Naval/Maritime History 17th of April - Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

19th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1694 - HMS Sussex (80), Ad. Sir Francis Wheler, and HMS Cambridge (70) Capt. John WARD, lost in a hurricane off Gibraltar - in total 13 ships were lost with 1,200 casualties in total
HMS Sussex
was an 80-gun third-rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy, lost in a severe storm on 19 February 1694 off Gibraltar. On board were possibly 10 tons of gold coins. This could now be worth more than $500 million, including the bullion and antiquity values, making it one of the most valuable wrecks ever.
HMS_Sussex_(80)_model_starboard_broadside.jpg

Model of HMS Sussex, starboard

A wonderful model of the Sussex in scale 1:60 was built by our member @ramonolivenza I was able to see in reality during my visit in Rochefort last year:
IMG_07931.JPG



1741 – Launch of HMS Drake, an 8-gun snow-rigged sloop of the Royal Navy,
HMS Drake
was an 8-gun snow-rigged sloop of the Royal Navy, launched in 1741 as the first of three Drake class sloops constructed for convoy duty during the Anglo-Spanish War of Jenkins' Ear from 1739 to 1742. After limited service off the Channel Islands, she was sailed to Gibraltar where she was wrecked in 1742 while under the temporary command of her first lieutenant.
large.jpg



1758 - HMS Invincible (74) lost on the Owers.
The Invincible was originally a 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy launched in October 1744. Captured on 14 October 1747, she was taken into Royal Navy service as the third rate HMS Invincible.
large (6).jpg



1760 - Launch of HMS Bellona, a 74-gun Bellona-class third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Bellona
was a 74-gun Bellona-class third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. Designed by Sir Thomas Slade, she was a prototype for the iconic 74-gun ships of the latter part of the 18th century. "The design of the Bellona class was never repeated precisely, but Slade experimented slightly with the lines, and the Arrogant, Ramillies, Egmont, and Elizabeth classes were almost identical in size, layout, and structure, and had only slight variations in the shape of the underwater hull. The Culloden class ship of the line was also similar, but slightly larger. Thus over forty ships were near-sisters of the Bellona." Bellona was built at Chatham, starting on 10 May 1758, launched on 19 February 1760, and commissioned three days later. She was the second ship of the Royal Navy to bear the name, and saw service in the Seven Years' War, American Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic Wars.
large (8).jpg



1794 - British squadron under Commodore Robert Linzee captured Minerve.
Minerve was a 40-gun frigate of the French Navy, lead ship of her class. She operated in the Mediterranean during the French Revolutionary Wars. Her crew scuttled her at Saint-Florent to avoid capture when the British invaded Corsica in 1794, but the British managed to raise her and recommissioned her in the Royal Navy as the 38-gun fifth rate HMS St Fiorenzo (also San Fiorenzo).
HMS_St_Fiorenzo_and_Piemontaise.jpg



1801 - Action of 19 February 1801
HMS Phoebe (36), Cptn. Robert Barlow took French frigate Africaine (44), Cptn. Majendie, off Ceuta in Morocco.

The Action of 19 February 1801 was a minor naval battle fought off Ceuta in Spanish North Africa in February 1801 between frigates of the French and Royal Navies during the French Revolutionary Wars. The engagement formed part of a series of actions fought to prevent the French from resupplying their garrison in Egypt, which had been trapped there without significant reinforcement since the defeat of the French Mediterranean Fleet at the Battle of the Nile two and a half years earlier. The leader of the Egyptian expedition, General Napoleon Bonaparte, had returned to France in 1799 and promised aid to the troops left behind, prompting several expeditions to the region carrying reinforcements.
The frigate Africaine had been sent from Rochefort early in 1801 with more than 400 soldiers for the Egyptian garrison, and by February had reached the Mediterranean Sea, Commodore Saulnier seeking to pass along the North African coast to avoid patrolling Royal Navy warships. On the afternoon of 19 February however the overladen French warship was discovered by the British HMS Phoebe and rapidly chased down and brought to action. In an engagement lasting two hours, the French ship was reduced to a wallowing wreck as broadsides from Phoebe tore through the hull, rigging and the soldiers packed on the decks: by the time Africaine surrendered, 200 men were dead and another 143 wounded. The captured ship was brought into the base at Port Mahon in Menorca and subsequently served in the Royal Navy.
large (14).jpg



1804 - Gun-brig HMS Cerbere, Lt. Joseph Patey, wrecked on rocks near Berry Head, Torbey
HMS Cerbere
was the French naval brig Cerbère, ex-Chalier, which the British captured in 1800. She was wrecked in 1804.
large (17).jpg



1829 – Launch of HMS Eurotas, a Seringapatam-class frigate
The Seringapatam-class frigates, were a class of British Royal Navy 46-gun sailing frigates. The first vessel of the class was HMS Seringapatam. Seringapatam's design was based on the French frigate Président, which the British had captured in 1806. Seringapatam was originally ordered as a 38-gun frigate, but the re-classification of British warships which took effect in February 1817 raised this rating to 46-gun.
large (25).jpg


large (23).jpg



1860 - transatlantic steamship of the Canadian Allan Line SS Hungarian was wrecked at Cape Sable Island, off Nova Scotia, with the loss of all aboard.
SS Hungarian
was a transatlantic steamship of the Canadian Allan Line that was launched in 1858, completed in 1859 and sank in 1860.
William Denny and Brothers of Dumbarton, Scotland launched her on September 25, 1858. She was powered by a 400 nhp direct-acting steam engine that drove a single screw. She was completed in 1859. Hungarian's maiden voyage began on May 18, 1859 when she left Liverpool for Quebec. She was wrecked in 1860 at Cape Sable Island, off Nova Scotia, with the loss of all aboard.


Hungarian-1858.svg.png

Vectorized picture of steamer Hungarian


1901 – Launch of HMS Russell, a Duncan-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy
HMS Russell
was a Duncan-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy commissioned in 1903. Built to counter a group of fast Russian battleships, Russell and her sister ships were capable of steaming at 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph), making them the fastest battleships in the world. The Duncan-class battleships were armed with a main battery of four 12-inch (305 mm) guns and they were broadly similar to the London-class battleships, though of a slightly reduced displacement and thinner armour layout. As such, they reflected a development of the lighter second-class ships of the Canopus-class battleship. Russell was built between her keel laying in March 1899 and her completion in February 1903.
HMS_Russell_LOC_LC-DIG-ggbain-21816.jpg



1915 – World War I: The first naval attack on the Dardanelles begins when a strong Anglo-French task force bombards Ottoman artillery along the coast of Gallipoli.
The Naval Operations in the Dardanelles Campaign (17 February 1915 – 9 January 1916) took place against the Ottoman Empire during the First World War. Ships of the Royal Navy, French Marine nationale, Imperial Russian Navy (Российский императорский флот) and the Royal Australian Navy, attempted to force the defences of the Dardanelles Straits. The straits are a narrow waterway connecting the Mediterranean Sea with the Black Sea, via the Aegean, Sea of Marmara and the Bosphorus. The Dardanelles Campaign began as a naval operation but the success of the Ottoman defence led to the Gallipoli Campaign, an attempt to occupy the Gallipoli peninsula with land forces supported by the navies, to open the sea route to Constantinople. The Allies also tried to pass submarines through the Dardanelles to attack Ottoman shipping in the Sea of Marmara.
HMS_Canopus_bombarding_Turkish_forts_March_1915.jpg



1929 - TSS Kanowna, an Australian steamer built during 1902, ran aground and sank
TSS Kanowna
, was an Australian steamer built during 1902. The 6,993-ton, 126-metre (413 ft)[citation needed] long Kanowna was constructed by William Denny and Brothers of Dumbarton, Scotland, and had a twin screw design
Kanowna_I.JPG



1942 - The Japanese attack Darwin, Australia in the largest attack by a foreign power on that country.
USS Peary (DD 226), as well as an Army transport and freighter sink in the raid, as well as a number of Australian and British vessels.

The Bombing of Darwin, also known as the Battle of Darwin, on 19 February 1942 was the largest single attack ever mounted by a foreign power on Australia. On that day, 242 Japanese aircraft, in two separate raids, attacked the town, ships in Darwin's harbour and the town's two airfields in an attempt to prevent the Allies from using them as bases to contest the invasion of Timor and Java during World War II.
Darwin was lightly defended relative to the size of the attack, and the Japanese inflicted heavy losses upon Allied forces at little cost to themselves. The urban areas of Darwin also suffered some damage from the raids and there were a number of civilian casualties. More than half of Darwin's civilian population left the area permanently, before or immediately after the attack.
The two Japanese air raids were the first, and largest, of more than 100 air raids against Australia during 1942–43.
Darwin_42.jpg



1942 – French Surcouf, the largest French cruiser submarine, disappeared
Surcouf was the largest French cruiser submarine. She served in both the French Navy and the Free French Naval Forces during the Second World War. She was lost during the night of 18/19 February 1942 in the Caribbean Sea, possibly after colliding with an American freighter. Surcouf was named after the French privateer Robert Surcouf. She was the largest submarine built until surpassed by the first Japanese I-400-class submarine in 1943.
Surcouf_FRA.jpg


DiCUJNm.jpg
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

20th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1685 – René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle establishes Fort St. Louis at Matagorda Bay thus forming the basis for France's claim to Texas.
The French colonization of Texas began with the establishment of a fort in present-day southeastern Texas. It was established in 1685 near Arenosa Creek and Matagorda Bay by explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle. He intended to found the colony at the mouth of the Mississippi River, but inaccurate maps and navigational errors caused his ships to anchor instead 400 miles (640 km) to the west, off the coast of Texas. The colony survived until 1688. The present-day town of Inez is near the fort's site.
LaSallesExpeditiontoLouisiana.JPG

La Salle's Expedition to Louisiana in 1684, painted in 1844 by Theodore Gudin. La Belle is on the left, Le Joly is in the middle, and L'Aimable is grounded in the distance, right.


1745 - HMS Chester (1743 - 50), Cptn. Francis Geary, and HMS Sutherland (1741 - 50) captured privateer Elephant (1740 – 16).
HMS Chester
was a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Deptford to the dimensions laid down in the 1741 proposals of the 1719 Establishment, and launched on 18 February 1743.
Chester was sold out of the navy in 1767.
j3579.jpg



1815 - USS Constitution (44), Cptn. Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane (22), Cptn. Gordon Falcon, and sloop-of-war HMS Levant (20), Hon. George Douglas, east of Madeira.
The capture of HMS Cyane and HMS Levant
was an action which took place at the end of the Anglo-American War of 1812. The British warships HMS Cyane and HMS Levant fought USS Constitution on 20 February 1815 about 100 miles east of Madeira. Following exchanges of broadsides and musket fire, both Cyane and Levant surrendered. The war had actually finished a few days before the action with the ratification of the Treaty of Ghent by both sides, but the combatants were not aware of this.
1024px-Capture_of_H.M._Ships_Cyane_&_Levant,_by_the_U.S._Frigate_Constitution.jpg


Constitution-vs-Cyane.jpg

Constitution vs. Cyane


1857 - Norddeutscher Lloyd (NDL) (North German Lloyd), a German shipping company, was founded by Hermann Henrich Meier and Eduard Crüsemann in Bremen.
It developed into one of the most important German shipping companies of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Norddeutscher Lloyd
(NDL) (North German Lloyd) was a German shipping company. It was founded by Hermann Henrich Meier and Eduard Crüsemann in Bremen on 20 February 1857. It developed into one of the most important German shipping companies of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and was instrumental in the economic development of Bremen and Bremerhaven. On 1 September 1970, the company merged with Hamburg America Line (HAPAG) to form Hapag-Lloyd AG.
800px-Norddeutscher_Lloyd_emblem.svg.png


1897 – Launch of HMS Niobe, a ship of the Diadem class of protected cruisers in the Royal Navy
HMS Niobe
was a ship of the Diadem class of protected cruisers in the Royal Navy. She served in the Boer War and was then given to Canada as the second ship of the newly created Naval Service of Canada as HMCS Niobe. The Naval Service of Canada became the Royal Canadian Navy in August 1911. The ship was nearly lost when she went aground off Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia overnight 30–31 July 1911. Repairs were completed at the end of 1912 and the ship returned to service in late 1914. During the First World War, Niobe patrolled the approaches to the St. Lawrence River and then joined the Royal Navy's 4th Cruiser Squadron to patrol off New York City. The cruiser returned to Halifax, Nova Scotia on 17 July 1915 and never put to sea again. Niobe was paid off in September and served as a depot ship in Halifax. Damaged in the 1917 Halifax Explosion, she was sold for scrap and broken up in the 1920s.
HMCS_Niobe_LOC_08665.jpg



1920 – Death of Robert Peary, American admiral and explorer (b. 1856)
Rear Admiral Robert Edwin Peary Sr. (/ˈpɪəri/; May 6, 1856 – February 20, 1920) was an American explorer and United States Navy officer who made several expeditions to the Arctic in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He is best known for claiming to have reached the geographic North Pole with his expedition on April 6, 1909.
Robert_Peary_self-portrait,_1909.jpg
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

21st of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1654 – Launch of the Winsby, later renamed HMS Happy Return, a 44-gun fourth-rate frigate of the English Royal Navy,
The Winsby was a 44-gun fourth-rate frigate of the English Royal Navy, originally built for the navy of the Commonwealth of England at Yarmouth, and launched in February 1654. the Winsby was named for the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Winceby.
After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, she was renamed HMS Happy Return, as her name was incompatible with the restored Stuart monarchy. By 1677 her armament had been increased to 54 guns. Happy Return was captured by the French in 1691 and commissioned as French Third Rate ship of the line 'Heureux Retour' . In April 1708 recaptured by HMS Burford (70), but not re-added to English Navy
pz7576.jpg



1705 – Birth of Edward Hawke, 1st Baron Hawke, English admiral and politician (d. 1781)
Admiral of the Fleet Edward Hawke, 1st Baron Hawke, KB, PC (21 February 1705 – 17 October 1781)[1] was a Royal Navy officer. As captain of the third-rate HMS Berwick he took part in the Battle of Toulon in February 1744 during the War of the Austrian Succession. He also captured six ships of a French squadron in the Bay of Biscay in the Second Battle of Cape Finisterre in October 1747.
800px-Edward_Hawke_1.jpg


1759 - HMS Vestal (32), Cptn. Samuel Hood, took French frigate Bellona (1758 - 32) in the Channel
HMS Vestal
was one of the four 32-gun Southampton-class fifth-rate frigates of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1757 and was broken up in 1775.
b6883.jpg


j5907.jpg



1793 - HMS Alligator (1787 - 28), Cptn. William Affleck, captures the French privateer Prend Tout in the North Sea
HMS Alligator
was a 28-gun Enterprise-class sixth rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was originally ordered during the American War of Independence but was completed too late to see service during the conflict. Instead she had an active career during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.
j6325.jpg



1814 – Launch of HMS Liverpool, a Royal Navy Endymion-class frigate, reclassified as a fourth rate.
HMS Liverpool
was a Royal Navy Endymion-class frigate, reclassified as a fourth rate. She was built by Wigram, Wells and Green and launched at Woolwich on 21 February 1814. She was built of pitch-pine, which made for speedy construction at the expense of durability.
Her major service was on the East Indies Station from where in 1819 she led the successful punitive campaign against the Al Qasimi, a belligerent naval power based in Ras Al Khaimah which the British considered to be piratical. She was sold in 1822 but continued to operate in the Persian Gulf for an indefinite period thereafter.
j3863.jpg



1901 – Launch of HMS Bacchante, a Cressy-class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy
HMS Bacchante
was a Cressy-class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy around 1900. Upon completion she was assigned to the Mediterranean Fleet as flagship of the fleet's cruiser squadron. She was reduced to reserve upon her return home in 1905 before returning to the Mediterranean in 1906. Six years later she returned home and was again placed in reserve. Recommissioned at the start of World War I, Bacchante became flagship of the 7th Cruiser Squadron. She was present at the Battle of Heligoland Bight a few weeks after the war began, but saw no combat.
She was transferred to convoy escort duties in the Bay of Biscay in late 1914 before being sent to Egypt in early 1915. Bacchante was then assigned to support Anzac troops during the Gallipoli Campaign by providing naval gunfire. She covered the landing at Anzac Cove in April as well as several subsequent operations. Returning home in late 1916, she became the flagship of the 9th Cruiser Squadron on convoy escort duties off the African coast in mid-1917. Bacchante remained there for the rest of the war and was reduced to reserve in 1919 before being sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS_Bacchante.jpg



1907 - the steamship SS Berlin was driven onto the granite breakwater at the New Waterway ship canal in the Netherlands by large waves and then broke apart. Of 144 people aboard, 128 were lost.
SS Berlin
was a steel ship, which was owned by the Great Eastern Railway and built for use on their ferry service from Harwich and the Hook of Holland, which the company had initiated in 1893.
The Great Eastern Railway ordered three steamships to operate the service. The ships were named Amsterdam, Berlin, and Vienna to publicise some of the rail connections from the Hook of Holland. Berlin was built in 1894 by Earles Shipbuilding and Engineering Company of Hull. She had berths for 218 first- and 120 second-class passengers.
SS_Berlin.jpg




1914 – Launch of SMS Kronprinz, the last battleship of the four-ship König class of the German Imperial Navy.
SMS Kronprinz
was the last battleship of the four-ship König class of the German Imperial Navy. The battleship was laid down in November 1911 and launched on 21 February 1914. She was formally commissioned into the Imperial Navy on 8 November 1914, just over 4 months after the start of World War I. The name Kronprinz (Eng: "Crown Prince") refers to Crown Prince Wilhelm, and in June 1918, the ship was renamed Kronprinz Wilhelm in his honor. The battleship was armed with ten 30.5-centimeter (12.0 in) guns in five twin turrets and could steam at a top speed of 21 knots (39 km/h; 24 mph).
SMS_Kronprinz_Wilhelm_in_Scapa_Flow.jpg

SMS Kronprinz Wilhelm launched November 1914. Scuttled at Scapa Flow on on 21 June 1919.


