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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
11 June 1798 - Maltese ship San Giovanni, captured on the stocks in 1798 by the French and launched and commissioned as Athénien.


HMS
Athenienne was a 64-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She was the former Maltese ship San Giovanni, which the French captured on the stocks in 1798 and launched and commissioned as Athénien. The Royal Navy captured her at or prior to the surrender of Valletta, on 4 September 1800, and took her into service as HMS Athenienne. She was wrecked near Sicily, with great loss of life, in 1806.

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French career
The Knights of Malta were constructing San Giovanni for their navy at her building site in Valletta when the French occupied Malta. She was launched four months later, and the French took her into service as Athénien. They appointed her to the medical services of the fleet, and in that capacity carried out research on the diseases affecting the French fleet in the Mediterranean.

The British acquired Athénien in connection with the capture of Malta. Although the capitulation only took place in September, Athenian was among the British vessels at Malta that shared in the prize money for the capture of Courageux on 29 March 1800.

The Royal Navy brought Athénien into British service as HMS Athenienne.

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A model of an 18th century third-rate of the Order of Saint John, similar to the San Giovanni

British career
In December 1800, Sir Thomas Livingstone assumed command of Athenienne. He then accompanied Rear Admiral Sir John Borlase Warren to the coast of Egypt in search of a French squadron under Admiral Ganteaume, which was east of Sardinia. The French squadron escaped.

Athenienne then joined the squadron under Lord Keith off Alexandria until she sprang a leak and returned to Malta for repairs. In 1850 the Admiralty awarded the Naval General Service Medal with clasp "Egypt" to claimants from the crews of the vessels that had served in the navy's Egyptian campaign between 8 March 1801 and 2 September, including Athenian.

Thereafter she was sent to cruise the island of Elba until the Peace of Amiens led to her to being recalled.

Athenian left Gibraltar on 25 August 1802, arrived in Portsmouth on 11 September, and was placed in quarantine. On 24 September she sailed into Portsmouth to be paid off. Her officers and crew were paid off at Portsmouth in October 1802.

Athenienne underwent fitting at Portsmouth between January and March 1804. Captain Francis Fayerman commissioned her there.

Voyage to China (1804-1805)
On 9 June 1804, Athenienne, left St. Helens, Isle of Wight, as escort to nine East Indiamen of the British East India Company bound for China. The Indiamen were Perseverance, Neptune, Taunton Castle, Ceres, Royal Charlotte, Alnwick Castle, True Briton, Arniston, and Cuffnells.

The fleet arrived at Rio de Janeiro around 14-18 August. It then passed the Cape of Good Hope. From here, rather than passing through the Indian Ocean and the Straits of Malacca, the fleet sailed south of Western Australia and through Bass Strait. The objectives were two-fold: to avoid French ships reported to be in the Indian Ocean, and to improve the charting of Bass Strait.

The ships then sailed to Norfolk Island, which was the next rendezvous point after Saint Paul Island, for members that had separated. Taunton Castle had separated in the South Atlantic and although she arrived at Norfolk Island three days after the fleet had sailed on, did not rejoin the rest of the fleet until she arrived at Haerlem Bay, in China.

The arrival of the Athenienne and the East Indiamen at Norfolk Island sowed panic among the colonists there who feared that a French flotilla had arrived.

The fleet arrived at Whampoa in mid-January 1805. The fleet then returned to England via the Straits of Malacca. Arniston, for example, crossed the Second Bar on 14 February, reached Malacca on 21 March and St Helena on 30 June, and arrived at Long Reach on 15 September.

Subsequent service
In October 1805 Captain John Giffard replaced Fayerman. He sailed Athenienne to Gibraltar with stores and supplies for the fleet after the Battle of Trafalgar. on 21 April 1806 Sir Sidney Smith took command off Palermo of a squadron that included Athenienne. She subsequently took part in the reinforcement of the defense of Gaieta (41°13′N 13°34′E), the capture of Capri, and frequent forays to the coast of Calabria.

In the capture of Capri on 12 May Athenien's marines landed and captured the heights, which forced the French to surrender.

In August 1806 Athenienne was in the Mediterranean under Captain Edward Fellowes.

Fate
On 16 October 1806, Athenienne sailed from Gibraltar for Malta under the command of Captain Robert Raynsford, with a crew of 470. In the evening of 20 October, she ran aground on a submerged reef, the Esquirques (37°47′N 10°46′E), in the Strait of Sicily.

