Naval/Maritime History 16th of June - Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

9th of June

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events




1667 – The Raid on the Medway, during the Second Anglo-Dutch War in June 1667, was a successful attack conducted by the Dutch navy on English battleships laid up in the fleet anchorages off Chatham Dockyard and Gillingham in the county of Kent.
It lasts for five days and results in the worst ever defeat of the Royal Navy.

The Raid on the Medway, during the Second Anglo-Dutch War in June 1667, was a successful attack conducted by the Dutch navy on English battleships laid up in the fleet anchorages off Chatham Dockyard and Gillingham in the county of Kent. At the time, the fortress of Upnor Castle and a barrier chain called the "Gillingham Line" were supposed to protect the English ships.
The Dutch, under nominal command of Willem Joseph van Ghent and Lieutenant-Admiral Michiel de Ruyter, over several days bombarded and captured the town of Sheerness, sailed up the Thames estuary to Gravesend, then sailed into the River Medway to Chatham and Gillingham, where they engaged fortifications with cannon fire, burned or captured three capital ships and ten more ships of the line, and captured and towed away the flagship of the English fleet, HMS Royal Charles.
Politically, the raid was disastrous for King Charles' war plans and led to a quick end to the war and a favourable peace for the Dutch. It was one of the worst defeats in the Royal Navy's history, and one of the worst suffered by the British military. Horace George Franks called it the "most serious defeat it has ever had in its home waters."
Van_Soest,_Attack_on_the_Medway.jpg

Attack on the Medway, June 1667, by Van Soest

The_Dutch_burn_English_ships_during_the_expedition_to_Chatham_(Raid_on_Medway,_1667)(Jan_van_L...jpg

"Burning English ships" by Jan van Leyden. Shown are the events near Gillingham: in the middle Royal Charles is taken; on the right Pro Patria and Schiedam set Matthias and Charles V alight

pw4520.jpg

Dutch in the Medway. Capture of the Royal Charles June 1667 (PAF4520)

Royal_Charles_stern_piece.jpg

Royal Charles stern piece at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam

d2004_1.jpg

Scale: 1:48. Full hull model made in the Navy Board style, thought to be the 'Naseby' (1655), an 80-86 gun ship, three-decker ship of the line.


1753 – Launch of French Algonquin, a 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. She was launched from Québec City in (New France), on 9 June 1753 and placed into service on 8 January 1754.
In 1755, she was placed into service for the transportation of nine companies of the régiment de la Reine who embarked in Brest on 14 April 1755. The 74-gun ship was armed en flûte with 24 guns to allow for more room for the soldiers. The ship was commanded by Captain Jean Baptiste François de La Villéon. The regiment was also reduced to 360 soldiers. Algonquin was part of the naval squadron that left for Canada. She became separated from the other ships after the departure on 29 May, because of heavy fog at sea.
Vaisseau_en_construction_à_Quebec_au_XVIIIeme_siecle.jpg



1772 - HMS Gaspee schooner, Lt. William Dudingston, burned at Namquid Point, Narragansett Bay by American colonists from Providence, Rhode Island.
The Gaspee Affair was a significant event in the lead-up to the American Revolution. HMS Gaspee[1] was a British customs schooner that had been enforcing the Navigation Acts in and around Newport, Rhode Islandin 1772. It ran aground in shallow water while chasing the packet ship Hannah on June 9 near Gaspee Point in Warwick, Rhode Island. A group of men led by Abraham Whipple and John Brown attacked, boarded, and torched the ship.
The event increased hostilities between the American colonists and British officials, following the Boston Massacre in 1770. British officials in Rhode Island wanted to increase their control over trade—legitimate trade as well as smuggling—in order to increase their revenue from the small colony. But Rhode Islanders increasingly protested the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, and other British impositions that had clashed with the colony's history of rum manufacturing, maritime trade, and slave trading.
This event and others in Narragansett Bay marked the first acts of violent uprising against the British crown's authority in America, preceding the Boston Tea Party by more than a year and moving the Thirteen Coloniesas a whole toward the war for independence.
800px-Gaspee_Affair.jpg



1796 - HMS Southampton (32), Cptn. James Macnamara, cut out French corvette Utile (24) from Hyeres Bay
Utile was a gabarre of the French Royal Navy, launched in 1784. The British captured her in the Mediterranean in 1796 and she served briefly there before being laid up in 1797 and sold in 1798.
A typical Gabare like the Utile was the Le Gros Ventre, monographie available by ancre
monographie-du-gros-ventre-gabare-du-roi-1766.jpg