1917 - passenger ship SS Mendi was taking members of the 5th Battalion, South African Native Labour Corps, to France.
At 05:00 hrs, while under the escort of the destroyer HMS Brisk, Mendi was struck and cut almost in half by SS Darro. Of 823 people aboard, 646 were lost.
SS
Mendi was a British 4,230 GRT passenger steamship that was built in 1905 and, as a troopship, sank after collision with great loss of life in 1917.
11.jpg

More than 800 members of the South African Native Labour Corps were on board the Mendi at the time of the disaster



1939 – Launch of HMS King George V (pennant number 41), the lead ship of the five British King George V-class battleships of the Royal Navy.
HMS King George V
(pennant number 41) was the lead ship of the five British King George V-class battleships of the Royal Navy. Laid down in 1937 and commissioned in 1940, King George V operated during the Second World War in all three major theatres of war, the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Pacific, as well as part of the British Home Fleet and Pacific Fleets. In May 1941, along with HMS Rodney, King George V was involved in the hunt for and pursuit of the German battleship Bismarck , eventually inflicting severe damage which led to the German vessel sinking. On 1 May 1942 the destroyer HMS Punjabi sank after a collision with King George V in foggy conditions. King George V took part in Operation Husky (the allied landings in Sicily) and bombarded the island of Levanzo and the port of Trapani. She also escorted part of the surrendered Italian Fleet, which included the battleships Andrea Doria and Caio Duilio, to Malta. In 1945 King George V took part in operations against the Japanese in the Pacific.
1280px-King_George_V_class_battleship_1945.jpg

HMS King George V enters Apra Harbour, Guam with sailors on deck in 1945


1945 – World War II: During the Battle of Iwo Jima, Japanese kamikaze planes sink the escort carrier USS Bismarck Sea and damage the USS Saratoga.
USS Bismarck Sea (CVE-95)
was a Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. She was launched on 17 April 1944 by Kaiser Co., Inc., Vancouver, Washington, under a Maritime Commission contract as Alikula Bay; sponsored by Mrs. M. C. Wallgren, wife of Senator Monrad Wallgren; renamed Bismarck Sea on 16 May 1944; transferred to the Navy on 20 May 1944; and commissioned the same day, with Captain J. L. Pratt in command.
USS_Bismarck_Sea_(CVE-95)_underway_on_24_June_1944_(80-G-240135).jpg
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

22nd of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1512 – Death of Amerigo Vespucci (March 9, 1454 – February 22, 1512)
Amerigo Vespucci
(March 9, 1454 – February 22, 1512) was an Italian explorer, financier, navigator, and cartographer born in the Republic of Florence. He became a naturalized citizen of the Crown of Castile in 1505.
Portrait_of_Amerigo_Vespucci.jpg


1744 - Battle of Toulon or Battle of Cape Sicié
The naval Battle of Toulon or Battle of Cape Sicié took place on 22–23 February 1744 (NS) in the Mediterranean off the French coast near Toulon. A combined Franco-Spanish fleet fought off Britain's Mediterranean Fleet. The French fleet, not officially at war with Great Britain, only joined the fighting late, when it was clear that the greatly outnumbered Spanish fleet had gained the advantage over its foe. With the French intervention, the British fleet was forced to withdraw.
Action_off_toulon_4.jpg



1765 – Launch of HMS Suffolk, a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy,
HMS Suffolk
was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 22 February 1765 at Rotherhithe. She was designed by William Bateley, based on the principles of his earlier HMS Fame, and was the only ship built to her draught.


1797 – A force of 1,400 French soldiers invaded Britain at Fishguard in support of the Society of United Irishmen. They were defeated by 500 British reservists.
The Battle of Fishguard was a military invasion of Great Britain by Revolutionary France during the War of the First Coalition. The brief campaign, on 22–24 February 1797, is the most recent landing on British soil by a hostile foreign force, and thus is often referred to as the "last invasion of Britain".
Carngwasted_&_Ebewalin.jpeg



1812 - Battle of Pirano
HMS Victorious (74), Cptn. John Talbot, and HMS Weasel (18), John William Andrew, captured French Rivoli (74), Commodore Jean-Baptiste Barré, engaged brig Mercure (16) which blew up, off Venice.

The Battle of Pirano (also known as the Battle of Grado) on 22 February 1812 was a minor naval action of the Adriatic campaign of the Napoleonic Wars fought between a British and a French ship of the line in the vicinity of the towns of Piran and Grado in Adriatic Sea. The French Rivoli, named for Napoleon's victory 15 years earlier, had been recently completed at Venice. The French naval authorities intended her to bolster French forces in the Adriatic, following a succession of defeats in the preceding year.
To prevent this ship challenging British dominance in the theatre, the Royal Navy ordered a ship of the line from the Mediterranean fleet to intercept and capture Rivoli on her maiden voyage. Captain John Talbot of HMS Victorious arrived off Venice in mid-February and blockaded the port. When Rivoliattempted to escape under cover of fog, Talbot chased her and forced her to surrender in a five-hour battle, Rivoli losing over half her crew wounded or dead.
Giovanni_Luzzo_&_Krsto_Viskovi_-_Battle_of_Pirano_(1874).jpg


Victorious_&_Rivoli.jpg

The explosion of Mercure in HMS 'Victorious' Taking the 'Rivoli', 22 February 1812 , Thomas Luny, National Maritime Museum


1845 – Launch of French Seine, a fluyt of the French Navy.
Seine was a fluyt of the French Navy. Sent to the Pacific in a time of colonial rivalry with the United Kingdom to both consolidate French positions and diplomatically ease tensions with the British, she ran aground off Balade and was wrecked. The remains of the ship have become a subject of interest for maritime archeology, notably yielding a rare example of a desalination device of the 1840s.
Durance-Francois_Roux.jpg



1892 – Launch of Placilla, a four-masted barque which was built for F. Laeisz, Hamburg, Germany
Placilla was a four-masted barque which was built for F. Laeisz, Hamburg, Germany in 1892. She was sold in 1901 and renamed Optima in 1903. In 1905 she was wrecked on the Haisborough Sands.
Jensen_Hamburger_Viermaster_Pisagua_1893.jpg



1901 - en route from Hong Kong, passenger ship SS City of Rio de Janeiro sank after striking a submerged reef at the entry to San Francisco Bay, killing more than 135 passengers and crew.
The SS City of Rio de Janeiro was an iron-hulled steam-powered passenger ship, launched in 1878, which sailed between San Francisco and various Asian Pacific ports. On 22 February 1901, the vessel sank after striking a submerged reef at the entry to San Francisco Bay while inward bound from Hong Kong. Of the approximately 220 passengers and crew on board, fewer than 85 people survived the sinking, while 135 others were killed in the catastrophe. The wreck lies in 287 feet (87 m) of water just off the Golden Gate and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as nationally significant.
City of Rio de Janeiro was one of many ships that were lost due to challenging navigational conditions in this area.
800px-CA-boys-on-board-the-city-of-rio-de-janeiro-mail-steamer-1898.jpg



1909 – Launch of HMS Vanguard, one of three St Vincent-class dreadnought battleships built for the Royal Navy
HMS Vanguard
was one of three St Vincent-class dreadnought battleships built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She spent her career assigned to the Home and Grand Fleets. Aside from participating in the Battle of Jutland in May 1916 and the inconclusive Action of 19 August several months later, her service during World War I mostly consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea.
British_Battleships_of_the_First_World_War_Q40389.jpg



1909 – The Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va., following its 14-month round-the-world cruise.
The sixteen battleships of the Great White Fleet, led by USS Connecticut, return to the United States

The Great White Fleet was the popular nickname for the powerful United States Navy battle fleet that completed a journey around the globe from 16 December 1907, to 22 February 1909, by order of United States President Theodore Roosevelt. Its mission was to make friendly courtesy visits to numerous countries, while displaying new U.S. naval power to the world.
1024px-President_Theodore_Roosevelt_-_NH_1836.jpg



1928 – Launch of HMS Sussex, one of the London sub-class of the County-class heavy cruisers in the Royal Navy
HMS Sussex
was one of the London sub-class of the County-class heavy cruisers in the Royal Navy. She was laid down by R. and W. Hawthorn, Leslie and Company, Limited, at Hebburn-on-Tyne on 1 February 1927, launched on 22 February 1928 and completed on 19 March 1929.
HMS_Sussex_(96).jpg



1931 – Launch of Amerigo Vespucci, a tall ship of the Italian Navy (Marina Militare) named after the explorer Amerigo Vespucci.
The Amerigo Vespucci is a tall ship of the Italian Navy (Marina Militare) named after the explorer Amerigo Vespucci. Its home port is LIVORNO, Italy, and it is in use as a school ship.
1280px-Amerigo_vespucci_1976_nyc_aufgetakelt.jpg

Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976

A beautiful model of the Amerigo Vespucci built in scale 1:84 by our member Joachim alias @shipshobbyist you can find here with more photos
https://shipsofscale.com/sosforums/...-th-21-st-october-2018.2050/page-7#post-43770

IMG_7311.JPG



2015 - Death of Jean Boudriot, architect,
notable historian of naval engineering, author of many mongraphies and the well known volumes of "74-Gun Ship"
Jean Pierre Paul Boudriot
, (20 March 1921 in Dijon — 22 February 2015 in Paris) was a French naval architect and notable historian of weaponry and naval engineering.
1.JPG
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

23rd of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1737 – Launch of HMS Victory, a 96-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built to the dimensions of the 1733 proposals of the 1719 Establishment at Portsmouth Dockyard, and launched on 23 February 1737.
HMS Victory
was a 96-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built to the dimensions of the 1733 proposals of the 1719 Establishment at Portsmouth Dockyard, and launched on 23 February 1737.
although commonly misconstrued to be a first rate ship, HMS Victory (1737) is in actuality a second rate due to its broadside being 96 guns a side, this would be most likely be the leader of the Vanguard of a fleet
j1791.jpg


d3816_4.jpg



1758 – Launch of HMS Shrewsbury, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Shrewsbury
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 23 February 1758 at Deptford Dockyard.
In 1783, she was condemned and scuttled.
j2904.jpg



1771 - Death of Thomas Slade - Naval architect
Sir Thomas Slade
(1703/4–1771) was an English naval architect, most famous for designing HMS Victory, Lord Nelson's flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.
Sir_Thomas_Slade.jpg


1786 – Launch of French La Réunion, a 36-gun French warship launched in 1786.
La Réunion was a 36-gun French warship launched in 1786. During the French Revolutionary War she was stationed at Cherbourgand was successfully employed harassing British merchant shipping in the English Channel until the British captured her off the Cotentin Peninsula during the action of 20 October 1793. Renamed HMS Reunion, she served for three years in the Royal Navyhelping to counter the threat from the new Batavian Navy, before she was wrecked in the Thames Estuary in December 1796.
bhc0465.jpg



1796 – Launch of HMS Cynthia, a ship sloop of unusual design, launched in 1796
HMS Cynthia
was a ship sloop of unusual design, launched in 1796. She took part in one medal-worthy boat action and participated in captures of a number of merchant vessels, was present at two notable occasions, the surrender of the Dutch fleet in the Vlieter Incident and the capture of Alexandria, and her crew participated in two land attacks on forts. She was broken up in 1809.
Design
Wells & Co. of Rotherhithe built Cynthia with a shallow draught and three daggerboards (John Schank's sliding keels) for stability. She was rated for 18 guns but during construction her rating was reduced to sixteen 6-pounder guns; she also carried fourteen half-pound swivels, although the latter were probably replaced by a much smaller number of carronades during her career.
j5120.jpg


j5113.jpg



1805 - HMS Leander (50), Cptn. John Talbot, re-captured HMS Cleopatra and took French frigate Ville de Milan (38), Cptn. Pierre Guillet.
HMS Milan
was a 38-gun fifth rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She had previously been the Ville de Milan, a 40-gun frigate of the French Navy, but served for only a year before being chased down and engaged by the smaller 32-gun frigate HMS Cleopatra. Ville de Milan defeated and captured her opponent, but suffered so much damage that she was forced to surrender without a fight several days later when both ships encountered HMS Leander, a British fourth rate. Milan went on to serve with the Royal Navy for another ten years, before being broken up in 1815, after the conclusion of the Napoleonic Wars.
pu5687.jpg



1809 - The Battle of Les Sables-d'Olonne was a minor naval battle fought off the town of Les Sables-d'Olonne on the Biscay Coast of France between a French Navy squadron of three frigates and a larger British squadron of ships of the line.
The Battle of Les Sables-d'Olonne was a minor naval battle fought on 23 February 1809 off the town of Les Sables-d'Olonne on the Biscay Coast of France between a French Navy squadron of three frigates and a larger British squadron of ships of the line. The French squadron had sailed from the port of Lorient on 23 February in an effort to link up with a fleet from Brest under Jean-Baptiste Willaumez, but missed the rendezvous and was pursued by a British blockade squadron under Rear-Admiral Robert Stopford. The French commander, Commodore Pierre Roch Jurien, anchored his squadron under the batteries which protected the town of Les Sables-d'Olonne in the hope of dissuading an attack.
79212



1855 – Launch of The second USS Niagara, a screw frigate in the United States Navy
The second USS Niagara was a screw frigate in the United States Navy.
Niagara was launched by New York Navy Yard on 23 February 1855; sponsored by Miss Annie C. O'Donnell; and commissioned on 6 April 1857, Captain William L. Hudson in command.
79223



1892 – Launch of SMS Condor ("His Majesty's Ship Condor"), an unprotected cruiser of the Imperial German Navy.
SMS Condor
("His Majesty's Ship Condor") was an unprotected cruiser of the Imperial German Navy. She was the fourth member of the Bussard class, which included five other vessels. The cruiser's keel was laid down in Hamburg in 1891, she was launched in February 1892, and was commissioned in December of that year. Intended for overseas duty, Condor was armed with a main battery of eight 10.5-centimeter (4.1 in) guns, and could steam at a speed of 15.5 knots (28.7 km/h; 17.8 mph).
SMS_Geier.jpg



1901 – Launch of Tsesarevich (Russian: Цесаревич), a pre-dreadnought battleship of the Imperial Russian Navy, built in France at the end of the 19th century
Tsesarevich (Russian: Цесаревич) was a pre-dreadnought battleship of the Imperial Russian Navy, built in France at the end of the 19th century. The ship's design formed the basis of the Russian-built Borodino-class battleships. She was based at Port Arthur, northeast China, after entering service and fought in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–1905. Tsesarevich was torpedoed during the surprise attack on Port Arthur and was repaired to become the flagship of Rear Admiral Wilgelm Vitgeft in the Battle of the Yellow Sea and was interned in Tsingtau after the battle.
79240



1942 – World War II: Japanese submarines fire artillery shells at the coastline near Santa Barbara, California.
The Bombardment of Ellwood during World War II was a naval attack by a Japanese submarine against United States coastal targets near Santa Barbara, California. Though damage was minimal, the event was key in triggering the West Coast invasion scare and influenced the decision to intern Japanese-Americans. The event also marked the first shelling of the North American mainland during the conflict.
79261

The Ellwood Oil Field and the location of the Japanese attack.
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

24th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1780 - Action of 24 February 1780
The Action of 24 February 1780 was a minor naval battle that took place off the island of Madeira during the American Revolutionary war. A French convoy was intercepted and pursued by a British Royal Navy squadron ending with the French 64 gun ship Protée being captured along with three transports.
79309

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan with stern board decoration and name, sheer lines with inboard detail and figurehead, and longitudinal half-breadth for 'Prothee' (1780), a captured French Third Rate, as fitted as a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker. Signed by George White [Master Shipwright, Portsmouth Dockyard, 1779-1793].