The crew cut away ship's masts to prevent her rolling on her side, but nevertheless she flooded to the lower deck ports within half an hour, then rolled over. Captain Raynsford had had an improvised raft constructed. Unfortunately two of the ship's boats were swamped when launching and two others deserted the wreck; after much trouble the ship's launch was freed and got into the water. Over 100 survivors were crammed into her and she was picked up the following day by a Danish brig. In all, 347 people died, including Captain Raynsford, while 141 men and two women were rescued

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Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
11 June 1865 - The Naval Battle of the Riachuelo
is fought on the rivulet Riachuelo (Argentina), between the Paraguayan Navy on one side and the Brazilian Navy on the other. The Brazilian victory was crucial for the later success of the Triple Alliance (Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina) in the Paraguayan War.



The Battle of the Riachuelo was the biggest naval Battle fought by two South American countries and a key point in the Paraguayan War. By late 1864, Paraguay had scored a series of victories in the war; on June 11, 1865, however, its naval defeat by the Brazilian Empire on the Paraná River began to turn the tide in favor of the allies.

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The Battle of Riachuelo by Victor Meirelles

Battle plan
The Paraguayan fleet was a fraction of the size of Brazil's, even before the battle. It arrived at the Fortress of Humaitá on the morning of June the 9th. Paraguayan dictator Francisco Solano López prepared to attack at Riachuelo the ships supporting allied land troops. Nine ships and seven cannon-carrying barges, totaling 44 guns, plus 22 guns and two Congreve rocket batteries from river bank located troops, attacked the Brazilian squadron, nine ships with a total of 68 guns. The Paraguayans had planned a surprise strike before sunrise since they were fully aware that the gross of Imperial Brazilian troops would offboard their steamers in order to sleep on land, leaving thus a small garrison of men to guard and watch their fleet. The original plan had been that, under the dark of the night, the Paraguayan steamers would sneak up to the docked Brazilian vessels and board them outright. No confrontation other than the one carried out by the boarding party was planned, and the Paraguayan steamers were only there to provide cover from the inland battling forces.

Description of battle
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Brazilian steamers crushing the Paraguayan Navy.

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Battle of Riachuelo, stage 1. In this stage, we can see: a) Brazilian fleet goes downstream to meet the Paraguayan fleet; b) Amazonas goes out of the fleet for some reasons, and Jequitinhonha follows her. Then Amazonas returns to the fleet, and Jequitinhonha is heavily attacked by the infantry and artillery on the cliff; c)Due to the absence of Amazonas and Jequitinhonha, Belmonte' becomes an easy target, is heavily attacked and drifts downstream; d) Brazilian fleet then turns around (keeping upstream in order to maintain the stability of the vessels), while Panaiba comes to the aid of Jequitinhonha.

The Paraguayan fleet left the fortress of Humaitá on the night of June 10, 1865, headed to the port of Corrientes. López had given specific orders that they should stealthily approach the docked Brazilian steamers before sunrise and board them, thus leaving the Brazilian ground forces bereft of their navy early on during the war. For this, López sent nine steamers: Tacuarí, Ygureí, Marqués de Olinda, Paraguarí, Salto Guairá, Rio Apa, Yporá, Pirabebé and Yberá; under the command of Captain Meza who was aboard the Tacuarí. However, some two leagues after leaving Humaitá, upon reaching a point known as Nuatá-pytá, the engine of the Yberá broke down. After losing some hours in an attempt to fix it, it was decided to continue with only the remaining 8 steamers.

The fleet arrived at Corrientes after sunrise, however, due to a dense fog, the plan was still executable since most, if not all, Brazilian forces were still on land. However, not following López' orders, Captain Meza ordered that instead of approaching and boarding the docked steamers, the fleet was to continue down the river and fire at the camp and docked vessels as they passed by. The Paraguayans opened fire at 9:25 am.

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Battle of Riachuelo, Stage 2

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Battle of Riachuelo, Stage 3

The Paraguayans passed in a line parallel to the Brazilian fleet and continued downstream. Upon Captain Meza's order, the entire fleet opened fire on the docked Brazilian steamers. The land troops hastily, upon realization that they were under attack, boarded their own ships and began returning fire. One of the Paraguayan steamers was hit in the boiler and one of the "chatas" (barges) was damaged as well. Once out of range, they turned upstream and anchored the barges, forming a line in a very narrow part of the river. This was intended to trap the Brazilian fleet.

Admiral Barroso noticed the Paraguayan tactic and turned down the stream to go after the Paraguayans. However, the Paraguayans started to fire from the shore into the lead ship, Belmonte. The second ship in the line, Jequitinhonha, mistakenly turned upstream and was followed by the whole fleet, thus leaving Belmonte alone to receive the full firepower of the Paraguayan fleet, which soon put it out of action. Jequitinhonha ran aground after the turn, becoming an easy prey for the Paraguayans.

