18 century ship galley cooling system

Messis

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Have noticed in J.M.Ballu book "The construction of Hermione" a reference explaining that the galley panel, (the roof of the galley on the main deck) was a watertight basin, keeping water in it, in order to cool down the stove's copper ducts which passed through.

Still, this statement isn't clear, if it only concerns the building of today's replica or if also the 1780 ship had such a cooling system.

Any knowledge or comments would be much appreciated.

20190601_184734.jpg
 

Uwek

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A very interesting question, and directly I have no answer or knowledge about this detail.
I have the book and the monographie made by Jean Claude Lemineur published from ancre and will check it tomorrow. Hope to find something there.

 

DocBlake

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I’ve never seen that feature in any 17th or 18th century ships plan that I’ve reviewed. I could be wrong.
 

Messis

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And a new picture! An art work made from J.B.Heron for the Association Hermione Lafayette. Its in the book of Emanuel De Fontainieu.... showing actually the ship of 1779 and the basin to be some kind of metal (cast iron?), same as the material of the stove's roof (18) on the gun deck.

There is even an additional detail... very interesting I dare to say.... the duct looks to be reflected in the basin. This way it brings to the viewer the sense of the existence of water in the basin!20190602_073138.jpg
 

Uwek

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And a new picture! An art work made from J.B.Heron for the Association Hermione Lafayette. Its in the book of Emanuel De Fontainieu.... showing actually the ship of 1779 and the basin to be some kind of metal (cast iron?), same as the material of the stove's roof (18) on the gun deck.

There is even an additional detail... very interesting I dare to say.... the duct looks to be reflected in the basin. This way it brings to the viewer the sense of the existence of water in the basin!View attachment 98363
A very interesting painting ...... sorry I had yesterday no chance to check ......

Interesting would be the fact, how they solved the problem of a small "pool" and the water inside during heavy seas
This is a video of a modern cruising ship with all their modern stabilisation equipment etc.


And I guess a relatively small sailing ship like the Hermione was only horizontal when she was in harbour

I remember this photo I made Rochefort, showing the replica during heavy seas

IMG_04581.JPG
 

Uwek

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I know now a little bit more.....seems, that such formed hatches were standard on french ships.
So these hatches could be easily removed, to have free access to the stove

Take a look here (three different posts):



 

Messis

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Dear Uwe, you made my day! Thank you 1000 times . Astonishing what you did!

Lots of material to study! Give me please some time to study carefully and let me then come back.


Christos
 

Uwek

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Dear Uwe, you made my day! Thank you 1000 times . Astonishing what you did!

Lots of material to study! Give me please some time to study carefully and let me then come back.


Christos
You are welcome - with such kind of researches (or think about), I am also learning a lot - and I am happy to share
 

Messis

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@Uwek- Dear Uwe I believe its clear now. Such a cooling system did existed! Its not only stated in the text, there is also an accurate drawing. On which I noted my toughts. I believe the cooling water container -basin-panel-, was made by cast iron, as the stove it self.This gve to it a greater mass (better thermal absorption) than a copper plate and most importantly by casting it was easyer or at least possible -if not the only method- to make a watertight panel, as a welding method wasnt available at that time.

I dont know if you agree with my comments. Anyway am greatefull for your help... much appreciated.

ChristosBBB.jpg
 

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Messis

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The thing with this photo is that, on that small plate at the side, there is a description about the arrangement, which stupidly as I was there missed to read. I have send few weeks ago, an email to mr Ballu asking him to clarify me, if this system concerns only the replica or the 1780 ship as well. An email which regrettably never responded to.
 
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