1799 - Boats of HMS Success (32), Cptn. Shuldham Peard, cut out Belle Aurore.
In May 1799 Captain Shuldham Peard took command of Success, and was sent to serve in the Mediterranean. On 9 June of that year, Success was off Cap de Creus, when Peard spotted a polacca to the north-west. He gave chase, but the vessel took refuge in the harbour of El Port de la Selva, so he sent in his boats to cut her out. After a fierce action, in which Success suffered three killed and nine badly wounded, she proved to be the Bella Aurora, sailing from Genoa to Barcelona with a cargo of cotton, silk and rice, and armed with 10 guns, all 9- or 6-pounders. In his report Peard pointed out that the attack had been carried out in broad daylight by only 43 men against a vessel crewed by 113, protected by boarding netting, and supported from the shore by a small gun battery and a large number of men with muskets. Subsequently, in 1847, a clasp to the Naval General Service Medal marked "9 June 1799" awarded to any surviving members of the action who applied for it. Shortly after, Success was one of the fleet, part of which fought the action of 18 June 1799, in which three French frigates and two brigs were captured.
HMS Success was a 32-gun Amazon-class fifth-rate frigate of the British Royal Navy launched in 1781, which served during the American Revolutionary, French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. The French captured her in the Mediterranean on 13 February 1801, but she was recaptured by the British on 2 September. She continued to serve in the Mediterranean until 1811, and in North America until hulked in 1814, then serving as a prison ship and powder hulk, before being broken up in 1820.
HMS_Success_vs_Santa_Catalina.jpg

Success destroys the Santa Catalina, 16 March 1782


1800 - Action of 1800/06/09, 9th June 1800
On June 9th 1800, the HMS Kangaroo, 18, Commander George Christopher Pulling, and HMS Speedy, 14, Commander Lord Cochrane, attacked a Spanish convoy off Oropeso, under the shelter of a Spanish battery, sank a 20-gun xebec and three gunboats, and captured three merchant brigs.


1801 - HMS Meleager (32), Cptn. Thomas Bladen Capel, wrecked on the Triangles, Gulf of Mexico.
HMS Meleager
was a 32-gun frigate that Greaves and Nickolson built in 1785 at the Quarry House yard in Frindsbury, Kent, England. She served during the French Revolutionary Wars until 1801, when she was wrecked in the Gulf of Mexico.
j5706.jpg


j5766.jpg



1808 - Action off Saltholm, 9th June 1808
21 Danish gunboats and 12 mortar shallops, under Cmdr Johan C. Krieger, engages a British escorted convoy in the southern part of the Sound. HMS Turbulent (12) and 11 merchant ships are captured.

The Battle of Saltholm was fought on 9 June 1808 during the Gunboat War. Danish and Norwegian ships attacked a British convoy off the island of Saltholm in Øresund Strait near Copenhagen.
Kanonbåde_1808.jpg

HMS Turbulent captured by a Danish gunboat during the Gunboat War on 9 June 1808


1811 – Launch of French Mont Saint-Bernard was an 82-gun Téméraire-class ship of the line of the French Navy.
Mont Saint-Bernard was an 82-gun Téméraire-class ship of the line of the French Navy.
On 20 April 1814, after the abdication of Napoleon at the end of the War of the Sixth Coalition, she was handed over to the Austrians, who burnt her.
1280px-Mont_Saint_Bernard_img_3102.jpg

Ship of the line Mont Saint Bernard fitted with Ship Camels, external ballast to sail over shallow waters


1930 – Launch of Black Douglas (later teQuest, Aquarius, Aquarius W; now El Boughaz I), a three-masted staysail auxiliary schooner built for Robert C. Roebling (great-grandson of John A. Roebling and grand-nephew of Washington Roebling) at the Bath Iron Works of Bath, Maine.
Designed by renowned New York City naval architects H.J. Gielow & Co., she is one of the largest steel-hulled schooners ever built.

The Black Douglas (later teQuest, Aquarius, Aquarius W; now El Boughaz I) is a three-masted staysail auxiliary schooner built for Robert C. Roebling (great-grandson of John A. Roebling and grand-nephew of Washington Roebling) at the Bath Iron Works of Bath, Maine, and launched on 9 June 1930. Designed by renowned New York City naval architects H.J. Gielow & Co., she is one of the largest steel-hulled schooners ever built.
12144507.jpg