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Battle of Riachuelo. The Brazilian corvette Amazonas rams and sinks the Paraguayan Jejuy.

Admiral Barroso, on board the steamer Amazonas, trying to avoid chaos and reorganize the Brazilian fleet, decided to lead the fleet downstream again and fight the Paraguayans in order to prevent their escape, rather than save Amazonas. Four steamers (Beberibe, Iguatemi, Mearim and Araguari) followed Amazonas. The Paraguayan admiral (Meza) left his position and attacked the Brazilian line, sending three ships after Araguari. Parnaíba remained near Jequitinhonha and was also attacked by three ships that were trying to board it. The Brazilian line was effectively cut in two. Inside Parnaíba a ferocious battle was taking place when the Marquez de Olinda joined the attackers.

Barroso, at this time heading upstream, decided to turn the tide of the battle with a desperate measure. The first ship that faced Amazonas was the Paraguarí which was rammed and put out of action. Then he rammed Marquez de Olinda and Salto, and sank a "chata". At this point Paraguari was already out of action. Therefore, the Paraguayans tried to disengage. Beberibe and Araguari pursued the Paraguayans, heavily damaging Tacuary and the Pirabebé, but nightfall prevented the sinking of these ships.

Jequitinhonha had to be put afire by Paraguari and Marquez de Olinda. In the end, the Paraguayans lost four steamers and all of their "chatas", while the Brazilians only lost the Jequitinhonha, coincidentally the ship responsible for the confusion.

Aftermath and consequences
After the battle, the eight remaining Brazilian steamers sailed down river. President López ordered Major José Maria Brúguez with his batteries to quickly move inland to the south to wait for and attack the passing Brazilian fleet. So the fleet had to run the gauntlet. On August 12, Brúguez attacked the fleet from the high cliffs at Cuevas. Every Brazilian ship was hit, and 21 men were killed.

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Battle of Cuevas

The Paraguarí, which had been rammed by the Amazonas, was set ablaze by the Brazilians; however, the ship had a metal hull. A few months later, López ordered the Yporá to retrieve the hull, tow it to the Jejui River and sink it there.[8] Also, under orders from López, one month after the battle, the Yporá returned to the scene and, again under the cover of the night and stealthily so as to not alarm another Brazilian steamer which was in the location, boarded the remains of the Jequitinhonha and stole one of its cannons.

Meza was wounded by a gunshot to the chest on June 11, during the battle. While he did leave the battle alive, he would die eight days later from this wound while at the Humaitá hospital. López, who upon learning of Meza's death said "Si no hubiera muerto con una bala, debia morir con cuatro" (Had he not died from one gunshot, he would have to die from four), gave orders for no officers to attend his burial.

Manuel Trujillo, one of the Paraguayan soldiers that took part in the Riachuelo battle recalls "When we sailed down river on full steam, passing all the Brazilian steamers on the morning of the eleventh, we were all shocked since we knew that all we had to do was approach the steamers and 'all aboard!'". He also recalls that, during the battle, the land troops who had been taken on the steamers in order to board the Brazilian fleet were shouting "Let's approach the steamers! We came in order to board them and not to be killed on deck!".

Barroso had turned the tables by creatively ramming the enemy ships. The Brazilian navy won a decisive battle. General Robles was effectively stopped in Rio Santa Lúcia. The threat to Argentina was neutralized.


Order of battle
Brazil
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Paraguay
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Riachuelo
 
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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
11 June 1913 - General Concha, a General Concha-class Cañonero (gunboat), wrecked


General Concha was a General Concha-class Cañonero (gunboat) or more technically "Third Class non-armored Cruiser" of the Spanish Navy which fought at San Juan, Puerto Rico, during the Spanish–American War.

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Technical Characteristics
General Concha was built at the naval shipyard Esteiro at Ferrol in Spain, working order #169. She had an iron hull with bow ram, a single funnel, and a light schooner rig. She was the first ship of a class of four gunboats ordered by Admiral Francisco de Paula Pavía y Pavía during his third term as Ministro de Marina (Minister of the Navy). The design was made in Spain. The keel was laid down on 1 May 1882 and the ship was launched on 28 November 1883. The 600 hp engine with two boilers was constructed by La Maquinista Terrestre y Maritima SA in Barcelona at a final cost of 312,000 pesetas and was constructed directly aboard the ship, after being towed from Ferrol to Barcelona by merchant vessel José Pérez. Bunker coal stock capacity was 70–80 tons having an average consumption of 10 tons per day.