1783 - HMS Pallas, one of the three 36-gun Venus-class fifth-rate frigates of the Royal Navy, was burnt to avoid capture
HMS Pallas
was one of the three 36-gun Venus-class fifth-rate frigates of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1757 and served until her loss in 1783.
At 12.2.1783 she run ashore at Sao Jorge in the Azores due to leaks, so 12 days later she was burnt to avoid capture.
79319



1802 - Capture of Porcher at Calcutta
Porcher was launched in 1799 at Calcutta. She made one voyage for the British East India Company (EIC) from Bengal to England. A French privateer captured her in 1802, which gave rise to a case in French courts about the validity of the capture given the impending Treaty of Amiens. The French courts condemned her in prize and new owners in Bordeaux named her Ville de Bordeaux. The British recaptured her in 1804. Thereafter she traded between England and India as a licensed ship. In 1809 she sailed to England where in 1810 new owners renamed her Cambridge. As Cambridge she made three voyages for the EIC as an extra ship. In 1818 she was again sold with her new owners continuing to sail her to the Far East as a licensed ship. She then made two more voyages to India for the EIC. In 1840 she was sold to an American trading house at Canton, and then to the Qing Dynasty, which purchased her for the Imperial Chinese Navy. The British Royal Navy destroyed her on 27 February 1841 during the Battle of First Bar at the onset of the First Opium War.
79326

Porcher's (left) magazine detonating after an engagement with a Royal Navy squadron during the First Opium War.


1813 - USS Hornet (20), James Lawrence, sank HMS Peacock (18), Cptn. William Peake (Killed in Action), off the mouth of the Demerara River, Guiana
The sinking of HMS Peacock was a naval action fought off the mouth of the Demerara River, Guyana on 24 February 1813, between the sloop of war USS Hornet and the Cruizer-class brig-sloop HMS Peacock. After an exchange of broadsides, Hornet was able to rake Peacock, forcing her to strike. Peacock was so badly damaged that she sank shortly after surrendering.
79338



1815 – Launch of HMS Wellesley, a 74-gun third rate, named after the Duke of Wellington,
HMS Wellesley
was a 74-gun third rate, named after the Duke of Wellington, and launched in 1815. She captured Karachi for the British, and participated in the First Opium War, which resulted in Britain gaining control of Hong Kong. Thereafter she served primarily as a training ship before gaining the distinction of being the last British ship of the line to be sunk by enemy action and the only one to have been sunk by an air-raid.
79354

Wellesley sailing along a rocky coastline


1875 – The SS Gothenburg hits the Great Barrier Reef and sinks off the Australian east coast, killing approximately 100, including a number of high-profile civil servants and dignitaries.
The SS Gothenburg was a steamship that operated along the British and then later the Australian and New Zealand coastlines. In February 1875, she left Darwin, Australia en route to Adelaide when she encountered a cyclone-strength storm off the north Queensland coast. The ship was wrecked on the Great Barrier Reef north-west of Holbourne Island on 24 February 1875. Survivors in one of the lifeboats were rescued two days later by Leichhardt, while the occupants of two other lifeboats that managed to reach Holbourne Island were rescued several days later. Twenty-two men survived, while between 98 and 112 others died, including a number of high-profile civil servants and dignitaries.
79365

SS Gothenburg docked at Port Adelaide wharf after her lengthening in 1873.


1887 – Launch of Spanish Reina Regente was a Reina Regente-class protected cruiser of the Spanish Navy
Reina Regente was a Reina Regente-class protected cruiser of the Spanish Navy. Entering service in 1888, she was lost in 1895 during a storm in the Gulf of Cádiz while she was travelling from Tangier, Morocco to Cádiz, Spain.
79367
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

25th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1758 – Launch of HMS Lenox, a 74-gun Dublin-class third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy,
HMS Lenox
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 25 February 1758 at Chatham Dockyard.
She was sunk as a breakwater in 1784.
79454

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the profile (no waterlines) with some inboard detail, and a superimposed longitudinal half-breadth for Sandwich (1759), a 90-gun Second Rate, three-decker, building at Chatham Dockyard. Reverse: Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the sheer lines with some inboard detail, and a superimposed basic longitudinal half-breadth for (possibly) Lenox (1758), a 70-gun (later 74-gun) Third Rate, two-decker, building at Chatham Dockyard.

The Dublin-class ships of the line were a class of seven 74-gun third rates, designed for the Royal Navy by Sir Thomas Slade.
Design
The Dublin-class ships were the first 74-gun ships to be designed for the Royal Navy, and marked the beginning of a more dynamic era of naval design than that in the ultra-conservative Establishment era preceding it.
Slade's draught was approved on 26 August 1755 when the first two orders were transmitted to Deptford Dockyard. The design was some 4½ feet longer than the preceding 70-gun ships of the 1745 Establishment, with the extra length making provision for an additional (14th) pair of 32-pounder guns on the lower deck compared with the 13 pairs of the 70-gun ships. They were nominally ordered as 70-gun ships (although always designed to carry 74), but redesignated as 74-gun during construction.


1781 - The Action of 25 February 1781
was a small naval engagement which was fought off Cape Finisterre between a Spanish naval frigate sixth rate Graña of thirty guns and a Royal Naval fifth rate frigate HMS Cerberus of thirty two guns.

The Action of 25 February 1781 was a small naval engagement which was fought off Cape Finisterre between a Spanish navalfrigate sixth rate Graña of thirty guns and a Royal Naval fifth rate frigate HMS Cerberus of thirty two guns. The British were victorious when Graña surrendered after a hard fight.
On 25 February 1781, whilst cruising twenty leagues off Cape Finisterre, the Royal Naval frigate HMS Cerberus of thirty two guns under Captain Robert Mann sighted the Spanish twenty gun frigate Graña, under Don Nicolás de Medina.
79459
Captain Robert Mann


1798 - British hired 12-gun cutter HMS Marechel de Coburg (1794) sunk French Privateer 16-gun lugger 'Revanche' (1797)
On the 25th of February 1798, at 7 a.m., Cromer, bearing west-south-west, distant 16 leagues, the British hired armed cutter Marquis-Cobourg, of twelve 4-pounders and 66 men and boys, Lieutenant Charles Webb, alter a nine hours chase and a run of 100 miles, during half the time before a hard sale of wind at west-north-west, came up with the French lugger-privateer Revanche, of 16 guns and 62 men: and to a smart fire from whose musketry and stern-chasers the Cobourg had been exposed for the last two hours of the nine. A spirited action now ensued, during which the lugger made two attempts to board the cutter, but was repulsed. After a two hours' running fight, close alongside, a well-directed broadside from the Cobourg shot away the Revanche's main and mizzen masts by the hoard and also her fore-yard: whereupon the privateer's men called for quarter.


1813 - HMS Linnet (14), Lt. John Tracey, taken by French frigate Gloire (40), Cptn Albin-Réné Roussin, in the Channel.
Linnet was sailing in the western approaches to the Channel on 25 February 1813 in high winds and heavy seas. She sighted a large vessel that proceeded to give chase, and did not identify itself. By 1430 hours, the frigate had gotten close enough to Linnet to identify herself as the Gloire, and to call on Lieutenant John Tracey to surrender. Instead, Tracey managed by adroit sailing to hold off his attacker for over an hour until shots from Gloire did sufficient damage to Linnet's rigging forcing Tracy to surrender. The court martial of Lieutenant Tracy on 31 May 1814 for the loss of his vessel acquitted him, noting his seamanship, courage, judgment, and his attempt to disable the enemy vessel. The Navy subsequently promoted Tracey to the rank of commander.
79472

Scale: unknown. A contemporary full hull model of the French 40-gun frigate ‘La Gloire’ built plank on frame and mounted on its original wooden marquetry baseboard.


1814 - HMS Eurotas (38), Cptn. John Phillimore, captured Clorinde (42) about 250 miles south of Cape Clear
Clorinde was a 40-gun Pallas-class frigate of the French Navy, designed by Sané. The British Royal Navy captured her in 1814 and renamed her HMS Aurora. After 19 years as a coal hulk she was broken up in 1851.
79476

Clorinde fighting HMS Eurotas


1843 – Lord George Paulet occupies the Kingdom of Hawaii in the name of Great Britain in the Paulet Affair (1843).
The Paulet affair
was the five-month occupation of the Hawaiian Islands in 1843 by British naval officer Captain Lord George Paulet, of HMS Carysfort.
79483
Lord George Paulet, instigator of the Paulet Affair


1911 – Launch of The Peking,
a steel-hulled four-masted barque. A so-called Flying P-Liner of the German company F. Laeisz, it was one of the last generation of cargo-carrying windjammers used in the nitrate trade and wheat trade around Cape Horn.

The Peking is a steel-hulled four-masted barque. A so-called Flying P-Liner of the German company F. Laeisz, it was one of the last generation of cargo-carrying windjammers used in the nitrate trade and wheat trade around Cape Horn.
79486
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

26th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1606 – The Janszoon voyage of 1605–06 becomes the first European expedition to sight Australia, although it is mistaken as a part of New Guinea.
Willem Janszoon made the first recorded European landing on the Australian continent in 1606, sailing from Bantam, Java, in the Duyfken. As an employee of the Dutch East India Company (Dutch: Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or VOC), Janszoon had been instructed to explore the coast of New Guinea in search of economic opportunities. He had originally arrived in Dutch East Indies from the Netherlands in 1598 and became an officer of the VOC on its establishment in 1602.
79681



1708 – Launch of HMS Falmouth, a 50-gun fourth-rate ship of the line built for the Royal Navy
HMS Falmouth
was a 50-gun fourth-rate ship of the line built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 18th century. The ship participated in several battles during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–15) and the War of Jenkins' Ear (1739–48).
f5864_003.jpg



1749 – Launch of Spanish Fénix, an 80-gun ship-of-the-line of the Spanish Navy,
Fénix was an 80-gun ship-of-the-line of the Spanish Navy, launched in 1749. In 1759, she was sent to bring the new king, Carlos III, from Naples to Barcelona. When Spain entered the American Revolutionary War in June 1779, Fénix set sail for the English Channel where she was to join a Franco-Spanish fleet of more than 60 ships-of-the-line under Lieutenant General Luis de Córdova y Córdova. The Armada of 1779 was an invasion force of 40,000 troops with orders to capture the British naval base at Portsmouth.
79600


79605



1795 – French schooner Coureuse captured
HMS Coureuse
was a schooner launched in 1785 or 1788 in the United States and acquired and armed at Lorient in 1794. The British captured her in 1795 and the Royal Navy briefly used her as a dispatch vessel in the Mediterranean. The Admiralty sold her in 1799.
79611



1815 - HMS St. Lawrence (12) taken by American privateer brig Chasseur (14), Cptn. Thomas Boyle, off Havana.
HMS St Lawrence
was a 14-gun schooner of the Royal Navy. She had been built in 1808 in St. Michaels, Talbot County, Marylandfor Thomas Tennant and sold to Philadelphians in 1810. During the War of 1812 she was the American privateer Atlas. The British captured her in 1813 and renamed her St Lawrence. The American privateer Chasseur recaptured her in 1815, and then HMS Acasta re-recaptured her.
79645

Chasseur capturing HMS St Lawrence, by Adam Weingartner


1852 - HMS Birkenhead – The troopship struck a rock near Cape Town on 26 February 1852 while ferrying troops to the 8th Xhosa War. The ship sank with the loss of 450 men.
HMS Birkenhead
, also referred to as HM Troopship Birkenhead or Steam Frigate Birkenhead, was one of the first iron-hulled ships built for the Royal Navy. She was designed as a steam frigate, but was converted to a troopship before being commissioned.
She was wrecked on 26 February 1852, while transporting troops to Algoa Bay at Danger Point near Gansbaai, 87 miles (140 kilometres) from Cape Town, South Africa. There were not enough serviceable lifeboats for all the passengers, and the soldiers famously stood firm on board, thereby allowing the women and children to board the boats safely and escape the sinking.
79646


79647

The Wreck of the Birkenhead (1901) by Charles Dixon.


1861 – Launch of French Ville de Lyon, a Ville de Nantes-class 90-gun ship of the line of the French Navy
Ville de Lyon was a Ville de Nantes-class 90-gun ship of the line of the French Navy.
Ville de Lyon conducted trials in 1861 before being put in ordinary in 1862. She took part in the French intervention in Mexico, and upon her return to France, became a schoolship in Brest. She returned to Mexico in 1866 to ferry an infantry regiment back to France.
After the Paris Commune, Ville de Lyon was used as a prison hulk in Brest. Struck in 1879, she was broken up in 1894.
79653

Launching of the 90-gun ship of the line Ville de Nantes before Napoléon III.