14058796147_1312ff1d14_b.jpg



1940 – Launch of Roma, named after two previous ships and the city of Rome, was the third Vittorio Veneto-class battleship of Italy's Regia Marina (Royal Navy).
Roma, named after two previous ships and the city of Rome, was the third Vittorio Veneto-class battleship of Italy's Regia Marina (Royal Navy). The construction of both Roma and her sister ship Impero was due to rising tensions around the world and the navy's fear that only two Vittorio Venetos, even in company with older pre-First World War battleships, would not be enough to counter the British and French Mediterranean Fleets. As Roma was laid down almost four years after the first two ships of the class, some small improvements were made to the design, including additional freeboard added to the bow.
1920px-Battleship_Roma.jpg



1944 - Battle of Ushant - Allied 10th destroyer flotilla (UK/Canadian/Polish ships) engage and defeat remnants of the German 8th destroyer flotilla off Brittany
The Battle of Ushant, also known as the Battle of Brittany, occurred on the early morning of 9 June 1944 and was an engagement between German and Allied destroyer flotillas off the coast of Brittany. The action came shortly after the initial Allied landings in Normandy. After a confused engagement during the night the Allies sank one of the German destroyers and forced another ashore, where she was wrecked.
HMS_Tartar_ensign.jpg



1959 – The USS George Washington is launched. It is the first nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine.
USS George Washington (SSBN-598)
was the United States's first operational ballistic missile submarine. It was the lead ship of her class of nuclear ballistic missile submarines, was the third United States Navy ship of the name, in honor of George Washington (1732–1799), first President of the United States, and the first of that name to be purpose-built as a warship.
USS_George_Washington_(SSBN_589).jpg



2017 – Launch of Symphony of the Seas is an Oasis-class cruise ship owned and operated by Royal Caribbean International.[8] As of 2019 it is the largest passenger ship in the world by gross tonnage, at 228,021 GT, surpassing her sister Harmony of the Seas
1920px-SymphonyOfTheSeas_(cropped)_02.jpg
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

10th of June

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1647 - Battle of Puerto de Cavite - Spanish defeat Dutch attack near Manila
Twelve Dutch ships besieged Puerto de Cavite, the home of the Manila galleons
The Spaniards and Filipinos defended the port with artillery fire and sank the Dutch flagship. Subsequently the Dutch left with the Spaniards and Filipinos still maintaining control over the port.


1666 – Launch of HMS Loyal London, an 80-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Deptford Dockyard

Loyal London was an 80-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 10 June 1666 at Deptford Dockyard with a burthen of 1,236 tons. She was established with 80 guns comprising 22 cannon-of-seven, 4 demi-cannon, 26 culverins and 28 demi-culverins; in July 1666 this was raised to 92 guns, comprising 7 cannon-of-seven, 19 demi-cannon, 28 culverins, 26 12-pounders and 12 demi-culverins.
The_Building_of_the_Loyal_London,_by_Frank_Henry_Mason.jpg

The building of the Loyal London, by Frank Henry Mason

pz7302.jpg

A portrait of the English 96-gun, first-rate ship ‘London’, which was built in 1670 and rebuilt in 1706


1673 – Birth of Rene Duguay-Trouin in St. Malo, France.
French privateer and naval officer, he captured 300 merchantmen and 20 warships during his career
René Trouin, Sieur du Gué
, usually called René Duguay-Trouin, (10 June 1673 in Saint Malo – 1736) was a famous Breton corsair of Saint-Malo. He had a brilliant privateering and naval career and eventually became "Lieutenant-General of the Naval Armies of the King" (i.e. Vice admiral) (French:Lieutenant-Général des armées navales du roi), and a Commander in the Order of Saint-Louis. Ten ships of the French Navy were named in his honour.
800px-René_Duguay-Trouin_statue_in_Saint_Malo.jpg René_Duguay-Trouin.jpg
Statue in St Malo


1703 – Launch of HMS Nottingham, a 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Deptford Dockyard
HMS Nottingham
was a 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Deptford Dockyard and launched on 10 June 1703. She was the first ship to bear the name.
Samuel_Scott_-_Action_Between_Nottingham_And_Mars_1746.jpg

Samuel Scott's Action between HMS Nottingham and the Mars. Mars was returning to France after the failed Duc d'Anville Expedition, 11 October 1746


1723 - The Capture of the schooner Fancy was a famous British victory over two pirate ships under Captain Edward Low.
The Capture of the schooner Fancy was a famous British victory over two pirate ships under Captain Edward Low. When off Delaware Bay Low attacked a Royal Navy man-of-war which he mistook for a whaler. The resulting combat lasted several hours and ended with the capture of one pirate vessel.[1] In fact, the captured vessel was not the one named Fancy - factually, the combat should have been called "Capture of the sloop Ranger."
The_Cruelties_practised_by_Captain_Low.jpg

Artist's depiction of life aboard the schooner Fancy


1744 – Launch of French Emeraude at Le Havre – captured by British Navy 21 September 1757, becoming HMS Emerald.