Initially, weaponry was led by three main 120 mm "González Hontoria" guns (a heavy armament for a gunboat, which made her being technically categorised as "Cruiser, Third Class" in spite of being a standard gunboat in all other aspects) and three Nordenfelt-type machine guns, 2 x 25 mm and 1 x 11 mm, but sometime after late 1899 the ordnance was changed to a lighter four rapid-fire 42 mm Nordenfelt guns and two 25 mm Maxim machine guns.

She was named after Spanish Navy Brigadier Don Juan Gutiérrez de la Concha, governor of the intendency of Salta del Tucumán, then part of the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata, and explorer of the Patagonia in a 1779 expedition. He was executed by the first independent Argentine government in August 1810, near the city of Cruz Alta, Córdoba, along with Santiago de Liniers and other counter-revolutionaries.

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Operational history
After becoming fully operational and ready for duty the General Concha was assigned to the then Spanish colony of San Juan, Puerto Rico where she served mainly as a coastal surveillance vessel until the Spanish–American War began in April 1898.

The U.S. Navy soon established a permanent blockade of San Juan on 18 June 1898. On 22 June 1898 General Concha, cruiser Isabel II, and destroyer Terror came out of port to test the blockade, resulting in the Second Battle of San Juan (1898). Auxiliary cruisers USS St. Paul and USS Yosemite moved in, resulting in a short, running gun battle, from which the Spanish quickly broke away. Isabel II and General Concha had a poor top speed of 11 knots; Terror made a torpedo run on St. Paul to cover their retreat, and was badly damaged by gunfire from St. Paul, but all three Spanish ships made it back into port at San Juan. Two men had been killed aboard Terror, the only casualties on either side suffered during the battle.

On 28 June 1898, General Concha, Isabel II and gunboat Ponce de León left port again to assist a Spanish blockade runner, the merchant steamer Antonio López, trying to make its way into San Juan's harbor with an important cargo of war supplies. The Yosemite intercepted the Antonio López and attacked it making her run aground in nearby reefs. The General Concha arrived first and engaged the Yosemite, thwarting the efforts of the Americans to disrupt the undergoing salvage operation. The three Spanish warships exchanged long-range gunfire with St. Paul, Yosemite, and cruiser USS New Orleans, with neither side scoring any hits.

After the war the General Concha returned to Spain and her armament was refitted to four rapid-fire 42 mm Nordenfelt guns and two 25 mm Maxim machine guns. She was assigned to the Mediterranean coast of Morocco, as part of the effort to interrupt piracy and arms smuggling by the local cabilas, usually patrolling the area between Melilla and Alhucemas.

Wreckage
On 11 June 1913 General Concha sailed from Almuñécar, Granada in mainland Spain to Alhucemas, a Spanish stronghold in the Moroccan coast. On command of the ship was the Capitán de Corbeta Don Emiliano Castaño Hernández and aboard was (as a passenger) Colonel Basterra. Upon reaching the Moroccan coast the ship encountered dense fog and continued inbound to Alhucemas at slow speed, but lack of sight from coastal references after some time led the crew to misinterpretation of the position of the ship and some five miles out from her destination she violently ran aground near the cove of Busicú at 07:40 local time. This area was de facto controlled by the Bocoy cabila, a group of Morocco rebels fighting the Spaniards.

The ship was trapped among rocks with her bow pointed to the coast, so immediately an anchor was moored from the stern to try to free her, unsuccessfully. A rowboat was lowered to closely evaluate the extent of the hull damage. All bow compartments, the pantry and some engine room sections were flooded, and all rifles stored in the bow armory room were reallocated to the officers' room amidships. The armed boat nr.2 was launched, with eight seamen led by the Alférez de Navío Don Luis Felipe Lazaga with the mission of reaching Alhucemas to communicate the distress of the vessel and also evacuate Colonel Basterra.

The local insurgent forces soon realized the compromised situation of the Spanish vessel and began harassing the crew of the General Concha with spare rifle shots from the nearby cliffs. The crew was forced to fight the attackers and undergo repairs in the damaged bow section at the same time. The bow 120 mm. gun turned out to be inoperative, being partially below waterline. During this first shooting came the first casualties for the crew, Seaman José Piñeiro and Gunner Benítez were hit and died; several other men including the Alférez de Navío Don Rafael Ramos Izquierdo y Gener were also wounded. The doctor, Don Manuel Quignon, improvised a "medical room" in a compartment inside the ship. With a rope he wrapped around himself a mattress as improvised protection and came to the outside deck, exposed to fire, dragging all the wounded and dead to the inside of the ship for treatment.