1891 – Launch of HMS Royal Sovereign, the lead ship of the seven ships in her class of pre-dreadnought battleships
HMS Royal Sovereign
was the lead ship of the seven ships in her class of pre-dreadnought battleships built for the Royal Navy in the 1890s. The ship was commissioned in 1892 and served as the flagship of the Channel Fleet for the next five years. She was transferred to the Mediterranean Fleet in 1897 and returned home in 1902, and was briefly assigned as a coast guard ship before she began a lengthy refit in 1903–1904. Royal Sovereign was reduced to reserve in 1905 and was taken out of service in 1909. The ship was sold for scrap four years later and subsequently broken up in Italy.
79657



1914 – Launch of HMHS Britannic, sister to the RMS Titanic, at Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast.
HMHS Britannic
(/brɪˈtænɪk/) was the third and final vessel of the White Star Line's Olympic class of steamships and the second to bear the name "Britannic." She was the fleet mate of both the RMS Olympic and the RMS Titanic and was intended to enter service as a transatlantic passenger liner.
Britannic was launched just before the start of the First World War. She was designed to be the safest of the three ships with design changes actioned during construction due to lessons learned from the sinking of the Titanic. She was laid up at her builders, Harland and Wolff, in Belfast for many months before being put to use as a hospital ship in 1915. In 1915 and 1916 she served between the United Kingdom and the Dardanelles. On the morning of 21 November 1916 she was shaken by an explosion caused by a naval mine near the Greek island of Kea and foundered 55 minutes later, killing 30 people.
There were 1,065 people on board; the 1,035 survivors were rescued from the water and lifeboats. Britannic was the largest ship lost in the First World War. The loss of the ship was compensated by the award of SS Bismarck to the White Star Line as part of post-war reparations; she became the RMS Majestic.
The wreck was located and explored by Jacques-Yves Cousteau in 1975. The vessel is the largest passenger ship on the sea floor
1280px-HMHS_Britannic.jpg


79671

Britannic under construction at Harland & Wolff, 1914


1916 - French auxiliary cruiser La Provence was taking troops from France to Salonika when U-35 sank her in the Mediterranean south of Cape Matapan. Nearly 1,000 men were lost
SS La Provence
was an ocean liner and auxiliary cruiser torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean Sea on 26 February 1916. She belonged to the French Compagnie Générale Transatlantique.
79677
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

27th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1630 – Birth of Roche Braziliano, Dutch pirate (d. 1671)
Roche Braziliano
(sometimes spelled Rock, Roch, Roc, Roque, Brazilliano, or Brasiliano) (c. 1630 – disappeared c. 1671) was a Dutchpirate born in the town of Groningen. His pirate career lasted from 1654 until his disappearance around 1671. He was first made famous in Alexandre Exquemelin's 1678 book The Buccaneers of America; Exquemelin did not know Braziliano's real name, but historians have found he was probably born as Gerrit Gerritszoon and that he and his parents moved to Dutch-controlled Brazil. He is known as "Roche Braziliano", which in English translates to "Rock the Brazilian", due to his long exile in Brazil.
79706


1742 – Launch of HMS Wolf, a 14-gun snow-rigged sloop of the Royal Navy, as the first of three Wolf class sloops constructed for action against Spanish privateers during the War of Jenkins' Ear.
HMS Wolf
was a 14-gun snow-rigged sloop of the Royal Navy, launched in 1742 as the first of three Wolf class sloops constructed for action against Spanish privateers during the War of Jenkins' Ear.
79711



1780 - storeship HMS Leviathan, ex HMS Northumberland, foundered while returning home from Jamaica.
HMS Northumberland
was a 70-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Plymouth Dockyard to the draught specified by the 1745 Establishment, and launched on 1 December 1750.
During the Seven Years' War Northumberland was the flagship of Lord Alexander Collville from 1753 to 1762, and under the captaincy of William Adams until 1760 and Nathaniel Bateman from 1760 to 1762. Future explorer James Cook served as ship's master from 1759 to 1761.
Northumberland was later classified as a storeship and was renamed HMS Leviathan on 13 September 1777. She foundered on 27 February 1780 whilst sailing from Jamaica to Britain.
79714



1804 – Launch of HMS Eagle, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy,
HMS Eagle
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 27 February 1804 at Northfleet.
On 11 November 1804, Glatton, together with Eagle, Majestic, Princess of Orange, Raisonable, Africiane, Inspector, Beaver, and the hired armed vessels Swift and Agnes, shared in the capture of the Upstalsboom, H.L. De Haase, Master.
In 1830 she was reduced to a 50-gun ship, and became a training ship in 1860. She was renamed HMS Eaglet in 1919, when she was the Royal Naval Reserve training centre for North West England. A fire destroyed Eagle in 1926
79717



1806 - HMS Hydra (38), Cptn. George Mundy, captured French national brig Le Furet (18), Lt. Demay, off Cadiz
79727


79718

1/36th scale model of Cygne, sister-ship of Furet, on display at the Musée national de la Marine in Paris.


1809 – Action of 27 February 1809: Captain Bernard Dubourdieu captures HMS Proserpine
The Action of 27 February 1809 was a minor naval engagement during the French Revolutionary Wars. Two 44-gun frigates, Pénélope and Pauline, sortied from Toulon harbour to chase a British frigate, HMS Proserpine, which was conduction surveillance of French movements. First sneaking undetected and later trying to pass herself as a British frigate coming to relieve Proserpine, Pénélope approached within gun range before being identified. With the help of Pauline, she subdued Proserpine and forced her to surrender after a one-hour fight.
79731

Capture of HMS Proserpine by Pénélope and Pauline. Watercolour by Antoine Roux.

79732

Proserpine represented after her captured (the mizzen was actually more seriously damaged). Watercolour by Antoine Roux.


1855 – Launch of HMS Victor Emmanuel, a screw-propelled 91-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, originally launched as HMS Repulse, but renamed shortly after being launched.
HMS Victor Emmanuel
was a screw-propelled 91-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, originally launched as HMS Repulse, but renamed shortly after being launched.
Construction and commissioning
Victor Emmanuel was an Agamemnon-class ship of the line, a class originally designed as 80-gun sailing two-deckers. They were re-ordered as screw ships in 1849, and Victor Emmanuel was duly reclassified as a 91-gun ship on 26 March 1852. She was built and launched on 27 February 1855 under the name HMS Repulse, but was renamed Victor Emmanuel on 7 December 1855, in honour of Victor Emmanuel after he visited the ship. She cost a total of £158,086, with £87,597 spent on her hull, and a further £35,588 spent on her machinery.
79739


l0694.jpg



1861 – Launch of HMS Black Prince, the third ship of that name to serve with the Royal Navy.
She was the world's second ocean-going, iron-hulled, armoured warship, following her sister ship, HMS Warrior.
HMS Black Prince
was the third ship of that name to serve with the Royal Navy. She was the world's second ocean-going, iron-hulled, armoured warship, following her sister ship, HMS Warrior. For a brief period the two Warrior-class ironclads were the most powerful warships in the world, being virtually impregnable to the naval guns of the time. Rapid advances in naval technology left Black Prince and her sister obsolete within a short time, however, and she spent more time in reserve and training roles than in first-line service.
Black Prince spent her active career with the Channel Fleet and was hulked in 1896, becoming a harbour training ship in Queenstown, Ireland. She was renamed Emerald in 1903 and then Impregnable III in 1910 when she was assigned to the training establishment in Plymouth. The ship was sold for scrap in 1923.
79742



1869 – Launch of HMS Volage, a Volage-class corvette built for the Royal Navy in the late 1860s.
HMS Volage
was a Volage-class corvette built for the Royal Navy in the late 1860s. She spent most of her first commission assigned to the Flying Squadron circumnavigating the world and later carried a party of astronomers to the Kerguelen Islands to observe the transit of Venus in 1874. The ship was then assigned as the senior officer's ship in South American waters until she was transferred to the Training Squadron during the 1880s. Volage was paid off in 1899 and sold for scrap in 1904.
l0824.jpg



1916 - SS Maloja was an M-class passenger steamship of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company was sunk by a mine in the English Channel off Dover with the loss of 155 lives
SS Maloja
was an M-class passenger steamship of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company. She was completed in 1911 and worked a regular route between Great Britain and India. In 1916 in the First World War she was sunk by a mine in the English Channel off Dover with the loss of 155 lives.
79754



1942 - Seaplane tender USS Langley (AV 3), carrying 32 U.S. Army Air Force P-40 aircraft for the defense of Java, is bombed by Japanese naval land attack planes 75 miles south of Tjilatjap, Java. Due to the damage, Langley is shelled and torpedoed by USS Whipple (DD 217).
USS Langley (CV-1/AV-3)
was the United States Navy's first aircraft carrier, converted in 1920 from the collier USS Jupiter (AC-3), and also the US Navy's first turbo-electric-powered ship. Conversion of another collier was planned but canceled when the Washington Naval Treaty required the cancellation of the partially built Lexington-class battlecruisers Lexington and Saratoga, freeing up their hulls for conversion to the aircraft carriers Lexington and Saratoga. Langley was named after Samuel Pierpont Langley, an American aviation pioneer. Following another conversion to a seaplane tender, Langley fought in World War II. On 27 February 1942, she was attacked by nine twin-engine Japanese bombers of the Japanese 21st and 23rd Naval Air Flotillas[2] and so badly damaged that she had to be scuttled by her escorts.
79759

USS Langley underway, 1927


1942 – Battle of the Java Sea
The Battle of the Java Sea begins, where the 14-ship Allied forces (American, Dutch, British and Australian) attempt to stop the 28-ship Japanese invasion of the Dutch East Indies colony of Java. The Japanese, during battles over three days, decimates the Allied forces, sinking at least 11 ships, killing more than 3,370 and taking nearly 1,500 prisoners.
79761

Bombs from a Japanese aircraft falling near the Dutch light cruiser Java in the Gaspar Strait east of Sumatra, Dutch East Indies, on 15 February 1942.


1942 - HNLMS De Ruyter was sunk in the Battle of the Java Sea in 1942. 345 of the crew were killed.
HNLMS De Ruyter
(Dutch: Hr.Ms. De Ruyter) was a unique light cruiser of the Royal Netherlands Navy. She was originally designed as a 5,000-long-ton (5,100 t) ship with a lighter armament due to financial problems and the pacifist movement. Later in the design stage, an extra gun turret was added and the armor was improved. She was the seventh ship of the Dutch Navy to be named after Admiral Michiel Adriaenszoon de Ruyter.
De Ruyter was laid down on 16 September 1933 at the Wilton-Fijenoord dockyard in Schiedam and commissioned on 3 October 1936, commanded by Captain A. C. van der Sande Lacoste. She was sunk in the Battle of the Java Sea in 1942.
79768



1945 – Launch of HMCS Bonaventure, a Majestic-class aircraft carrier, the third and last aircraft carrier in service with Canada's armed forces.
The aircraft carrier was initially ordered for construction by Britain's Royal Navy as HMS Powerful during the Second World War.

79773



2004 - SuperFerry 14 – an Islamist terrorist attack resulted in the sinking of the ferry SuperFerry 14 and the deaths of 116 people in the Philippines. It is regarded as the World's deadliest terrorist attack at sea.
The 2004 SuperFerry 14 bombing on February 27, 2004, was a terrorist attack that resulted in the sinking of the ferry SuperFerry 14 and the deaths of 116 people in the Philippines' deadliest terrorist attack and the world's deadliest terrorist attack at sea. Six children less than five years old, and nine children between six and 16 years of age were among the dead or missing, including six students on a championship team sent by schools in northern Mindanao to compete in a journalism contest.
79775


 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

28th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1758 - HMS Monmouth (64), Cptn. Arthur Gardiner (Killed in Action), and HMS Swiftsure (70), Cptn. Stanhope, took Foudroyant (80) off Toulon.
The Foudroyant was an 80-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. She was later captured and served in the Royal Navy as the Third Rate HMS Foudroyant.
79844

Capture of the Foudroyant by the British Monmouth, 28 February 1758. Painting by Francis Swaine, 1725–1782.


1758 - HMS Montagu and HMS Monarch (74), Cptn. John Montagu, drove ashore French Oriflamme (50) near Cape de Gato
Oriflamme was a 56-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. She was ordered on 16 February 1743 and built at Toulon Dockyard by engineer-constructor Pierre-Blaise Coulomb, and launched on 30 October 1744. She carried 24 x 18-pounder guns on her lower deck, 26 x 8-pounder guns on her upper deck, and 6 x 4-pounder guns on her quarterdeck (although the latter smaller guns were removed when she was rebuilt at Toulon from August 1756 to July 1757). The ship was named for the long, multi-tailed red banner that was historically the battle standard of the medieval French monarchy.
79863

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the stern board with one half illustrating the decoration detail, the starboard quarter gallery with decoration, and the figurehead for 'Monarch' (1747), a captured French Third Rate, as taken off prior to fitting as a 74-gun Third Rate, two-decker. NMM, Progress Book, volume 2, folio 54, states that 'Monarch' arrived at Portsmouth Dockyard on 29 October 1747 and was docked on 2 June 1748. She was undocked on 3 June 1748 having been surveyed. The Admiralty Order dated 25 November 1747 to survey the ship was cancelled on 5 July 1748. A new Admiralty Order dated 8 July 1748 was sent to survey and cost the repairs. She was re-docked on 13 December 1748 and undocked on 28 March 1749 having undergone small repairs and being fitted.


1760 - Battle of Bishops Court
British squadron, under Cptn. Elliot, defeated a French squadron, under François Thurot (Killed in Action), off the Isle of Man.

The Battle of Bishops Court, also known as The Defeat of Thurot, was a naval engagement that took place 28 February 1760, during the Seven Years' War, between three British ships and three French ships. The French force under famed commander François Thurot were brought to battle in the Irish sea between the Isle of Man and the coast of Ireland at 9 am. After a close-fought action, Thurot's force was battered into submission, with his ships dismasted and reduced to a sinking condition. Thurot was shot through the heart and died during the action. The British took all three French ships, completing victory.
79864



1778 – Launch of French Courageuse, a 12-pounder Concorde class frigate of the French Navy
Courageuse was a 12-pounder Concorde class frigate of the French Navy. She was launched in 1778. The British captured her in 1799 and thereafter used her as a receiving ship or prison hulk at Malta before breaking her up in 1802.
IMG_15051.jpg



1797 - HMS Terpsichore (32), Cptn. Sir Richard Bowen, engaged Santissima Trinidad (136) damaged at the Battle of Cape St. Vincent
HMS Terpsichore
was a 32-gun Amazon-class fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was built during the last years of the American War of Independence, but did not see action until the French Revolutionary Wars. She served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, in a career that spanned forty-five years.
Terpsichore was launched in 1785, but was not prepared for active service until the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars in 1793. She was initially sent to serve in the West Indies where in 1794 Captain Richard Bowen took command. Bowen commanded Terpsichore until his death in 1797, and several of her most memorable exploits occurred during his captaincy. Terpsichore served mostly in the Mediterranean, capturing three frigates, and in 1797 went as far as to attack the damaged Spanish first rate Santísima Trinidad, as she limped away from the Battle of Cape St Vincent. The Santísima Trinidad mounted 136 guns to Terpsichore's 32, and was the largest warship in the world at time. Terpsichore inflicted several casualties, before abandoning the attack. Terpsichore passed through several commanders after Bowen's death at Tenerife, and went out to the East Indies, where her last commander was Captain William Augustus Montagu. Montagu fought an action with a large French frigate in 1808, and though he was able to outfight her, he was not able to capture her. Terpsichore returned to Britain the following year, and spent the last years of the war laid up in ordinary. She survived in this state until 1830, when she was broken up.
79874

Model of the Santísima Trinidad at the Museo Naval de Madrid


1799 - Action of 28 February 1799
HMS Sybille (44), Cptn. Edward Cooke (Killed in Action) captured French frigate Forte, Cptn. Beaulieu-Leloup, off Bengal River

The Action of 28 February 1799 was a minor naval engagement of the French Revolutionary Wars, fought off the mouth of the Hooghly River in the Bay of Bengal between the French frigate Forte and the Royal Navy frigate HMS Sybille. Forte was an exceptionally large and powerful ship engaged on a commerce raiding operation against British merchant shipping off the port of Calcutta in British India. To eliminate this threat, Sybille was sent from Madras in pursuit. Acting on information from released prisoners, Edward Cooke, captain of Sybille, was sailing off Balasore when distant gunfire alerted him to the presence of Forte on the evening of 28 February. The French frigate was discovered at anchor in the sandbanks at the mouth of the Hooghly with two recently captured British merchant ships.
79876

Capture of 'La Forte', 28 February 1799 (Print) (PAD5620)


1804 – Launch of HMS Aeolus was a 32-gun Amphion-class fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy.
HMS Aeolus
was a 32-gun Amphion-class fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1801 and served in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and the War of 1812.
Ordered during the last years of the French Revolutionary Wars, Aeolus was at first engaged in convoy work, before being sent out to the West Indies, where she took part in operations off Saint-Domingue and blockaded the French ships in the harbours. She was involved in the chase of the 74-gun Duquesne after she put to sea, and assisted in her capture. Aeolus returned to operate off the British coast, and was part of Sir Richard Strachan's squadron in late 1805. The squadron encountered part of the fleeing Franco-Spanish fleet that Nelson had decisively defeated two weeks previously at the Battle of Trafalgar, and after bringing them to battle, captured the entire force.
After spending time off Ireland and North America, Aeolus was in the Caribbean in 1809, and took part in the capture of Martinique. Deployed with Captain Philip Broke's squadron after the outbreak of the War of 1812 Aeolus took part in the capture of USS Nautilus, the first ship either side lost in the war, the pursuit of USS Constitution and the capture of the American privateer Snapper. Aeolus was used as a storeship at Quebec after the end of the war, and after returning to Britain was laid up as the Napoleonic Wars drew to a close. She was finally sold in 1817.
79941