1770 - Capture of Port Egmont

In June 1770, the Spanish governor of Buenos Aires, Francisco de Paula Bucareli y Ursua, sent five frigates under General Juan Ignacio de Madariaga to Port Egmont. On 4 June, a Spanish frigate anchored in the harbour; she was presently followed by four others, containing some 1400 marines. The small British force was under the command of Commander George Farmer. Madariaga wrote to Farmer on 10 June that having with him fourteen hundred troops and a train of artillery, he was in a position to compel the English to quit, if they hesitated any longer. Farmer replied that he should defend himself to the best of his power; but when the Spaniards landed, after firing his guns, Farmer capitulated on terms, an inventory of the stores being taken, and the British were permitted to return to their country in the HMS Favourite.


1796 - HMS Arab was the French 20-gun corvette Jean Bart, launched in 1793.
The British captured her in 1795 and the Royal Navy took her into service. She was wrecked in 10 June 1796.
HMS Arab
was the French 20-gun corvette Jean Bart, a Révolutionnaire-class corvette launched in 1793. The British captured her in 1795 and the Royal Navy took her into service. She was wrecked in 1796.
j4172.jpg

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan with port side stern board outline, sheer lines with inboard detail, and longitudinal half-breadth for Arab (captured 1795)


1805 - Action of 1805/06/10, 10th June 1805
HMS Chiffonne (36), HMS Falcon (14), HMS Clinker (14), and the Frances hired armed cutter, engaged French gunboats Foudre (10), Audacieuse (10), and 7 others protecting a convoy off the coast of France.

A French division, consisting of the sloops Foudre, 10, and Audacieuse, 10, fifteen gun-vessels [Four of three long 24-prs. and one 8-in. howitzer; three of one 24-pr. and one field gun; and eight of two 4- or 6-prs], and fourteen transports, under Captain J. F. E. Hamelin, sailed from Le Havre for Fecamp. They were chased by the Chiffonne, 36, Captain Charles Adam, Falcon, 14, Commander George Sanders, Clinker, gun-brig, Lieutenant Nisbet Glen, and Frances, hired armed cutter, and brought to action; but, when the French vessels gradually edged in under the protection of the shore batteries, the British began to get the worst of the firing, though some of the hostile craft were by that time aground. The enemy ultimately got under the forts of Fecamp. In this skirmish the Chiffonne had two killed and three wounded; the Falcon four wounded, and the Clinker one killed and one wounded.
Chiffonne was a 38-gun Heureuse-class frigate of the French Navy. She was built at Nantes and launched in 1799. The British Royal Navy captured her in 1801. In 1809 she participated in a campaign against pirates in the Persian Gulf. She was sold for breaking up in 1814.
Sybille_vs_Chiffone-cropped.jpg

HMS Sybille capturing Chiffonne


1808 – Launch of HMS Crocus, the nameship of the Crocus-class brig-sloops of the Royal Navy.
HMS Crocus
was the nameship of the Crocus-class brig-sloops of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1808 and had an almost completely uneventful career until she was sold in 1815. she then became a merchantman trading with the West Indies and the Mediterranean. She was last listed in 1823.
j4766.jpg



1809 - HMS Amelia (38), Cptn. Frederick Paul rby, and HMS Statira captured French national vessels Mouche (16), Rejouie (8) and a schooner together with 2 luggers Legere and Notre Dame at Santander.
Action at Santander (1809-10)

On 15 May 1809 Lord Gambier ordered Captain Irby to investigate the situation at St. Ander where an attack was about to be made by Spanish patriots on the French troops in the town. Statira joined him on 8 June but strong winds and current prevented them getting there before 10 June. As they approached they could see firing on shore and several vessels trying to escape from the harbour. The two British ships captured three French vessels: the corvette Mouche, of sixteen brass 8-pounders and 180 men; the brig Réjouie with eight 8-pounders; and a schooner, Mouche No.7, with one 4-pounder gun. They also took two luggers: Légère, which was unseaworthy so her cargo was put on board Réjouie; and Notre Dame, a Spanish vessel the French had seized. The aide-de-camp to General Ballestero reported that the town was in possession of the Spanish and that the French troops had all surrendered. Because of the large number of prisoners, Captain Irby sent Statira into the harbour with the prizes while Amelia remained off the coast in hopes of being able to render more assistance to the Spaniards. The corvette Mouche, which the sloop Goldfinch and the hired armed lugger Black Joke had recently engaged, had been a threat to British trade for some time. Lloyd's List reported that on 20 June the Mouche, French corvette, of 18 guns and 180 men, with "Soldier's Cloathing, and Specie", the "French brig Resource laden with masts", and a "French schooner in Ballast" had arrived at Plymouth. They had arrived from St Ander and were prizes to Statira and Amelia>
John_Christian_Schetky,_HMS_Amelia_Chasing_the_French_Frigate_Aréthuse_1813_(1852).jpg