An attempt was made by three men to reach the aft 120 mm. gun to fire back but now the whole outer deck was well covered by abundant rifle fire and two died (2nd Constable Don Pedro Muiños and a Gunner) and the third one (Gunner Corporal Francisco García Benedicto) was badly wounded. The rest of the crew were forced to stay inside the ship.

About 12:30 h. the attackers left their positions and began an assault on the wrecked ship, boarding her by the partially submerged bow section and taking several prisoners here. But in the aft section the Alférez de Navío Ramos had rallied all remaining and able crew (some 20 or 25 men), most armed with rifles and some others with revolvers and even with axes, and shouting hails to Spain and the King they launched a fierce, desperate counterattack as a last chance to maintain control of the ship, forcing the looters in the bow to withdraw from the deck back to their row boats with many casualties. However they took a total of 11 crew men with them. The commander, D. Emiliano Castaño, was hit two times in the neck and the collarbone and died, and Alférez de Navío Izquierdo had to take command of the remainders of ship and crew.

Having now a bargaining element with the captive men of the crew the pirates ceased the attack and withdraw except for some remaining snipers on the cliffs. A few hours later one of the crew prisoners, Sailor Francisco Estensa, was freed and sent back to the wrecked General Concha with instructions from the rebels to surrender the ship in exchange for spare the lives of prisoners and crew, otherwise they would blow the ship with dynamite. The proposition was considered but not accepted nor answered by the Spanish officers, being the ship already damaged beyond repair, so Sailor Estensa joined the ship crew again. Both parties engaged again in an exchange of rifle fire from fixed positions, as the attackers did not make any further attempt to directly assault the boat.

Finally at 17:00 h. Spanish reinforcements arrived (gunboat Lauria and Steamer Vicente Sáenz) and took the crew to safety.





 

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
11 June 1926 – Launch of Padua, nowadays known as Kruzenshtern or Krusenstern, the last active of the Flying P-Liners


Kruzenshtern or Krusenstern (Russian: Крузенштерн) is a four-masted barque (Russian: барк) that was built in 1926 at Geestemünde in Bremerhaven, Germany as Padua (named after the Italian city). She was surrendered to the USSR in 1946 as war reparation and renamed after the early 19th century Baltic German explorer in Russian service, Adam Johann Krusenstern (1770–1846). She is now a Russian sail training ship.

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Of the four remaining Flying P-Liners, the former Padua is the only one still in use, mainly for training purposes, with her home ports in Kaliningrad (formerly Königsberg) and Murmansk. After Sedov, another former German ship, she is the largest traditional sailing vessel still in operation.

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As Padua
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Under sail

Launched in 1926 as the last of the P-Liners, Padua was commissioned as a cargo ship, used among other things to ship construction material to Chile, South America, returning with saltpeter around Cape Horn. Later she transported wheat from Australia. Her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Talcahuano, Chile took 87 days. In 1933–1934 she took a record-breaking 67 days from Hamburg to Port Lincoln in South Australia. Prior to World War II she made 15 long trips to Chile and Australia. Her fastest voyage was in 1938–1939, from Hamburg via Chile to Australia and back to Hamburg in 8 months and 23 days under Captain Richard Wendt — a world record voyage for tall ships that has never been broken.

Like all P-liners, Padua was painted according to the colours of the German national flag of the German Empire era: black (hull above water, topsides), white (waterline area) and red (underwater body).

As Kruzenshtern
On 12 January 1946 she was surrendered to the USSR and integrated into the Baltic Fleet of the Soviet Navy. She was moored in Kronstadt harbour until 1961 where she underwent major repairs and a refit (e.g. the installation of her first engines) for her missions for the Hydrographic Department of the Soviet Navy. From 1961 to 1965 she undertook many hydrographic and oceanographical surveys for the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean, and Mediterranean, and was used as a training vessel for naval cadets. In 1965 she was transferred to the USSR Ministry of Fisheries in Riga to be used as a schoolship for future fishery officers.

From 1968 to 1972 a major modernisation took place, installing her current set of engines and applying her current hull paint – black with a wide white stripe with black rectangles intended to give the illusion of gunports. Kruzenshtern led the international procession of tall ships into New York Harbor for Operation Sail on 4 July 1976.