1814 - HMS Anacreon Sloop (16), John Davies, foundered in the Channel.
HMS Anacreon
had an extremely brief career. she was commissioned in early 1813 and was lost within a year.
Career: Commander John Davies supposedly commissioned her in May 1813, but she had apparently already been in service by then. On 9 April 1813 Eleanor Wilhelmina arrived at Yarmouth. Anacreon had detained Eleanor Wilhelmina as she was sailing from North Bergen. Davies then sailed Anacreon for Lisbon on 3 August.
On 1 February 1814 she recaptured the Spanish ship Nostra Senora del Carmen la Sirena. Late in January the French privateer Lion had captured three ships in all and plundered two, which she had permitted to go on to Lisbon. Anacreon had recaptured the third, Nostra Senora..., and then had set off in pursuit of the privateer.
Loss: Anacreon foundered in the Channel on 28 February 1814 during a storm as she was returning from Lisbon. All aboard were lost.
79880



1844 - An experimental 12-inch gun explodes on board USS Princeton, killing Secretary of State (former Secretary of the Navy) Abel P. Upshur, Secretary of the Navy Thomas W. Gilmer, and five other dignitaries and injuring 20 people.
The first USS Princeton was a screw steam warship in the United States Navy. Commanded by Captain Robert F. Stockton, Princeton was launched on September 5, 1843.
79894



1854 - Launch of French Louis XIV, an Océan-class 118-gun ship of the line of the French Navy
Louis XIV was an Océan-class 118-gun ship of the line of the French Navy.
Laid down as Tonnant in 1811 at Rochefort, she was renamed Louis-XIV in 1828, still on keel. She was launched only in 1854, and was put in the reserve the next year.
Ocean_class_ship_of_the_line.jpg



1890 - British-India Steam Navigation Company ship RMS Quetta on a regular route between Great Britain, India and the Far East.
She was wrecked on the Far North Queensland coast on 28 February 1890. Of 292 people aboard, 134 were lost.
RMS
Quetta was a Royal Mail Ship that was wrecked on the Far North Queensland coast of Australia on 28 February 1890. Quetta's sinking killed 134 of the 292 people on board, making it one of Queensland's biggest maritime catastrophes.
79915



1893 – Launch of the USS Indiana, the lead ship of her class and the first battleship in the United States Navy comparable to foreign battleships of the time
USS Indiana (BB-1)
was the lead ship of her class and the first battleship in the United States Navy comparable to foreign battleships of the time. Authorized in 1890 and commissioned five years later, she was a small battleship, though with heavy armor and ordnance. The ship also pioneered the use of an intermediate battery. She was designed for coastal defense and as a result, her decks were not safe from high waves on the open ocean.
79918



1942 – The Battle of Sunda Strait
The heavy cruiser USS Houston is sunk in the Battle of Sunda Strait with 693 crew members killed, along with HMAS Perth which lost 375 men.

The Battle of Sunda Strait was a naval battle which occurred during World War II in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java, and Sumatra. On the night of 28 February – 1 March 1942, the Australian light cruiser HMAS Perth and the American heavy cruiserUSS Houston faced a major Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) task force. After a fierce battle of several hours duration, both Alliedships were sunk. Five Japanese ships were sunk, three of them by friendly fire.
79930

USS Houston (CA 30), off San Diego, California, in October 1935, with President Franklin D. Roosevelt on board. She is flying an admiral's four-star flag at her foremast peak, and the Presidential flag at her mainmast peak.
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

29th of February

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1812 - HMS Fly (16), Henry Higman, wrecked on the Knobber reef at the eastern end of Anholt Is. in the Kattegat
HMS Fly (1805) was a 16-gun brig-sloop launched in 1805. Due to the pilot's error of judgment she wrecked on 28 February 1812 on the Knobber Reef, a narrow spit of sand and large boulders that extends 4.4 miles (7.1 km) from the eastern end of Anholt Island. Boats from the Baltic Fleet rescued her crew.
79950



1828 – Launch of Emma, a River Flat along the Mersey and Irwell Navigation, in Manchester.
The Emma was a River Flat launched on 29 February 1828 along the Mersey and Irwell Navigation, in Manchester. Built by the New Quay Company, it was one of the largest cargo vessels to be built alongside the Irwell. The vessel capsized shortly after its launch, causing the deaths of as many as 47 of its estimated 200 passengers. Many others were rescued by bystanders, and treated by surgeons along the river banks. The Emma was eventually righted, and spent the rest of its life working along the River Weaver.


1916 - During the Action German merchant raider SMS Greif (1914) and British armed merchant cruiser RMS Alcantara (1913) sank each other northeast of Shetland. An estimated 187 Germans perished along with 72 Britons.
The Action of 29 February 1916 was a naval engagement fought during the First World War between the United Kingdom and the German Empire. SMS Greif a German commerce raider, broke out into the North Sea and Admiral Sir John Jellicoe dispatched Royal Navy warships to intercept the raider. Four British vessels made contact with the Greif and in the ensuing encounter, the commerce raider and the armed merchant cruiser HMS Alcantara were sunk.
Alcantara_1916.jpg
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

1st of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1579 - Sir Francis Drake on Golden Hind captures the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de la Concepción - nickname Cacafuego ("fireshitter")
Nuestra Señora de la Concepción (Spanish: "Our Lady of the (Immaculate) Conception") was a 120-ton Spanish galleon that sailed the PeruPanama trading route during the 16th century. This ship has earned a place in maritime history not only by virtue of being Sir Francis Drake's most famous prize, but also because of her colourful nickname, Cacafuego ("fireshitter").
79994



1805 – Launch of Topaze, a Gloire-class 44-gun frigate of the French Navy.
Topaze was a Gloire-class 44-gun frigate of the French Navy. The British captured her in 1809 and she the served with the Royal Navy under the name Jewel, and later Alcmene until she was broken up in 1816.
80000



1819 – Launch of USS Columbus, a 90-gun ship of the line in the United States Navy.
USS Columbus
was a 90-gun ship of the line in the United States Navy. She was launched on 1 March 1819 by Washington Navy Yard and commissioned on 7 September 1819, Master Commandant J. H. Elton in command.
History
Clearing Norfolk, Virginia on 28 April 1820, Columbus served as flagship for Commodore William Bainbridge in the Mediterraneanuntil returning to Boston on 23 July 1821. Serving as a receiving ship after 1833, she remained at Boston in ordinary until sailing to the Mediterranean on 29 August 1842, as flagship for Commodore Charles W. Morgan. On 24 February 1843, she sailed from Genoa, Italy, and reached Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 29 July to become flagship of the Brazil Squadron, Commodore Daniel Turner. She returned to New York City on 27 May 1844 for repairs.

80009

The USS Columbus (1819) and a crewman in Edo Bay in 1846.

80010

Sailmaker's plan of USS Columbus


1865 - Side-wheel steamship USS Harvest Moon, while underway near Georgetown, S.C., with Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren on board, hits a Confederate mine (or "torpedo" in contemporary terms) and sinks with the loss of one of her crew.
The USS Harvest Moon was a steam operated gunboat acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. She was used by the Navy to patrol navigable waterways of the Confederacy to prevent the South from trading with other countries.
80013

USS Harvest Moon in 1864-1865


1873 – Launch of HMS Raleigh, an unarmoured iron or "sheathed" masted frigate completed in 1874
HMS Raleigh
was an unarmoured iron or "sheathed" masted frigate completed in 1874. She was one of a series of three designed by Sir Edward Reed. The other two iron-hulled frigates (the three were not sisters) were HMS Inconstant and HMS Shah. The Controller originally intended to build six of these big frigates, but only three were ordered in view of their high cost. They retained the traditional broadside layout of armament, with a full rig of masts and sails. Although widely believed to be named after Sir Walter Raleigh, the ship was in fact named for George of Raleigh.
80018



1881 – Launch of SS Servia, also known as RMS Servia, a successful transatlantic passenger and mail steamer of revolutionary design
SS Servia, also known as RMS Servia, was a successful transatlantic passenger and mail steamer of revolutionary design, built by J & G Thomson of Clydebank (later John Brown & Company) and launched in 1881. She was the first large ocean liner to be built of steel instead of iron, and the first Cunard ship to have an electric lighting installation. For these and other reasons, maritime historians often consider Servia to be the first "modern" ocean liner.
80020

Servia underway


1892 – Launch of HMS Ramillies, a Royal Sovereign-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy,
HMS Ramillies
was a Royal Sovereign-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the Royal Navy, named after the Battle of Ramillies. The ship was built by J. & G. Thompson at Clydebank, starting with her keel laying in August 1890. She was launched in March 1892 and commissioned into the Mediterranean Fleet as flagship the following October. She was armed with a main battery of four 13.5-inch guns and a secondary battery of ten 6-inch guns. The ship had a top speed of 16.5 knots.
80023



1913 – Launch of SMS König, the first of four König-class dreadnought battleships of the Imperial German Navy
SMS König
was the first of four König-class dreadnought battleships of the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. König (Eng: "King") was named in honor of King William II of Württemberg. Laid down in October 1911, the ship was launched on 1 March 1913. Final construction on König was completed shortly after the outbreak of World War I; she was commissioned into the High Seas Fleet on 9 August 1914.
80025



1942 - Second Battle of the Java Sea
The Second Battle of the Java Sea was the last naval action of the Netherlands East Indies campaign, of 1941–42. It occurred on 1 March 1942, two days after the first Battle of the Java Sea. It saw the end of the last Allied warships operating in the waters around Java, allowing Japanese forces to complete their conquest of the Netherlands East Indies unhindered.
80027

The Royal Navy heavy cruiser HMS Exeter sinking after the Battle of the Java Sea, 1 March 1942.
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

2nd of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1740 - Birth of Nicholas Pocock, british naval painter
Nicholas Pocock
(2 March 1740 – 9 March 1821) was a British artist known for his many detailed paintings of naval battles during the age of sail.
80124

bhc1096.jpg



1760 - HMS Tartar's Prize (28), Cptn. Thomas Baillie, wrecked in the Mediterranean.
HMS Tartar's Prize
was a 24-gun sixth-rate of the Royal Navy, which saw active service between 1756 and 1760, during the Seven Years' War.
Originally the French privateer La Marie Victoire, she was captured by HMS Tartar in 1757 and refitted as a privateer hunter. In this role she secured a single victory at sea with the capture of the French vessel La Marquise de Chateaunois. A flimsily built vessel, Tartar's Prize sprang a leak and foundered off the coast of Sardinia in 1760.
1024px-HMS_Tartar_(1756).jpg



1800 - HMS Nereide (38), Cptn. Frederick Watkins, captured privateer Vengeance (16)
Néréide was a Sybille class 32-gun, copper-hulled, frigate of the French Navy. On 22 December 1797 Phoebe captured her and she was taken into British service as HMS Nereide. The French recaptured her at the Battle of Grand Port, only to lose her again when the British took Isle de France (now Mauritius), in 1810. After the Battle of Grand Port she was in such a poor condition that she was laid up and sold for breaking up in 1816.
80133



1801 - HMS Cobourg / His Majesty's hired armed vessel Marechal de Cobourg (16), Lt. Wright, captured French privateer lugger Bienvenue (14) and retook two of her prizes.
His Majesty's hired armed vessel Marechal de Cobourg served the British Royal Navy under contract during the French Revolutionary Wars. Contemporary records also referred to her as Marshall de Cobourg, Marshall Cobourg, Marshall Cobourg, Marquis Cobourg, Marquis de Cobourg, Cobourg, Coborg, and Saxe Cobourg. Further adding to the difficulty in tracking her through the records, is that although she was originally a cutter, later the Navy converted her to a brig.
Her contract ran from 16 October 1794 to 2 November 1801. As a cutter she had a burthen of 20268⁄94 tons (bm), and carried twelve 4-pounder guns. As a brig she had a burthen of 210 tons, was armed with 16 guns, and had a crew of 60 men.
monographie-du-coureur-lougre-1776.jpg



1805 – Launch of HMS Otter, a Royal Navy 16-gun Merlin-class ship sloop
HMS Otter
was a Royal Navy 16-gun Merlin-class ship sloop, launched in 1805 at Hull. She participated in two notable actions in the Indian Ocean and was sold in 1828.
When built, Otter mounted sixteen 32-pounder carronades and two 6-pounder long guns. Under the rating system of the time, she was officially rated at "16 guns". From 1815 she was re-rated to "18 guns", but continued to carry the same armament.
80144



1808 - HMS Sappho (18), George Langford, captures Danish privateer brig Admiral Yawl (28)
The Action of 2 March 1808 was a minor naval battle between the Royal Navy's 18-gun Cruizer-class brig-sloop HMS Sappho, and the 28-gun, Danish two-decker brig Admiral Yawl, during the Gunboat War. Sappho, under the command of Captain George Langford, discovered and chased Admiral Yawl, which was steering a course in order to cut off several merchant vessels to leeward. After a short engagement Sappho captured the Admiral Yawl, commanded by Jørgen Jørgensen.
Admiral Yawl appears in references under a variety of names including Admiral Yorol and Admiral Juul.
80213

HMS Sappho capturing the Danish brig Admiral Jawl, Oil on Canvas, 19th century.


1808 - HMS Cerberus (32), Cptn. W. Selby, HMS Circe (32), Cptn. Hugh Pigot, and HMS Camilla (20), Cptn. John Bowen, capture the Island of Marie Galante.
In early 1808 Captain Selby on HMS Cerberus was the commander of the blockading squadron covering Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. He realized that the French privateers were using the batteries on Marie-Galante to shelter themselves and their prizes and decided to remedy the situation. He sent Pigot with 200 seamen and marines from Cerberus, Circe, and Camilla to capture the island. Pigot landed his force early on 2 March some two miles from Grand Bourg and the garrison duly capitulated. The British also captured a number of cannons and some small arms. In 1825 Ulysses shared in the prize money with the other three vessels.
j6085.jpg



1810 - Boats of HMS Cornwallis (54), Cptn. William Augustus Montagur, carried Margaritta Louisa (8) off the island of Amblaw
On 1 March HMS Cornwallis chased a Dutch man-of-war brig all day until she took refuge in a small bay on the north side of the island of Amblaw. The wind being light and variable, and night approaching, Montagu sent in Cornwallis's boats, under the command of Lieutenant Henry John Peachy. After rowing all night, they captured the Dutch brig Margaritta Louisa, under Captain De Ruyter on 2 March. Margaritta Louisa was pierced for 14 guns but carried only eight, and a crew of 40 men. Margaritta Louisa had left Surabaya nine days earlier with 20 to 30,000 dollars for Ambonya, and supplies for Ternate. In the boarding, the British had one man seriously wounded and four men lightly wounded; the Dutch lost one man killed and 20 wounded.
80233



1811 – Argentine War of Independence:
A royalist fleet defeats a small flotilla of revolutionary ships in the Battle of San Nicolás on the River Plate.