HMS "Amelia" Chasing the French Frigate "Aréthuse" 1813. Painted in 1852 by John Christian Schetky


1833 - Launch of HMS Waterloo, a 120-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Chatham
View_of_Greenwich_in_1877_Showing_the_Training_Ship_HMS_Warspite.jpg

View of Greenwich in 1877 Showing the Training Ship Warspite

d4069_6.jpg


d4069_7.jpg

Scale: 1:48. A contemporary sectional model of the 'Caledonia' (1808), a 120-gun three-decker ship of the line, built plank on frame in the Georgian style.


1871 – Sinmiyangyo: Captain McLane Tilton leads 109 US Marines in a naval attack on Han River forts on Kanghwa Island, Korea.
The Battle of Ganghwa was fought during the conflict between Joseon and the United States in 1871. In May, an expedition of five Asiatic Squadron warships set sail from Japan to Korea in order to establish trade relations, ensure the safety of shipwrecked sailors, and to find out what happened to the crew of the SS General Sherman. When American forces arrived in Korea, the originally peaceful mission turned into a battle when guns from a Korean fort suddenly opened fire on the Americans. The battle to capture Ganghwa Island's forts was the largest engagement of the conflict.


1893 – Launch of USS Massachusetts (BB-2), a Indiana-class battleship and the second United States Navy ship comparable to foreign battleships of its time
USS Massachusetts (BB-2)
is a Indiana-class battleship and the second United States Navy ship comparable to foreign battleships of its time. Today she is a diving site off Pensacola, Florida.
Authorized in 1890 and commissioned six years later, she was a small battleship, though with heavy armor and ordnance. The ship class also pioneered the use of an intermediate battery. She was designed for coastal defense and as a result, her decks were not safe from high waves on the open ocean.
Massachusetts_(BB2)._Starboard_bow_at_wharf,_06-1901_-_NARA_-_535432.tif.jpg



1896 – Launch of Belem, a french three-masted barque
She made her maiden voyage as a cargo ship in 1896, transporting sugar from the West Indies, cocoa, and coffee from Brazil and French Guiana to Nantes, France.
French_tallship_Belem.png

Line art of Belem



1918 – The Austro-Hungarian battleship SMS Szent István sinks off the Croatian coast after being torpedoed by an Italian MAS motorboat; the event is recorded by camera from a nearby vessel.
SMS Szent István
(His Majesty's Ship Saint Stephen) was the last of four Tegetthoff-class dreadnought battleships built for the Austro-Hungarian Navy. Szent István was named for the 11th-century saint Stephen I, the first King of Hungary. Szent István was the only ship of her class to be built within the Hungarian part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, a concession made to the Hungarian government in return for its support for the 1910 and 1911 naval budgets which funded the Tegetthoff class. She was built at the Ganz-Danubius shipyard in Fiume, where she was laid down in January 1912. Launched two years later in 1914, construction on Szent István was delayed due to the smaller shipyards in Fiume, and further delayed by the outbreak of World War I in July 1914. She was finally commissioned into the Austro-Hungarian Navy in December 1915.
Szent_Istvan.jpg


 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

11th of June

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events




1794 – Launch of HMS Seahorse, a 38-gun Artois-class fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy.
lossy-page1-1280px-HMS_Seahorse_capturing_the_Badiri-i-Zaffer,_6_July_1808_RMG_BHC0586.tiff.jpg

HMS Seahorse capturing the Badiri-i-Zaffer, 6 July 1808

j7957.jpg

Plan showing the body plan, stern board outline, sheer lines, and longitudinal half-breadth for Seahorse (1794).

j7955.jpg

Plan showing a longitudinal half-breadth of the upper deck for Seahorse (1794).