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At Sail Bremerhaven 2005

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Line art of Kruzenshtern

In January 1981 she was transferred to the "Estonian Fisheries Industry" at Tallinn and in 1991 she became part of the "State Baltic Academy of the Fisheries" fleet with her new home port in Kaliningrad.

Kruzenshtern takes part in many international regattas. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union funding became a problem, so passengers are carried for that purpose. In 1995–96 she circumnavigated the world in the trail of her namesake. She again sailed around the world in 2005–06 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Krustenstern's circumnavigation.

The ship was used in three German films — Die Meuterei auf der Elsinore (1935); Herz geht vor Anker (1940) and Große Freiheit Nr. 7 (1944), as well as a number of Russian and Soviet films.

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Крузенштерн at SAIL Amsterdam 2005

In 1997 she was the main subject of an Estonian/British documentary produced by Allfilm and First Freedom Productions called 'Tall Ship' and transmitted on Discovery. The one-hour programme was directed by Rein Kotov and produced by Graham Addicott and Pille Runk.

On 23 June 2009 while she was en route to the Charleston, South Carolina Harborfest, her foremast was damaged in a storm off Bermuda when the sail backed and snapped the mast.

On 3 May 2010 she stopped in Bremerhaven after a trip of five months with stops in Vancouver for the 2010 Winter Olympics and in Cuba, after which she returned to Kaliningrad.[citation needed] On 4 August 2014, Kruzenshtern sank the tug Diver Master at Esbjerg, Denmark when a line between the two vessels failed to release. On 11 June 2015, she rammed the two Icelandic Coastguard patrol ships Þór and Týr. Both vessels sustained damage. On 27 June, she ran aground at Archangelsk. She was refloated that day.

Trivia
Padua is shown in the German film Große Freiheit Nr. 7 from 1944 as the ship on which the main actor signs up at the end.

Along with STS Mir, the ship has been one of the main attractions during the Norwegian Constitution Day celebration in Larvik, Vestfold. The ship is usually docked at the main pier and the crew joins the citizens' and children's parade through the city.





 

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
Other Events on 11 June


1675 – Launch of sixth rate frigate HMS Lark, Designed and built by Sir Anthony Deane at Blackwall

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Portrait of the ‘Lark’, sixth rate of 18 guns built in 1675; she was sold in 1698. She is viewed from abaft the port beam. There are possibly ten square decorated ports on a broadside. An elaborate badge with a small light is on the quarter. It is a rapid but very accurate drawing done without the help of an offset



1715 - Occupation Of Majorca, 11th June 1715 - 3rd July 1715

https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_battle&id=1086


1734 - Siege of Danzig, 11th June 1734 - 9th July 1734

On May 26th, 1734, Admiral Gordon left Kronstadt with a fleet of fourteen battleships,[ Petr I. i 11. 100, Sv. Aleksandr 70, Leferm 70, Natalia 66, Slava Eossie 66, Narva 64, Shlisselburg 60, Marlburg 60, Petr 11. 54, Vyborg 54, Riga 54, Novaya Nadezhda 54, Devonshir 52, Panteleimon Viktoria 50.] five frigates, and two bomb vessels. On June 6th he reached Pillau, and on the 11th he moved to Danzig. In the harbour lay a French frigate, the Brillant 30. In the afternoon of June 12th the Russian bomb vessel Yupiter 6, supported by the frigates Arondel 50 and Esperans 44 [Both probably had reduced armament] approached the French ship and opened fire. After about an hour's action the Brillant withdrew, under the guns of Weichselmiinde. From the 15th onwards the shore batteries were bombarded by the bomb vessels Yupiter 6 and Donder 6 and the frigates Esperans 44 and Star Femks 36, in conjunction with the land forces, and on the 23rd the fortress of Weichselmiinde surrendered. With it the Russians got possession of three French ships, the Brillant 30, a hoy of fourteen guns, and a pram of eight. On June 29th the fleet left Danzig, on July 9th it visited Revel, and on the 13th it was back at Kronstadt. Danzig was forced to capitulate on July 9th, but Stanislaus escaped. He abandoned his claims on the Polish throne, which was given to Augustus III., and in return was made Duke of Lorraine with the title of King. Louis XV. was pacified by the promise that on the death of Stanislaus, Lorraine, formerly part of the Empire, should pass to France

https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_battle&id=625


1755 – Launch of Spanish Vencedor (San Julian) 68 (launched 11 June 1755 at Ferrol) - transferred to France 1806, renamed Argonaute, captured by Spain 1808, renamed Vencedor, wrecked 1810