The Battle of San Nicolás was a naval engagement on 2 March 1811 on the Paraná River between the Spanish royalists from Montevideo, and the first flotilla created by the revolutionary government of Buenos Aires. It was the first engagement between the two fleets in the River Plate region since the revolution, and a royalist victory.
80237



1825 – Roberto Cofresí, one of the last successful Caribbean pirates, is defeated in combat and captured by authorities with the Capture of the sloop Anne
The Capture of the sloop Anne was the result of a naval campaign carried out by an alliance between the Spanish Empire forces in Puerto Rico, the Danish government in Saint Thomas and the United States Navy. The powers pursued Roberto Cofresí's pirateflotilla in March 1825 because of the economic losses suffered by the parties to the pirates, as well as diplomatic concerns caused by their use of the flags of Spain and Gran Colombia which menaced the fragile peace between the naval powers. Several of those involved had been attacked by the freebooters. Among the diplomatic concerns caused by Cofresí was a robbery carried out by several of his subordinates, the catalyst of an incident that threatened war between Spain and the United States known as "The Foxardo Affair", eventually leading to the resignation of his rival, pirate hunter David Porter.
80248



1878 – Launch of His Highness' Ship Glasgow, a royal yacht belonging to the Sultan of Zanzibar.
His Highness' Ship Glasgow
was a royal yacht belonging to the Sultan of Zanzibar. She was built in the style of the British frigateHMS Glasgow which had visited the Sultan in 1873. Glasgow cost the Sultan £32,735 and contained several luxury features but failed to impress the Sultan and she lay at anchor in harbour at Zanzibar Town for much of her career. The vessel was brought out of semi-retirement on 25 August 1896 when she participated in the Anglo-Zanzibar War and was soon sunk by a flotilla of British warships. Glasgow's wreck remained in the harbour, her three masts and funnel projecting from the water, until 1912 when she was broken up for scrap.
80260



1900 – Launch of Askold (Russian: Аскольд), a protected cruiser built for the Imperial Russian Navy.
Askold (Russian: Аскольд) was a protected cruiser built for the Imperial Russian Navy. She was named after the legendary Varangian Askold. Her thin, narrow hull and maximum speed of 23.8 knots (44.1 km/h) were considered impressive for the time.
Askold had five thin funnels which gave it a unique silhouette for any vessel in the Imperial Russian Navy. This led British sailors to nickname her Packet of Woodbines after the thin cigarettes popular at the time. However, the five funnels also had a symbolic importance, as it was popularly considered that the number of funnels was indicative of performance, and some navies were known to add extra fake funnels to impress dignitaries in less advanced countries.
80270
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

3rd of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1677 - The action of March 1677 in the West Indies, often called the Battle of Tobago,
between a Dutch fleet under Jacob Binckes and a French force attempting to recapture the island of Tobago.

The action of March 1677 in the West Indies, often called the Battle of Tobago, took place on 3 March 1677 between a Dutch fleet under Jacob Binckes and a French force attempting to recapture the island of Tobago. There was much death and destruction on both sides. One of the Dutch supply ships caught fire and exploded; the fire then quickly spread in the narrow bay causing several ships, among them the French flagship Glorieux, to catch fire and explode in turn which resulted in great loss of life. The French under Vice-Admiral Comte d'Estrées retreated but would make a second attempt at the end of the year with a much stronger fleet.
80349




1698 – Launch of HMS Dartmouth, a 50-gun fourth-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Dartmouth
was a 50-gun fourth-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 3 March 1698 at Southampton.
She was rebuilt according to the 1706 Establishment at Woolwich Dockyard, relaunched on 7 August 1716[2] and formed part of the naval task force sent to Scotland to help subdue the Jacobite rising of 1719. On 8 October 1736, Dartmouth was ordered to be taken to pieces at Woolwich and rebuilt according to the 1733 proposals of the 1719 Establishment. She was relaunched on 22 April 1741.
80355



1756 – Launch of HMS Namur, a 90-gun second rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Namur
was a 90-gun second rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Chatham Dockyard to the draught specified by the 1745 Establishment as amended in 1750, and launched on 3 March 1756. HMS Namur’s battle honours surpass even those of the more famous HMS Victory.

HMS Namur figurehead, Naval Museum of Halifax, CFB Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

80368



1764 - Launch of HMS Triumph, a 74-gun third rate Valiant-class ship of the line
HMS Triumph
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 3 March 1764 at Woolwich.
80406



1776 - American Revolutionary War: The first amphibious landing of the United States Marine Corps begins the Battle of Nassau
Under the command of Commodore Esek Hopkins and Marine Capt. Samuel Nicholas, the Continental Navy makes the first American amphibious landing operation at New Providence, Bahamas, and captures the forts for much needed ordnance and gunpowder.

The Raid of Nassau (March 1–10, 1776) was a naval operation and amphibious asssault by Colonial forces against the British port of Nassau, Bahamas, during the American Revolutionary War (also known as the American War of Independence). The battle is considered one of the first engagements of the newly established Continental Navy and the Continental Marines, the respective progenitors of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The action was also the marines' first amphibious landing. It is sometimes known as the "Battle of Nassau".
80411



1791 – Launch of french Aréthuse, a 40-gun frigate of the French Navy, at Brest
Aréthuse was a 40-gun frigate of the French Navy, built from 1789 following plans by Ozanne.
80417



1794 – Launch of HMS Diana, a 38-gun Artois-class fifth rate frigate of the Royal Navy.
HMS Diana
was a 38-gun Artois-class fifth rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1794.
80458


80450



1799 - HMS Leander, a Portland-class 50-gun fourth rate of the Royal Navy, captured
HMS Leander
was a Portland-class 50-gun fourth rate of the Royal Navy, launched at Chatham on 1 July 1780. She served on the West Coast of Africa, West Indies, and the Halifax station. During the French Revolutionary Wars she participated in the Battle of the Nile before a French ship captured her. The Russians and Turks recaptured her and returned her to the Royal Navy in 1799. On 23 February 1805, while on the Halifax station, Leander captured the French frigate Ville de Milan and recaptured her prize, HMS Cleopatra. On 25 April 1805 cannon fire from Leander killed an American seaman while Leander was trying to search an American vessel off the US coast for contraband. The resulting "Leander Affair" contributed to the worsening of relations between the United States and Great Britain. In 1813 the Admiralty converted Leander to a hospital ship under the name Hygeia. Hygeia was sold in 1817.
80467



1801 - The Battle of the West Kay.
The Danish 18-gun brig HDMS Lougen under Lt Cmdr Carl W. Jessen, engages 18-gun British privateer Experiment and 22-gun HMS Arab off the West Kay at the Danish West Indies. The British are forced to flee.

The first Lougen was a brig of 18 guns, launched in 1791. She was active protecting Danish merchant shipping and suppressing pirates in the Mediterranean and in the Caribbean. In March 1801, she fought off the British privateer Experiment and the 22-gun warship HMS Arab in a single action. When the British captured the Danish West Indies in 1801, Lougen was part of the booty. The British later returned her to Denmark where she was broken up in 1802.
80469



1896 – Launch of HMS Doris, an Eclipse-class protected cruiser built for the Royal Navy
HMS Doris
was an Eclipse-class protected cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the mid-1890s
80514



1904 – Launch of HMS Argyll, one of six Devonshire-class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy
HMS Argyll
was one of six Devonshire-class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron of the Channel Fleet upon completion and was transferred to the 5th Cruiser Squadron of the Atlantic Fleet in 1909. Two years later, she was detached to escort the royal yacht during King George V's trip to British India. Argyll was assigned to the 3rd Cruiser Squadron of the reserve Second Fleet in 1913.
80519



80520

Model of Argyll at the Glasgow Museum of Transport


1907 - Dakota, a steamship built by the Eastern Shipbuilding Company, wrecked
SS
Dakota was a steamship built by the Eastern Shipbuilding Company of Groton, Connecticut for the Great Northern Steamship Company owned by railroad magnate James J. Hill to enhance and promote trade between the United States and Japan.
80528



1921 - SS Hong Moh struck the White Rocks on Lamock Island near Swatow (Shantou) on the southern coast of China.
She broke in two and sank killing about 1,000 of the 1,100 people aboard.
SS Hong Moh
was a passenger ship that was wrecked on the White Rocks off Lamock Island, Swatow, on 3 March 1921
City of Calcutta
The ship was built by Charles Connell & Company of Scotstoun, and was launched on 8 September 1881 as SS City of Calcutta for George Smith & Sons' City Line. The 3,954 GRT ship was 400 feet (120 m) long, 42 feet 1 inch (12.83 m) in the beam, with a draught of 30 feet 1 inch (9.17 m), and was powered by a triple expansion steam engine.
80541



1943 - german Doggerbank – On a return trip from Japan to France the auxiliary minelayer was accidentally sunk by U-43 on 3 March 1943.
All but one of the 365 men aboard, 108 crew plus 257 prisoners-of-war, were killed in the sinking and delayed rescue.

The German ship Doggerbank (Schiff 53) was an auxiliary minelayer and blockade runner of Nazi Germany in World War II.
Laid down as the UK merchant vessel Speybank in 1926, the vessel was captured in 1941 by the German auxiliary cruiser Atlantis, converted to an auxiliary minelayer for the Kriegsmarine and renamed Doggerbank. After laying mines off the coast of South Africa, it travelled to Japan. On the return trip, it was accidentally sunk by the German submarine U-43, with all but one of the 365 men on board (108 crew plus 257 passengers) lost at sea.
80542
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

4th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1653 - Battle of Leghorn.
Dutch fleet of 16 ships, under Commodore Johan van Galen (Mortally wounded), defeated English squadron of 6 ships, under Cptn. Henry Appleton, attempting to break out of blockade at Leghorn and join Cptn. Richard Badiley's 8 ships. 3 ships were captured and 2 destroyed.

The naval Battle of Leghorn took place on 4 March 1653 (14 March Gregorian calendar), during the First Anglo-Dutch War, near Leghorn (Livorno), Italy. It was a victory of a Dutch squadron under Commodore Johan van Galen over an English squadron under Captain Henry Appleton. Afterwards, another English squadron under Captain Richard Badiley, which Appleton had been trying to join up with, reached the scene in time to observe the capture of the last ships of Appleton's squadron, but was outnumbered and forced to return to Porto Longone.
80574



1679 – Launch of HMS Windsor Castle, a 90-gun second rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy, built by Thomas Shish at Woolwich Dockyard
HMS Windsor Castle
was a 90-gun second rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy, built by Thomas Shish at Woolwich Dockyard, and launched in 1679.
Windsor Castle commissioned in 1690 under Captain George Churchill and took part in the Battle of Beachy Head on 30 June 1690. In 1692 she was under the command of Captain Peregrine Osborne, and took part in the Battle of Barfleur on 19–24 May 1692. In 1693 she was commanded by Captain John Munden, but was wrecked on the Goodwin Sands in April 1693.
80577



1760 – Launch of HMS Dragon, a 74-gun Bellona-class third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Dragon
was a 74-gun Bellona-class third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 4 March 1760 at Deptford Dockyard.
80583

The bombardment of Morro Castle on Havana - Left to right: HMS Marlborough, HMS Dragon, HMS Cambridge.


1779 - Launch of HMS Serapis, a Royal Navy two-decked, Roebuck-class fifth rate
HMS Serapis
was a Royal Navy two-decked, Roebuck-class fifth rate. Randall & Brent built her at Greenland South Dockyard, Rotherhithe and launched her in 1779. She was armed with 44 guns (twenty 18-pounders, twenty 9-pounders, and four 6-pounders). Serapis was named after the god Serapis in Greek and Egyptian mythology. The Americans captured her during the American Revolutionary War. They transferred her to the French, who commissioned her as a privateer. She was lost off Madagascar in 1781 to a fire.
80592



1795 - 16-gun French privateer corvette Robert, launched in 1793 at Nantes, captured
Robert was a 16-gun French privateer corvette launched in 1793 at Nantes. The British captured her in 1793 and named her HMS Espion. The French recaptured her in 1794 and took her into service as Espion. The British recaptured her in 1795, but there being another Espion in service by then, the British renamed their capture HMS Spy. She served under that name until the Navy sold her in 1801. She then became a slave ship, whaling ship, and privateer again. The French captured her in mid-1805 and sent her into Guadeloupe.
80596



1807 - HMS Blanche (38), Cptn. Thomas Lavie, wrecked off Ushant.
HMS Amfitrite
was a 38-gun fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She had previously served with the Spanish Navy before she was captured during the Napoleonic Wars and commissioned into the Royal Navy. The Admiralty renamed her HMS Blanche after she had spent just over a year as Amfitrite. She was the only ship in the Navy to bear this specific name, though a number of other ships used the conventional English spelling and were named HMS Amphitrite. Her most notable feat was her capture of Guerrierein 1806. Blanche was wrecked in 1807.
80609

'The Blanche frigate, lost among the Breakers'


1809 – Launch of HMS Royal Oak, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy,
HMS Royal Oak
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 4 March 1809 at Dudman's yard at Deptford Wharf. Her first commanding officer was Captain Pulteney Malcolm.
80622



1840 – Launch of the Friedland , an Océan class 118-gun ship of the line of the French Navy
The Friedland was an Océan class 118-gun ship of the line of the French Navy.
80631

Launch of Friedland, by Antoine Chazal.


1908 – Launch of Waldeck-Rousseau, an armored cruiser built for the French Navy in the first decade of the 20th century
Waldeck-Rousseau was an armored cruiser built for the French Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was the second and final member of the Edgar Quinet class, the last class of armored cruiser to be built by the French Navy. She was laid down at the Arsenal de Lorient in June 1906, launched in March 1908, and commissioned in August 1911. Armed with a main battery of fourteen 194-millimeter (7.6 in) guns, she was more powerful than most other armored cruisers, but she had entered service more than two years after the first battlecruiserHMS Invincible—had rendered the armored cruiser obsolescent. Waldeck-Rousseau nevertheless proved to be a workhorse of the French Mediterranean Fleet.
80858



1914 - First Battle of Topolobampo
The First Battle of Topolobampo was a bloodless engagement and one of the few naval battles of the Mexican Revolution. The small action occurred off Topolobampo, Mexico and involved three gunboats, two from the Mexican Navy and another which mutinied from the armada and joined the rebel Constitutionalists. It was fought on the morning of March 4, 1914 and was the first battle of the naval campaign in the Gulf of California.
80863



1916 – Launch of HMS Renown, the lead ship of her class of battlecruisers of the Royal Navy built during the First World War.
HMS Renown
was the lead ship of her class of battlecruisers of the Royal Navy built during the First World War. She was originally laid down as an improved version of the Revenge-class battleships. Her construction was suspended on the outbreak of war on the grounds she would not be ready in a timely manner. Admiral Lord Fisher, upon becoming First Sea Lord, gained approval to restart her construction as a battlecruiser that could be built and enter service quickly. The Director of Naval Construction (DNC), Eustace Tennyson-D'Eyncourt, quickly produced an entirely new design to meet Admiral Lord Fisher's requirements and the builders agreed to deliver the ships in 15 months. They did not quite meet that ambitious goal, but the ship was delivered a few months after the Battle of Jutland in 1916. Renown, and her sister HMS Repulse, were the world's fastest capital ships upon completion.
80866



1918 - USS Cyclops – On 4 March 1918 the Proteus-class collier left Barbados carrying manganese ore from Brazil. She was due in Baltimore on 13 March but never arrived.
She and 306 people aboard were declared missing, and no wreckage or bodies were ever identified. This is the US Navy's single largest loss of life not directly involving combat.
Her loss was never explained, but one sister ship USS Jason later developed structural faults and two others, Nereus and Proteus, vanished at sea in World War II. Also, Cyclops' starboard engine was out of action, she may have been overloaded, and on 10 March there was a storm off the Virginia Capes.

The USS Cyclops (AC-4) was the second of four Proteus-class colliers built for the United States Navy several years before World War I. Named for the Cyclops, a primordial race of giants from Greek mythology, she was the second U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name. The loss of the ship and 306 crew and passengers without a trace within the area known as the Bermuda Triangle some time after 4 March 1918 remains the single largest loss of life in U.S. Naval history not directly involving combat. As it was wartime, she was thought to have been captured or sunk by a German raider or submarine, because she was carrying 10,800 long tons (11,000 t) of manganese ore used to produce munitions, but German authorities at the time, and subsequently, denied any knowledge of the vessel. The Naval History & Heritage Command has stated she "probably sank in an unexpected storm", but the ultimate cause of the ship's loss is not known.
80870



1970 – French submarine Eurydice explodes underwater, resulting in the loss of the entire 57-man crew.
Eurydice (S644) was a French submarine, one of nine of the Daphné class.
On 4 March 1970, while diving in calm seas off Cape Camarat in the Mediterranean, 35 miles (56 km) east of Toulon, a geophysical laboratory picked up the shock waves of an underwater explosion. French and Italian search teams found an oil slick and a few bits of debris, including a part that bore the name Eurydice.
The cause of the explosion was never determined. All 57 crew were lost.
80875

Flore, sister-ship of Eurydice
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

5th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1691 – Launch of French Foudroyant, a First Rank ship of the line of the French Royal Navy, the lead vessel in the two-ship Foudroyant Class (her sister being the Merveilleux).