There is a beautiful great kit in scale 1:64 of an Artois-class frigate available..... The HMS Diana manufactured by Jotika / Caldercraft
Diana_01_07_lrg.jpg Diana_02_01_lrg.jpg DIANA_lrg.jpg


1794 - HMS Ranger was the 14-gun revenue cutter Rose, launched in 1776, that the Royal Navy purchased in 1787, and that the French captured on 11 June 1794.
The British recaptured her (twice) in 1797 and renamed her HMS Venturer (or Venturier).

j0564.jpg

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan, sheer lines with some inboard detail, and longitudinal half-breadth for the Royal Ranger (no date), a Cutter. Not in Progress Book or Dimensions Book under Cutters


1798 - Maltese ship San Giovanni, captured on the stocks in 1798 by the French and launched and commissioned as Athénien.
HMS
Athenienne was a 64-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She was the former Maltese ship San Giovanni, which the French captured on the stocks in 1798 and launched and commissioned as Athénien. The Royal Navy captured her at or prior to the surrender of Valletta, on 4 September 1800, and took her into service as HMS Athenienne. She was wrecked near Sicily, with great loss of life, in 1806.
1280px-3rd_rate_ship_of_the_line_MMM_n01.jpg

A model of an 18th century third-rate of the Order of Saint John, similar to the San Giovanni


1865 - The Naval Battle of the Riachuelo
is fought on the rivulet Riachuelo (Argentina), between the Paraguayan Navy on one side and the Brazilian Navy on the other. The Brazilian victory was crucial for the later success of the Triple Alliance (Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina) in the Paraguayan War.

Palácio_Pedro_Ernesto_-_Batalha_do_Riachuelo_-_cópia.jpg

The Battle of Riachuelo by Victor Meirelles


1913 - General Concha, a General Concha-class Cañonero (gunboat), wrecked
General Concha was a General Concha-class Cañonero (gunboat) or more technically "Third Class non-armored Cruiser" of the Spanish Navy which fought at San Juan, Puerto Rico, during the Spanish–American War.
Generalconcha.jpg



1926 – Launch of Padua, nowadays known as Kruzenshtern or Krusenstern, the last active of the Flying P-Liners
Kruzenshtern or Krusenstern (Russian: Крузенштерн) is a four-masted barque (Russian: барк) that was built in 1926 at Geestemünde in Bremerhaven, Germany as Padua (named after the Italian city). She was surrendered to the USSR in 1946 as war reparation and renamed after the early 19th century Baltic German explorer in Russian service, Adam Johann Krusenstern (1770–1846). She is now a Russian sail training ship.
1280px-Крузенштерн_Radich.jpg


 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
The circle of a year is now the Third time complete, so we have to start once more
- in the meantime we have more than 5.000 posts in this thread and more than 2 million views!!!!

-> So it now the 4th year already with

Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

12th of June


please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events




1775 - The Battle of Machias (June 11–12, 1775) was the first naval engagement of the American Revolutionary War, also known as the Battle of the Margaretta, fought around the port of Machias, Maine.
Following the outbreak of the war, British authorities enlisted Loyalist merchant Ichabod Jones to supply the troops who were under the Siege of Boston. Two of his merchant ships arrived in Machias on June 2, 1775, accompanied by a British armed sloop called the HM Margaretta (sometimes also spelled Margueritta or Marguerite) that was commanded by Midshipman James Moore. The townspeople of Machias disapproved of Jones' intentions and arrested him. They also tried to arrest Moore, but he escaped through the harbor. The townspeople seized one of Jones' ships, armed it alongside a second local ship, and sailed out to meet Moore. After a short confrontation, Moore was fatally wounded, and his vessel and crew were captured.
The people of Machias captured additional British ships, and fought off a large force that tried to take control of the town in the Battle of Machias in 1777. Privateers and others operating out of Machias continued to harass the Royal Navy throughout the war.

Margaretta.jpg



1653First Anglo-Dutch War: The Battle of the Gabbard begins and lasts until June 13.

1942 - USS Swordfish (SS 193) sinks Japanese freighter Burma Maru northwest of Pulo Wai in the Gulf of Siam.

1943 - TBF aircraft from Composite Squadron Nine (VC 9) based on board USS Bogue (ACV 9) sink German submarine (U 118) west by north of the Canary Islands.

1957 - More than 100 ships from 17 nations take part in the International Naval Review at Hampton Roads, Va. in honor of the 350th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, Va.

1970 - After an earthquake in Peru, USS Guam (LPH 9) begins 11 days of relief flights to transport medical teams and supplies, as well as rescue victims.

1993 - USS Cape St. George (CG 71) is commissioned at its homeport of Norfolk Naval Base. The Ticonderoga-class Aegis guided-missile cruiser is the first named for the Battle of Cape St. George when a destroyer squadron led by Capt. Arleigh Burke faced off against a five-ship Japanese destroyer force on Nov. 25, 1943 near New Ireland. DESRON 23 sank three destroyers and damaged a fourth during that World War II battle.
 