Eolo class all ordered 1752 at Ferrol (Esteiro Dyd), 68 guns
Eolo (San Juan de Dios) 68 (launched 1753 at Ferrol) - Stricken 20 March 1864
Oriente (San Diego de Alcala) 68 (launched 15 August 1753 at Ferrol) - Stricken 27 September 1806
Aquilón (San Dámaso) 68 (launched 10 March 1754 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, later renamed HMS Moro, BU 1770
Neptuno (San Justo) 68 (launched 6 July 1754 at Ferrol) - Scuttled 11 August 1762
Magnánimo (San Pastor) 68 (launched 30 November 1754 at Ferrol) - Wrecked 12 July 1794
Gallardo (San Juan de Sahagún) 68 (launched 18 October 1754 at Ferrol) - Scuttled 16 February 1797
Brillante (San Dionisio) 68 (launched 20 August 1754 at Ferrol) - Burnt 10 October 1790
Vencedor (San Julian) 68 (launched 11 June 1755 at Ferrol) - transferred to France 1806, renamed Argonaute, captured by Spain 1808, renamed Vencedor, wrecked 1810
Glorioso (San Francisco Javier) 74 (launched 29 January 1755 at Ferrol) - stricken 5 May 1818 to BU
Guerrero (San Raimundo) 68 (launched 27 March 1755 at Ferrol) - BU 1844
Soberano (San Gregorio) 68 (launched 9 August 1755 at Ferrol) - Captured by Britain 11 August 1762, retaining same name, BU 1770
Héctor (San Bernardo) 68 (launched 22 September 1755 at Ferrol) - stricken 11 June 1768 and BU 1790


1761 – End of Expedition against Belle/Isle, 29th March 1761 - 11th June

https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_battle&id=368


1761 - HMS Argo (28) versus french Duc de Biron (20), 11th June 1761

Captain King of His Majesty's Ship the Argo, gives an account, in his letter dated at the Nore, the 17th Instant, of his arrival there, with the Marechal Duc de Biron Snow, a French Privateer of 15 Guns, 6-Pounders (pierced for 20) 12 Swivels, and 109 Men, which was taken, by the Argo,on the Instant, after a chace of eight hours.
The said privateer sailed from Dunkirk the 7 th of January last, on a cruize to the Westward, and her cruize being expired, was returning to Dunkirk, having on board the ransomers named in the following List:
Ships "Alexander", "Boyle", "Polly", "Friendship", "Kennington", "Neptune" ransomned and hostages on board

https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_battle&id=1074


1762 - Siege of El Morro, 11th June 1762 - 30th July 1762

A subsidiary action to the Operations against Havanna
Detached from the main fleet on 1st July, the bombardment by these vessels was ineffective. The suffered severe damage and 192 casualties.

https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_battle&id=1054


1770 – British explorer Captain James Cook runs aground on the Great Barrier Reef.

Continuing north, on 11 June a mishap occurred when Endeavour ran aground on a shoal of the Great Barrier Reef, and then "nursed into a river mouth on 18 June 1770". The ship was badly damaged, and his voyage was delayed almost seven weeks while repairs were carried out on the beach (near the docks of modern Cooktown, Queensland, at the mouth of the Endeavour River)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook


1800 Boats of Rear Ad. Sir John B. Warrens's squadron, HMS Renown (74), HMS Fisgard (44), HMS Defence (74) and HMS Unicorn (32), cut out gunboat Nochette (2) two armed chasse-maree and eight other vessels at St. Croix within the Penmarks. Twenty other vessels were run on to the rocks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Renown_(1798)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Résistance_(1796)


1807 – Birth of James F. Schenck, American admiral (d. 1882)

James Findlay Schenck
(11 June 1807 – 21 December 1882) was a rear admiral in the United States Navy who served in the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War.



1808 Boats of HMS Euryalus (36) and HMS Cruizer (18) burnt two large troop transports and captured a gun-vessel (2) off the Naskon.

On 11 June 1808, Euryalus and Cruizer discovered several vessels at anchor close to shore at the entrance to the river Naskon. Dundas anchored at dark and sent a cutting out party in four boats from the two ships to destroy the vessels. The cutting out party burnt two large troop transports and retrieved a gun-vessel armed with two 18-pounders and carrying 64 men. The successful foray took place directly under the guns of a Danish battery of three 18-pounder guns and numerous enemy troops who lined the shore. The enemy lost seven men killed and twelve wounded; the British had one man slightly wounded. In 1816 the crews of the British ships received prize money for "Danish gun-boat E".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Euryalus_(1803)


1809 - HMS Solebay 1785 - on lease to Trinity House from 1803 to 1806, wrecked in action with a Senegalese fort on 11 June 1809.

