 1750
 

shipbuilder

Active Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
420
Points
43

Location
Great Britain
#9
If you prefer sailing ships, you are stuck with rigging, unless you leave them half-completed. Personally, I find the rigging is far easier than making the hull, espcially when using wire, and having no knots anywhere, just gluing it on in short lengths. Also, small ones are much quicker and easier to build than large ones.
Bob
Kaisow  1868 Tea clipper.JPG
 

Pat71

Active Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
192
Points
43

#10
Think i have to live with it. Is it easyer to do rigging first and all the sails after?
 

shipbuilder

Active Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
420
Points
43

Location
Great Britain
#11
Well, I couldn't do it on any scale! I would find fitting sails to a ship where the rigging is complete, impossible. I do some rigging, then some sails, more rigging, and more sails until they are complete. This is a ship partially rigged and as you can see, I haven't even put the second mast in at this stage. Bob
114 (Large).JPG
 

Donnie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
1,994
Points
83

Location
Madison, MS
#13
Well, yes, there are model ships that are built with NO rigging at all. The Mast are not installed. The ship is basically displayed as a Navy Board Model type. In this situation, just the hull is only needed and built. This approach is legitament and is practiced from time to time.
 

shipbuilder

Active Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
420
Points
43

Location
Great Britain
#14
The actual rigging is far easier than building the hull, especially when it comes to Napoleonic warships. Although rigging is easy, it can be extremely tedious and time-consuming when using twine and knots. If you can build the hull, you will be able to rig it (unless you convince yourself that you can't before you try)
Bob
 

Pat71

Active Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
192
Points
43

#15
I have bad bones because of several diseases. Take about 24 pills a day.Hurt every Day. When i Do the rigging my neck and head hurt with in 20 minutes. The pain comes trough the morfine and other painkillers i use daily. Working with wood goes better with all my electrical tools. So i am looking for a solutionfor the rigging to make it easyer.
 

Uwek

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
1,383
Points
113

Location
Vienna, Austria
#16
I have bad bones because of several diseases. Take about 24 pills a day.Hurt every Day. When i Do the rigging my neck and head hurt with in 20 minutes. The pain comes trough the morfine and other painkillers i use daily. Working with wood goes better with all my electrical tools. So i am looking for a solutionfor the rigging to make it easyer.
Sad to hear. Than you should think about to build f.e. Section models or these mentioned navy board models without masts etc.
this brings also a lot of fun and is relaxing, because you have 99% work with timber.....think about it
 

shipbuilder

Active Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
420
Points
43

Location
Great Britain
#17
Also sorry to hear that. I find tying knots too stressful and time-consuming, and that is why I rig in wire, just glued on. It takes about ten seconds to put a backstay on! Image wire rigging (Large).JPG shows me picking up a piece of rigging ready to place it in position after dipping each end in glue - nothing easier! Bob
 

Pat71

Active Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2017
Messages
192
Points
43

#18
Ik will give it a try with glue. I like the old ships to much. My heart beats faster when i see them in movies like blacksails or master and commander with master russel
 

shipbuilder

Active Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
420
Points
43

Location
Great Britain
#19
Stretch the wire slightly with two small pairs of pliers. It will not spring back like an elastic band when released. Pick it up in middle with tweezers as shown, dip each end in glue, and place it in position. I got the curve on it by gently stroking finger and thumb along it, whilst holding the end with tweezers. The greater the pressure, the greater the curve. You cannot get natural curves like this with twine. The other piece has been left straight!
Bob
 
Top