Last edited:

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

13th of June


please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1801 - HMS Dreadnought was a Royal Navy 98-gun second rate of the Neptune-class.
This ship of the line was launched at Portsmouth at midday on Saturday, 13 June 1801, after she had spent 13 years on the stocks. She was the first man-of-war launched since the Act of Union 1800 created the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and at her head displayed a lion couchant on a scroll bearing the Royal arms as emblazoned on the Standard.
The launch was a spectacle; it was reported that at least 10,000 people witnessed Commissioner Sir Charles Saxton break a bottle of wine over her stem, and that after the launch Sir Charles gave a most sumptuous cold collation to the nobility and officers of distinction.
After the launch, Dreadnought was brought into dock for coppering, and a great number of people went on board to view her. The following day, due to the exertions of Mr Peake, the builder, and the artificers of the dockyard, she was completely coppered in six hours and on Monday morning she went out of dock for rigging and fitting.
large (2).jpg



1881 - The sinking of the USS Jeannette - ex. HMS Pandora
The bark-rigged wooden steamship USS Jeannette was a naval exploration vessel which, under the command of George W. De Long, undertook an ill-fated 1879–1881 voyage to the Arctic. After being trapped in the ice and drifting for almost two years, the ship and its crew of 33 were released from the ice, then trapped again, crushed and sunk some 300 nautical miles (560 km; 350 mi) north of the Siberian coast. The entire crew survived the sinking, but 11 died while sailing towards land in a small cutter. The other 22 reached Siberia, but 9 of them, including De Long, subsequently perished in the wastes of the Lena Delta.
USS_Jeannette;h52199.jpg



1973 - Collision incident between russian submarine K-56 (Project 675 (also known by the NATO reporting name of Echo II class) nuclear submarine) and the research ship Academician Berg, traveling at 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph). The ship struck K-56 on the starboard side, tearing a four-meter hole through the hull into the first and second compartments. A civilian expert from Leningrad, 16 officers, five warrant officers, and five sailors were killed.
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

14th of June


please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events




1667 ending of The Raid on the Medway (9-14 June 1667), during the Second Anglo-Dutch War in June 1667, was a successful attack conducted by the Dutch navy on English battleships at a time when most were virtually unmanned and unarmed, laid up in the fleet anchorages off Chatham Dockyard and Gillingham in the county of Kent. At the time, the fortress of Upnor Castle and a barrier chain called the "Gillingham Line" were supposed to protect the English ships.

1673 2.nd battle of Schooneveld
The Battles of Schooneveld were two naval battles of the Franco-Dutch War, fought off the coast of the Netherlands on 7 June and 14 June 1673 (New Style; 28 May and 4 June in the Julian calendar then in use in England) between an allied Anglo-French fleet commanded by Prince Rupert of the Rhine on his flagship the Royal Charles, and the fleet of the United Provinces, commanded by Michiel de Ruyter. The Dutch victories in the two battles, and at the Battle of Texel that followed in August, saved their country from an Anglo-French invasion.
Van_de_Velde,_Battle_of_Schooneveld.jpg
The first battle of Schooneveld, 7 June 1673 by Willem van de Velde, the elder, painted c.1684.

1777 - The Continental Congress adopts the design of present U.S. flag of 13 stripes and 13 stars.
On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution which stated: “Resolved, That the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation.”
The US-Flag Day is now observed on June 14 of each year. A false tradition holds that the new flag was first hoisted in June of 1777 by the Continental Army at the Middlebrook encampment.
380px-US_flag_13_stars_–_Betsy_Ross_svg.png

RossBetsy.jpg
The origin of the stars and stripes design is uncertain. A popular story credits Betsy Ross for sewing the first flag from a pencil sketch by George Washington who personally commissioned her for the job. However, no evidence for this theory exists beyond Ross’ descendants’ much later recollections of what she told her family. Another woman, Rebecca Young, has also been credited as having made the first flag by later generations of her family. Rebecca Young’s daughter was Mary Pickersgill, who made the Star Spangled Banner Flag.