1800 – 36-gun frigate HMS Phoebe captures the 22-gun privateer Heureux

Heureux was a 22-gun French privateer brig that the British captured in 1800. She served with the Royal Navy as the 22-gun post ship HMS Heureux. She captured numerous French and Spanish privateers and merchant vessels in the Caribbean before she was lost at sea in 1806. Her fate remains a mystery to this day.
l3252_002.jpg

A full hull and rigged model of the Phoebe(1795), a 36-gun frigate.


1844 – Launch of French Descartes, a wooden-hulled paddle frigate of the French Navy.
Descartes was a wooden-hulled paddle frigate of the French Navy. Laid down as Gomer, she was renamed Descartes in 1841 while still on the stocks.
80918

Steam frigate Descartes off Sevastopol.


1874 – Launch of second USS Intrepid, a steam-powered torpedo ram commissioned and built in 1874 that had the distinction of being the world's first U.S. Navy ship armed with self-propelled torpedoes.
The second USS Intrepid, was a steam-powered torpedo ram commissioned and built in 1874 that had the distinction of being the world's first U.S. Navy ship armed with self-propelled torpedoes. In concept and design she was roughly comparable to the Royal Navy's HMS Polyphemus, although Intrepid was completed more than half a decade earlier. The Intrepid was commissioned by President Ulysses S. Grant's Secretary of Navy George M. Robeson.
80919



1901 – Launch of HMS Drake, the lead ship of her class of armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy around 1900
HMS Drake
was the lead ship of her class of armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy around 1900. She was assigned to several different cruiser squadrons in home waters upon completion, sometimes as flagship, until 1911 when she became the flagship of the Australia Station. Upon her return home, she was assigned to the 6th Cruiser Squadron of the 2nd Fleet and became the squadron's flagship when the fleet was incorporated into the Grand Fleet upon the outbreak of the First World War.
80923



1901 – Launch of HMS Montagu and HMS Albemarle, both Duncan-class pre-dreadnought battleships of the British Royal Navy.
HMS Montagu
was a Duncan-class pre-dreadnought battleship of the British Royal Navy. Built to counter a group of fast Russian battleships, Montagu and her sister ships were capable of steaming at 19 knots (35 km/h; 22 mph), making them the fastest battleships in the world. The Duncan-class battleships were armed with a main battery of four 12-inch (305 mm) guns and they were broadly similar to the London-class battleships, though of a slightly reduced displacement and thinner armour layout. As such, they reflected a development of the lighter second-class ships of the Canopus-class battleship. Montagu was built between her keel laying in November 1899 and her completion in July 1903. The ship had a brief career, serving for two years in the Mediterranean Fleet before transferring to the Channel Fleet in early 1905. During wireless telegraphy experiments in May 1906, she ran aground off Lundy Island. Repeated attempts to refloat the ship failed, and she proved to be a total loss. She was ultimately broken up in situ.
80927

HMS Albemarle


1916 - Ocean liner Príncipe de Asturias ran aground and sank near the island of Sao Sebastiao, Brazil. At least 445 out of 588 aboard were lost.
Príncipe de Asturias was a Spanish ocean liner, owned by the Naviera Pinillos and built at the Russell & Co. (later Lithgows) shipyard in Port Glasgow, in Scotland; being launched in 1914. She was named after the Prince of Asturias, the historical title given to the heir to the Spanish Crown.
80940



1923 – Launch of Yūbari (夕張) was an experimental light cruiser built between 1922 and 1923 for the Imperial Japanese Navy
Yūbari (夕張) was an experimental light cruiser built between 1922 and 1923 for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). Although a test bed for various new designs and technologies, she was commissioned as a front-line warship and participated in numerous combat operations during World War II before she was sunk by the U.S. Navy. Designs pioneered on Yūbari had a major impact on future Japanese warship designs.
80942



1927 – Launch of Juan Sebastián de Elcano, a training ship for the Royal Spanish Navy. It is a four-masted topsail, steel-hulled barquentine (schooner barque).
Juan Sebastián de Elcano is a training ship for the Royal Spanish Navy. It is a four-masted topsail, steel-hulled barquentine(schooner barque). At 113 metres (371 ft) long, it is the third-largest tall ship in the world, and is the sailing vessel that has sailed the furthest, covering more than 2,000,000 nautical miles (3,700,000 km; 2,300,000 mi) in its history.
It is named after Spanish explorer Juan Sebastián Elcano, captain of Ferdinand Magellan's last exploratory fleet and the man who completed the first circumnavigation of the world. The ship also carries the Elcano coat of arms, which was granted to the family by Emperor Charles I following Elcano's return in 1522 from Magellan's global expedition. The coat of arms is a terraqueous globe with the motto "Primus Circumdedisti Me" (meaning: "First to circumnavigate me").
80945
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

6th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1780 – Launch of French Vénus, a 32-gun frigate of the French Navy.
The Vénus was a 32-gun frigate of the French Navy.
She was launched in Saint-Malo in 1780. Her main duties were escorting convoys between Île de Ré, Nantes and Brest. In this capacity, she captured a British privateer on 16 June.
She was wrecked on 5 August 1781 near Glénan Islands, off Concarneau, when she ran aground due to a navigation error of the pilot. The crew was saved, but in spite of efforts to refloat her, she became a total loss.
81000



1782 – Launch of French Suffisant, a 74-gun Pégase-class ship of the line of the French Navy
The Suffisant was a 74-gun Pégase-class ship of the line of the French Navy, launched in 1782. She served during the last months of the American War of Independence, and survived to see action in the French Revolutionary Wars.
81007



1787 – Launch of HMS Vanguard, a 74-gun Arrogant-class third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Vanguard
was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 6 March 1787 at Deptford. She was the sixth vessel to bear the name.
In December 1797, Captain Edward Berry was appointed flag captain, flying Rear Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson's flag.
81014

Victory, Captain, Agamemnon, Vanguard & Elephant (Print) (PAD5986)


1808, March 6–8 – HMS San Fiorenzo captures French frigate Piémontaise
The Piémontaise was a 40-gun Consolante-class frigate of the French Navy. She served as a commerce raider in the Indian Ocean until her capture in March 1808. She then served with the British Royal Navy in the East Indies until she was broken up in Britain in 1813.
81041

HMS St Fiorenzo capturing Piémontaise on 9 March 1808

81045

San Fiorenzo (far left) and Nymphe (second from right) capture Résistance and Constance, 9 March 1797. Oil painting by Nicholas Pocock.


1809 – Launch of HMS Malacca, an Apollo-class frigate of the Royal Navy that the Admiralty ordered from the British East India Company to be built at Prince of Wales Island (Penang), under the name Penang.
HMS Malacca
was an Apollo-class frigate of the Royal Navy that the Admiralty ordered from the British East India Company to be built at Prince of Wales Island (Penang), under the name Penang. Prior to her launch in 1809 the Admiralty changed her name to Malacca, but she sailed to England in 1810 as Penang. The Navy commissioned her as Malacca in 1810 and sent her out to the East Indies. She had a brief career there, participating in one small punitive expedition, before she was paid-off in 1815 and broken up in 1816.
81051


81052



1836, March 6 – Texas schooner Liberty captures the Mexican schooner Pelicano
The Texas schooner Liberty was one of the four schooners of the First Texas Navy (1836–1838). She served in the Texas Navy for only about 6 months, capturing the Mexican brig Pelicano loaded with weapons for their army in Texas. Later that year, she sailed to New Orleans accompanying the wounded Sam Houston, where she was repaired. Texas was unable to pay for the repairs and the ship was sold in June, 1836, to pay for the cost of the repairs. This left the Texas Navy with only three ships.
81063



1874 – Launch of The corbeta (corvette) ARA Uruguay, built in England, is the largest ship afloat of its age in the Armada de la República Argentina (Argentine Navy)
The corbeta (corvette) ARA Uruguay, built in England, is the largest ship afloat of its age in the Armada de la República Argentina (Argentine Navy), with more than 140 years passed since its commissioning in September 1874. The last of the legendary squadron of President Sarmiento, the Uruguay took part in revolutions, ransoms, expeditions, rescues, and was even floating headquarters of the Navy School. During its operational history 1874–1926 the Uruguay has served as a gunboat, school ship, expedition support ship, Antarctic rescue ship, fisheries base supply ship, and hydrographic survey vessel, and is now a museum ship in Buenos Aires. This ship may be the oldest in South America having been built in 1874 at Laird Bros. (now Cammell Laird) shipyard of Birkenhead, England, at a cost of £32,000. This ship is rigged to a barque sailplan (three masts, two of which have cross spars). The ship's steel hull is lined in teak.
The ship's namesake is an earlier Argentine Navy schooner, a seven-gun combatant in the Battle of Juncal, 1827.
81069



1938 - spanish Canarias-class heavy cruiser Baleares sunk by the Lepanto - 765 seamen died.
Baleares was a Canarias-class heavy cruiser of the Spanish Navy. The two ships of the class were built upon a British design and were a modified version of the Royal Navy′s County class. Baleares was constructed in Spain by the Vickers-Armstrongs subsidiary Sociedad Española de Construcción Naval, and saw service during the Spanish Civil War, when she was torpedoed and sunk by destroyers of the Spanish Republican Navy during the Battle of Cape Palos.
81072



1940 – Launch of French Jean Bart, a French battleship of World War II, named for the 17th-century seaman, privateer, and corsair Jean Bart.
Jean Bart was a French battleship of World War II, named for the 17th-century seaman, privateer, and corsair Jean Bart. She was the second Richelieu-class battleship. Derived from the Dunkerque class, Jean Bart (and her sister ship Richelieu) were designed to fight the new battleships of the Italian Navy. Their speed, shielding, armament, and overall technology were state of the art, but they had a rather unusual main battery armament arrangement, with two 4-gun turrets forward and none aft.
Jean Bart was incomplete when France surrendered to Germany in June 1940. She sailed from Saint-Nazaire to Casablanca just before the Armistice. She was sunk in harbour in 1942. After the war she was re-floated, completed with an updated anti-aircraft battery, and entered service in 1955. She had a very short career: Jean Bart was put into reserve in 1957, decommissioned in 1961, and scrapped in 1969.
81076

Jean Bart in the harbor of Casablanca, photographed by a plane from USS Ranger. Turret number two was not yet operational.


1943 - Battle of Blackett Strait - an American task force intercepts 2 Japanese destroyers and sinks them both.
The Battle of Blackett Strait (Japanese: ビラ・スタンモーア夜戦 Battle of Vila-Stanmore) was a naval battle of the Pacific campaign of World War II, fought on 6 March 1943 in the Blackett Strait, between Kolombangara islands and Arundel Island in the Solomon Islands.
81078



1987 – The British ferry MS Herald of Free Enterprise capsizes in about 90 seconds, killing 193.
MS Herald of Free Enterprise
was a roll-on/roll-off (RORO) ferry which capsized moments after leaving the Belgian port of Zeebrugge on the night of 6 March 1987, killing 193 passengers and crew.
81081


 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

7th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1665 - HMS London (76) blew up in an accident and sank in the Thames estuary.
London was a 76-gun second-rate ship of the line in the Navy of the Commonwealth of England, originally built at Chatham Dockyard by shipwright John Taylor, and launched in June 1656. She gained fame as one of the ships that escorted Charles IIfrom Holland back to England during the English Restoration, carrying Charles' younger brother James Duke of York, and commanded by Captain John Lawson.
London was accidentally blown up in 1665 and sank in the Thames Estuary.[2] According to Samuel Pepys 300 of her crew were killed, 24 were blown clear and survived, including one woman. Lawson was not aboard at the time of the explosion but many of his relatives were killed.
81188

The wreck of London

81191



1757 – Launch of HMS Princess Amelia, an 80-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Princess Amelia
was an 80-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Woolwich Dockyard to the draught specified by the 1745 Establishment, and launched on 7 March 1757.
She participated in the 1781 Battle of Dogger Bank under the command of Captain Macartney with reduced masts and guns.
Princess Amelia was lent to the Board of Customs in November 1788, and thereby deleted from the Navy List. She arrived at Sheerness on 24 March 1818 from Stangate Creek. The Admiralty then sold her on 11 June 1818 to a Mr. Snooks for £2,610.
81196



1765 – Launch of The San Zaccharia, a 64-gun ship of the line of the Navy of the Order of Saint John of Malta, later brought into French service as the Dégo.
The San Zaccharia was a 64-gun ship of the line of the Navy of the Order of Saint John of Malta, later brought into French service as the Dégo.
81199

A model of an 18th-century third-rate of the Order of Saint John, similar to the San Zaccharia


1765 Launch of Artésien (“Artesian”), a 64-gun ship of the line
Artésien (“Artesian”) was a 64-gun ship of the line of the French Navy, lead ship of her class. She was funded by a don des vaisseaux donation from the Estates of Artois.
Artésien was built in 1765 as a part of a series of twelve ships of the line began by Choiseul to compensate for the losses endured by the French Royal Navy during the Seven Years' War. She was paid by the province of Artois and Flander, and named in its honour, according to the practice of the time.
Artésien took part in the American revolutionary war under Suffren, departing in 1781. Off Cape Verde, Artésien detected an English squadron, resulting in the Battle of Porto Praya.
Artésien was decommissioned in 1785 and used as a shear hulk.
A fine 1/28th scale model was used to instruct Louis XVI in naval studies. The model is now on display at the Musée de la Marine.
81316



1778 - Continental frigate USS Randolph (32) explodes while attacking HMS Yarmouth (64) off the coast of Barbados, killing all but four of her 315 crew.
On the afternoon of 7 March, Randolph's lookouts spotted sail on the horizon. At 21:00 that evening, that ship, now flying British colors, came up on the Randolph as the largest ship in the convoy, and demanded they hoist their colors. The Randolph then hoisted American colors and fired a broadside into the British ship, mistakenly believing the ship to be a large sloop. The stranger turned out to be the British 64-gun ship of the line, HMS Yarmouth.
As a 64-gun, two-deck line-of-battle ship, Yarmouth had double the number of guns as Randolph. Yarmouth's guns were also significantly heavier, mounting 32 pound cannons on her main deck, 18 pounder guns on her upper deck and 9 pounder guns on her quarterdeck and forecastle, giving her almost five times the weight of shot that Randolph could fire. The Randolph and General Moultrie engaged Yarmouth until the Randolph's magazine exploded with a blinding flash. The Yarmouth was struck with burning debris up to six feet long, which significantly damaged her sails and rigging as well as killing five, and wounding twelve.
The damage caused to Yarmouth's sails and rigging prevented her from pursuing the remaining South Carolina ships which slipped away in the darkness.
The loss of the Randolph resulted in the deaths of 311 of her crew, including Capt. Nicholas Biddle, with 4 survivors.

The first USS Randolph was a 32-gun frigate in the Continental Navy named for Peyton Randolph.
81253



HMS Yarmouth was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Deptford Dockyard. She was previously ordered to the dimensions specified in the 1741 proposals for modifications to the 1719 Establishment, but the Admiralty had very quickly concluded that these were too small, and as an experiment in 1742 authorised an addition of 6ft to the planned length, and the Yarmouth was re-ordered to the enlarged design in June 1742. She was built at Deptford, where the Admiralty felt they could best observe the effectiveness of the added size, and launched on 8 March 1745.
81256


1583580152990.png



1780 – Launch of HMS Inflexible, a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy,
HMS Inflexible
was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 7 March 1780 at Harwich.
81263


81264



1810 - Death of Cuthbert Collingwood
Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood (26 September 1748 – 7 March 1810) was an admiral of the Royal Navy, notable as a partner with Lord Nelson in several of the British victories of the Napoleonic Wars, and frequently as Nelson's successor in commands
81274


1860 – Launch of HMS Howe, a 121-gun screw first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy.
HMS Howe
was built as a 121-gun screw first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She and her sister HMS Victoria were the first and only British three-decker ships of the line to be designed from the start for screw propulsion, but the Howe was never completed for sea service (and never served under her original name). During the 1860s, the first ironclad battleships gradually made unarmoured two- and three-deckers obsolete.
81284

The former HMS Howe as the school ship HMS Impregnable in the 1890s.