1777 - John Paul Jones takes command of the Continental Navy sloop USS Ranger
The ship

The first USS Ranger was a sloop-of-war in the Continental Navy in active service in 1777–1780; she received the second salute to an American fighting vessel by a foreign power (the first salute was received by the USS Andrew Doria when on 16 November 1776 she arrived at St. Eustatius and the Dutch island returned her 11-gun salute). She was captured in 1780, and brought into the Royal Navy as HMS Halifax. She was decommissioned in 1781.
ranger.jpg

1789 – Mutiny on the Bounty: HMS Bounty mutiny survivors including Captain William Bligh and 18 others reach Timor after a nearly 7,400 km (4,600 mi) journey in an open boat
Mutiny_HMS_Bounty.jpg

1847 - Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry conducts the second expedition against Tabasco, Mexico, also known as the Battle of Villahermosa.
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

15th of June

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1775 - Abraham Whipple takes command of Rhode Island's coastal defense ship Katy and captures at the same day a tender of HMS Rose. In December, Katy is taken into the Continental service and renamed USS Providence.
Continental_Sloop_Providence_(1775-1779).jpg
USS Providence - ex-Katy

BTW: The replica of the HMS Rose was used for the film Master and Commander and named for this time HMS Surprise
3fkyhnulcm4z.jpg


1904 - SS General Slocum disaster - more than 1.000 people - most of them german settlers - killed
On June 15, 1904, General Slocum caught fire and sank in the East River of New York City. At the time of the accident, she was on a chartered run carrying members of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church (German Americans from Little Germany, Manhattan) to a church picnic. An estimated 1,021 of the 1,342 people on board died. The General Slocum disaster was the New York area's worst disaster in terms of loss of life until the September 11, 2001 attacks. It is the worst maritime disaster in the city's history, and the second worst maritime disaster on United States waterways.

PS_General_Slocum.jpg
The PS General Slocum was a sidewheel passenger steamboat built in Brooklyn, New York, in 1891. During her service history, she was involved in a number of mishaps, including multiple groundings and collisions.


1944 - Following intensive naval gunfire and carrier-based aircraft bombing, Task Force 52 lands the Marines on Saipan, which is the first relatively large and heavily defended land mass in the Central Pacific to be assaulted by US amphibious forces.
The Battle of Saipan was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on the island of Saipan in the Mariana Islands from 15 June to 9 July 1944. The Allied invasion fleet embarking the expeditionary forces left Pearl Harbor on 5 June 1944, the day before Operation Overlord in Europe was launched. The U.S. 2nd Marine Division, 4th Marine Division, and the Army's 27th Infantry Division, commanded by Lieutenant General Holland Smith, defeated the 43rd Infantry Division of the Imperial Japanese Army, commanded by Lieutenant General Yoshitsugu Saito.
1280px-LVTs_move_toward_Saipan,_past_bombarding_cruisers,_on_15_June_1944_(80-G-231838).jpg
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
17,179
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

16th of June

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



Action of 16 May 1797 was a naval battle that took place near Tripoli in Ottoman Tripolitania (present-day Libya). The Danish squadron was victorious over a Tripolitan squadron that outnumbered them in terms of the number of vessels. The result was a peace treaty between the Bey of Tripoli and Denmark.

After the newly appointed Bey of Tripoli, Sidi Yussuf, demanded an increased tribute (essentially a bribe to stop Tripolitans preying on Danish merchant ships), and captured two Danish vessels, whose crews he sold into slavery, Denmark sent Captain Lorenz Fisker in the 40-gun frigate Thetis to Tripoli. He had two missions: first, to escort the annual "gift ship" to Algiers, and second, to arrange for the freeing of the two Danish vessels and their crews. He arrived at Tripoli on 30 August 1796, but failed to free the captured sailors, or even to agree a ransom price.

HDMS_Najaden_(1796).jpg
Najaden at Tripoli in 1797, Royal Danish Naval Museum

The Action
The Danes therefore decided to make a second attempt. They sent Captain Steen Andersen Bille in the frigate Najaden 40, under Captain John Hoppe, to Malta, where she arrived on 2 May 1797. There the Danes met up with the brig Sarpen 18, under Captain Charles Christian De Holck. They also hired a xebec of six guns, and put in a Danish crew under Lieutenant Hans Munck (or Munk), of Sarpen. This squadron then sailed from Malta for Tripoli. On 12 May, off the coast of Lampedusa, they met with Fisker and Thetis. Fisker transferred command of Danish forces in the Mediterranean to Bille and sailed for home. Bille's small squadron sailed past the forts guarding Tripoli on 15 May 1797. Among the guns firing on the Danish vessels from the forts were four Danish cannons that the Libyan envoy Abderahman al Bidiri had obtained from the King of Denmark in 1772.


HMS Culloden (1783) was a 74-gun Ganges-class third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 16 June 1783 at Rotherhithe. She took part in some of the most famous battles of the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars before she was broken up in 1813.

Culloden_Man_of_War.jpg Ganges(1782)_Culloden_(1783).jpg
 
Top