81291

Scale: 1:48. A contemporary full hull model of the 120-gun three-decked ship HMS ‘Howe’ (1860) mounted on its original wooden baseboard. It is complete with stump masts and bowsprit, two shortened funnels, a full set of guns mounted through their ports and a half bust gold-painted figurehead on the bow. The hull is finished in the traditional black and white striped colour scheme, with a coppered bottom, and a single screw mounted at the stern.


1864 – Launch of HMS Zealous, one of the three ships (the others being HMS Royal Alfred and HMS Repulse) forming the second group of wooden steam battleships selected in 1860 for conversion to ironclads
HMS
Zealous was one of the three ships (the others being HMS Royal Alfred and HMS Repulse) forming the second group of wooden steam battleships selected in 1860 for conversion to ironclads. This was done in response to the perceived threat to Britain offered by the large French ironclad building programme. The ship was ordered to the West Coast of Canada after she was completed to represent British interests in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Zealous became the flagship for the Pacific Station for six years until she was relieved in 1872. She was refitted upon her arrival and subsequently became the guard ship at Southampton until she was paid off in 1875. The ship was in reserve until she was sold for scrap in 1886.
81292

HMS Zealous at Esquimalt with her sails set.


1901 – Launch of Duchesse Anne (formerly called Großherzogin Elisabeth), the last remaining full-rigged ship under French flag.
Duchesse Anne (formerly called Großherzogin Elisabeth) is the last remaining full-rigged ship under French flag. She was built in 1901 with a steel hull by the yard of Joh. C. Tecklenborg of Bremerhaven-Geestemünde (Germany) according to plans drawn by Georg W. Claussen. The mainmast is 48 m tall and 25 sails were rigged. She was used as a training ship for young aspiring sailors in the German merchant marine.
81297

Sailing as Großherzogin Elisabethin 1913


1908 – Launch of SMS Nassau, the first dreadnought battleship built for the Imperial German Navy,
SMS Nassau
was the first dreadnought battleship built for the Imperial German Navy, a response to the launching of the British battleship HMS Dreadnought. Nassau was laid down on 22 July 1907 at the Kaiserliche Werft in Wilhelmshaven, and launched less than a year later on 7 March 1908, approximately 25 months after Dreadnought. She was the lead ship of her classof four battleships, which included Posen, Rheinland, and Westfalen.
81306

Nassau, very early in her career

81305

Nassau and the rest of the I Battle Squadron in Kiel before the war


1941 – Günther Prien and the crew of German submarine U-47, one of the most successful U-boats of World War II, disappear without a trace.
German submarine U-47
was a Type VIIB U-boat of Germany's navy (Kriegsmarine) during World War II. She was laid down on 25 February 1937 at Friedrich Krupp Germaniawerftin Kiel as yard number 582 and went into service on 17 December 1938 under the command of Günther Prien.
During U-47's career, she sank a total of 31 enemy vessels and damaged eight more, including the British battleship HMS Royal Oak on 14 October 1939. U-47 ranks as one of the most successful German U-boats of World War II.
81308

A model of U-47 viewed from the side



1989 – Launch of Kaiwo Maru (海王丸 Kaiō-Maru), a Japanese four-masted training barque tall ship. She was built in 1989 to replace a 1930 ship of the same name
Kaiwo Maru (海王丸 Kaiō-Maru) is a Japanese four-masted training barque tall ship. She was built in 1989 to replace a 1930 ship of the same name. She is 110.09 m (361.2 ft) overall, with a beam of 13.80 m (45.3 ft) and a depth of 10.70 m (35.1 ft). She is assessed as 2,556 GT. Propulsion is by two 4-cylinder diesel engines and a total of 2,760 m2 (29,700 sq ft) of sails. The engines have a total power of 3,000 horsepower (2,200 kW) and can propel the ship at a maximum of 14.1 kn (26.1 km/h; 16.2 mph), with a normal service maximum of 13 kn (24 km/h; 15 mph). Kaiwo Maru has a range of 9,800 nmi (18,100 km; 11,300 mi). The four masts are the fore mast, main mast, mizzen mast and jigger mast. The main mast is 43.50 m (142.7 ft). Her complement is 199
81312
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

8th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1726 – Birth of Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe, English admiral and politician, Treasurer of the Navy (d. 1799)
Admiral of the Fleet Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe, KG (8 March 1726 – 5 August 1799) was a British naval officer. After serving throughout the War of the Austrian Succession, he gained a reputation for his role in amphibious operations against the French coast as part of Britain's policy of naval descents during the Seven Years' War. He also took part, as a naval captain, in the decisive British naval victory at the Battle of Quiberon Bay in November 1759.
81338


1745 – Launch of HMS Yarmouth, a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Deptford Dockyard.
HMS Yarmouth
was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Deptford Dockyard. She was previously ordered to the dimensions specified in the 1741 proposals for modifications to the 1719 Establishment, but the Admiralty had very quickly concluded that these were too small, and as an experiment in 1742 authorised an addition of 6ft to the planned length, and the Yarmouth was re-ordered to the enlarged design in June 1742. She was built at Deptford, where the Admiralty felt they could best observe the effectiveness of the added size, and launched on 8 March 1745.
Commissioned in February 1745 under Captain Roger Martin. In 1747 under Captain Piercy Brett she was one of George Anson's squadron at the First Battle of Cape Finisterre. In 1781, Yarmouth was reduced in armament to become a 60-gun ship. She remained in this role until 1811, when she was broken up
81345


81342

Scale: 1:60. A full hull model of the Yarmouth, a 70-gun, two-decker ship of the line (1745), built plank on frame in the Navy Board style. The model is decked, equipped and rigged. The standing rigging is original.


1757 – Launch of HMS Rose, a 20-gun Seaford-class sixth-rate post ship of the Royal Navy, built in Hull,
HMS Rose
was a 20-gun (Seaford-class) sixth-rate post ship of the Royal Navy, built in Hull, England in 1757. Her activities in suppressing smuggling in the colony of Rhode Island provoked the formation of what became the Continental Navy, precursor of the modern United States Navy. She was based at the North American station in the West Indies and then used in the American Revolutionary War. She was scuttled in the harbor of Savannah, Georgia in 1779. A replica was built in 1970, then modified to match HMS Surprise, and used in two films, Master and Commander: Far Side of the World and Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.
81347


Replica HMS Rose off Massachusetts in 1971, the hull painted as her namesake
81353



1795 - Action of 8 March 1795
The Action of 8 March 1795 was a minor naval engagement in the Mediterranean theatre of the French Revolutionary Wars. The action was part of series of battles fought in the spring of 1795 between British and French fleets for control of the Ligurian Sea and thus the blockade of the French naval base of Toulon. The engagement was the first significant action of the year and was fought principally between the damaged British 74-gun ship of the line HMS Berwick and the French 32-gun frigate Alceste, with the later assistance of the frigate Vestale and the 74-gun Duquesne, distantly supported by the rest of the French Mediterranean Fleet.


1795 - Action of 8 March 1795 - captured HMS Berwick
HMS Berwick
was a 74-gun Elizabeth-class third rate of the Royal Navy, launched at Portsmouth Dockyard on 18 April 1775, to a design by Sir Thomas Slade. She fought the French at the Battle of Ushant (1778) and the Dutch at the Battle of Dogger Bank (1781). The French captured her in the Action of 8 March 1795 during the French Revolutionary Wars and she served with them with some success then and at the start of the Napoleonic Wars until the British recaptured her at the Battle of Trafalgar. Berwicksank shortly thereafter in a storm.
81363

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan with sternboard decoration and name on the counter, sheer lines with inboard detail and figurehead, and longitudinal half-breadth for Berwick (1775), a 74-gun Third Rate, two-decker, as built at Portsmouth Dockyard.

81366

Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the internal and external profile of works illustrating the knees, beams and external planking from the main wales and above for Berwick (1775), a 74-gun Third Rate, two-decker. It is unknown when this plan was drawn.


1796 - HMS Orpheus (32) engaged Banda batteries: Banda Isles taken.
HMS Orpheus
was a 32–gun fifth rate Amazon-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1780, and served for more than a quarter of a century, before she was wrecked in 1807.
81523



1806 - Boats of HMS Egyptienne (40), Cptn. Charles Paget, cut out French privateer frigate Alcide from the harbour of Muros. Alcide was frigate-built and pierced for 34 guns.
Égyptienne was a French frigate launched at Toulon in 1799. Her first service was in Napoleon's Egyptian campaign of 1801, in which the British captured her at Alexandria. She famously carried the Rosetta Stone to Woolwich, and then the Admiralty commissioned her into the Royal Navy as the 40-gun fifth-rate frigate HMS Egyptienne. She served in a number of single-ship actions before being reduced to harbour service in 1807, and was sold for breaking in 1817.
81375

Portrait of Égyptienne by Jean-Jacques Baugean

egypti10.jpg



1808 - HMS San Fiorenzo (38), Cptn. George Nicholas Hardinge (Killed in Action), captured Piemontaise (50), Cptn. Epron, in the Gulf of Mannar
The Piémontaise was a 40-gun Consolante-class frigate of the French Navy. She served as a commerce raider in the Indian Ocean until her capture in March 1808. She then served with the British Royal Navy in the East Indies until she was broken up in Britain in 1813.
81378

HMS St Fiorenzo and Piémontaise.


1841 – Launch of French Andromaque, a Surveillante class sixty-gun frigate of the French Navy
The Surveillante class was a type of sixty-gun frigate of the French Navy, designed in 1823 by Mathurin-François Boucher.
One of the main innovations with respect to previous design was the disappearance of the gangways, which provided a flush deck capable of harbouring a complete second battery. With the standardisation on the 30-pounder calibre for all naval ordnance that occurred in the 1820s, this design allowed for a frigate throwing a 900-pound broadside, thrice the firepower of the 40-gun Pallas class that constituted the majority of the frigate forces during the Empire, and comparable to that of a 74-gun.
By far the best-known ship of the class is Belle Poule, which achieved fame when she transported the ashes of Napoléon back to France in the so-called Retour des cendres; for this occasion, she was painted all black, a colour scheme that she retained later in her career, but which is uncharacteristic of the ships of this type.

Belle Poule model
81503



1861 - The Battle of Hampton Roads - Day 1 - Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and USS Congress
The Battle of Hampton Roads, often referred to as either the Battle of the Monitor and Merrimack (or Virginia) or the Battle of Ironclads, was the most noted and arguably most important naval battle of the American Civil War from the standpoint of the development of navies. It was fought over two days, March 8–9, 1862, in Hampton Roads, a roadstead in Virginia where the Elizabeth and Nansemond rivers meet the James River just before it enters Chesapeake Bay adjacent to the city of Norfolk. The battle was a part of the effort of the Confederacy to break the Union blockade, which had cut off Virginia's largest cities and major industrial centers, Norfolk and Richmond, from international trade.
81509

Chromolithograph depicting the Battle of Hampton Roads.

81521

Congress's magazine explodes
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
16,409
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

9th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events



1746 – Launch of french Conquérant, a Citoyen class 74-gun ships of the line all built at Brest Naval Dockyard
The Conquérant was originally launched in 1746 on a design by François Coulomb the Younger. She was taken out of service in March 1764 & rebuilt at Brest as a Citoyen class 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy.
81553



1765 – Launch of HMS Invincible, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Deptford.
HMS Invincible
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 9 March 1765 at Deptford. Invincible was built during a period of peace to replace ships worn out in the recently concluded Seven Years' War. The ship went on to serve in the American War of Independence, fighting at the battles of Cape St Vincent in 1780, and under the command of Captain Charles Saxton, the Battles of the Chesapeake in 1781 and St Kitts in 1782.
81559



1778 - HMS Ariadne (20), Cptn. Pringle, and HMS Ceres (18), Cptn. Dacres, took American frigate USS Alfred (20) off the Bahamas. Her consort USS Raleigh escaped.
On 9 March 1778, near Barbados, Ariadne and Ceres encountered two vessels belonging to the Continental Navy, Raleigh and Alfred. When the American ships attempted to flee, Alfred fell behind her faster consort. Shortly after noon the British men-of-war caught up with Alfred and forced her to surrender after a half an hour's battle. Her captors described Alfred as being of 300 tons and 180 men, and under the command of Elisha Hinsman
HMS Ceres was an 18-gun sloop launched in 1777 for the British Royal Navy that the French captured in December 1778 off Saint Lucia. The French Navy took her into service as Cérès. The British recaptured her in 1782 and renamed her HMS Raven, only to have the French recapture her again early in 1783. The French returned her name to Cérès, and she then served in the French Navy until sold at Brest in 1791.
81564



1796 Boats of HMS Barfleur (98), HMS Egmont (74), HMS Bombay Castle (74) with two other 74s, brought out the captured British frigate Nemesis (28), French ship-corvette Sardine (18) and brig-corvette Postillon from the neutral port of Tunis.
On 9 March 1796, Nemesis was anchored in the neutral harbour of Tunis, together with Sardine, under the command of Enseigne de vaisseu Icard (acting), and Postillon. The British sent a squadron under the command of Vice-Admiral William Waldegrave to recapture Nemesis. Boats from Egmont, Barfleur and Bombay Castle attacked the French ships and captured all three. The squadron also included Zealous, Tartar, and the cutter Fox. The British took the three men who had defected from Nemesis to Sardine and hanged them.
Admiral Jervis sent Nemesis, Sardine, and Postillon to Ajaccio. (Lloyd's List reported that Barfleur escorted Nemesis and Sardine to San Fiorenzo. He had Postillon repaired and painted before selling her to Sir Gilbert Elliot the British viceroy of the Anglo-Corsican Kingdom, for onward transfer to the Dey of the Regency of Algiers. Nemesis returned to British service, and Sardine was brought into the Royal Navy.
81573

Model of HMS Egmont, 74-gun ship, 3rd rate, launched 1768.


1810 - The Purísima Concepción, a Spanish first-rate ship of the line of the Kingdom of Spain's Armada Real in service since 1779, wrecked 1810
The Purísima Concepción, was a Spanish first-rate ship of the line of the Kingdom of Spain's Armada Real in service between 1779 and 1810.
81600


81603



1810 - Spanish Montañés, a 74 gun third-rate Spanish ship of the line, lost in heavy storm
The Montañés was a 74 gun third-rate Spanish ship of the line. The name ship of her class, she was built in the Ferrol shipyards and paid for by the people of Cantabria. She was built following José Romero y Fernández de Landa's system as part of the San Ildefonso class, though her were amended by Retamosa to refine her buoyancy. She was launched in May 1794 and entered service the following year. With 2400 copper plates on her hull, she was much faster than other ships of the same era, reaching 14 (rather than the average 10) knots downwind and 10 (rather than 8) knots upwind.
In 1795 she fought a French force of 8 ships of the line (including one three-decker) and 2 frigates single-handed in the bay of San Feliu de Guíxols - thanks to her superior speed, the Montañés managed to get within range of a coastal artillery battery, forcing the French to break off the chase.
In June 1805 she was put under the command of Francisco Alcedo and made part of Alcalá Galdiano's division, defending Cadiz from a possible British attack. At the battle of Trafalgarshe was assigned to the second division of Gravina's squadron. Both Alcedo and his deputy Antonio Castaños were killed (with the ship's command passing to lieutenant Joaquín Gutiérrez de Rubalcava), but overall the ship lost only 20 dead and 29 wounded and was able to recapture the Santa Ana and Neptuno after their capture by the British. The Montañés returned to Cadiz on the night of 21 October 1805.
Now commanded by José Quevedo, on 14 July 1808 the Montañés took part in the capture of the Rosily Squadron at Cadiz. She also made several voyages to the Canary Islands, Balearics and Havana before being lost in a heavy storm on 10 March 1810.
81609



1895 - Reina Regente – the cruiser sank in a storm on 9 March 1895, with the loss of all 420 crew.
Reina Regente was a Reina Regente-class protected cruiser of the Spanish Navy. Entering service in 1888, she was lost in 1895 during a storm in the Gulf of Cádiz while she was travelling from Tangier, Morocco to Cádiz, Spain.
81625
 
Top