HMS Solebay
(1785) was a 32-gun fifth rate launched in 1785 and wrecked in 1809. Along with HMS Derwent, they were the first ships in the West Africa Squadron that the British government had established to interdict and end the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade.

j5834.jpg

Amazon (Thetis) class 32-gun fifth rates 1773-87; 18 ships, designed by John Williams.
HMS Thetis 1773 - ran onto a rock and sank near Saint Lucia on 12 May 1781.
HMS Amazon 1773 - broken up in 1794.
HMS Ambuscade 1773 - taken by the French corvette Bayonnaise in 1798, retaken by HMS Victory in 1803, broken up 1810.
HMS Cleopatra 1779 - broken up 1814.
HMS Amphion 1780 - accidentally caught fire and blew up at Portsmouth on 22 September 1796.
HMS Orpheus 1780 - wrecked on a coral reef in the West Indies on 23 January 1807.
HMS Juno 1780 - broken up 1811.
HMS Success 1781 - taken by the French in the Mediterranean on 13 February 1801, retaken seven month later by HMS Pomone on 2 September, converted to troopship in 1812, hulked as prison ship at Halifax in 1813, broken up in 1820.
HMS Iphigenia 1780 - hulked as prison hospital ship at Plymouth in 1798, converted to troopship in 1801, accidentally burnt in the same year.
HMS Andromache 1781 - broken up 1811.
HMS Syren (or Siren) 1782 - hulked as lazaretto at Pembroke in 1805, broken up in 1822.
HMS Iris 1783 - on lease to Trinity House between 1803 and 1805, hulked as receiving ship at Yarmouth in 1811, presented to the Marine Society as a training ship, broken up in 1833.
HMS Greyhound 1783 - wrecked in the Philippines on 4 October 1808.
HMS Meleager 1785 - wrecked on Triangle Bank in the Gulf of Mexico on 9 June 1801.
HMS Castor 1785 - sold 1819.
HMS Solebay 1785 - on lease to Trinity House from 1803 to 1806, wrecked in action with a Senegalese fort on 11 June 1809.
HMS Terpsichore 1785 - hulked as receiving ship at Chatham in 1811, broken up 1813.
HMS Blonde 1787 - hulked for stationary service at Portsmouth in 1803, sold 1805.



1826 - Los Pozos (Quilmes) - 11 Argentine vessels under William Brown defeat 31 Brazilian vessels near Buenos Aires


1847 – Death of John Franklin, English admiral and politician (b. 1786)


Sir John Franklin
KCH FRGS (16 April 1786 – 11 June 1847) was a British Royal Navy officer and explorer of the Arctic. Franklin also served as Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen's Land from 1837 to 1843. He disappeared while on his last expedition, attempting to chart and navigate the Northwest Passage in the North American Arctic. The icebound ships were abandoned and the entire crew died of starvation, hypothermia, tuberculosis, lead poisoning, zinc deficiency and scurvy.

John_Franklin.jpg



1854 - Bombardment of Sevastopol, 11th June 1854


https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_battle&id=595


1871 - During the Korean Expedition, Rear Adm. John Rodgers squadron lands a party of 650 Marines and Sailors to attack and capture Fort McKee (also known as the Citadel), Korea. Fifteen receive the Medal of Honor for their action during the capture of the Korean fort.


1898 - During the Spanish American War, 1st Lt. Herbert Draper, USMC, First Marine Battalion, raises the U.S. flag for the first time at Camp McCalla, Guantanamo, Cuba. Camp McCalla is named in honor of Cmdr. Bowman H. McCalla, Commanding Officer of USS Marblehead (C 11) who is also designated to command the new base.


1927 - USS Memphis (CL 13) arrives at Washington, D.C., with Charles Lindbergh and his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, after his non-stop flight across the Atlantic. Later that day, Lindbergh becomes the first person to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross when President Calvin Coolidge presents the award at the Washington Monument grounds.


1944 - Aircraft from (VC 95) based onboard USS Croatan (CVE 25), along with USS Frost (DE 144), USS Huse (DE 145), and USS Inch (DE 146), sink German submarine (U 490) between Flores Island and Flemish Cap.


1944 – USS Missouri, the last battleship built by the United States Navy and future site of the signing of the Japanese Instrument of Surrender, is commissioned.


USS Missouri (BB-63)
("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo") is an Iowa-class battleship and was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named after the U.S. state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship commissioned by the United States and is best remembered as the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II.

Missouri_post_refit.jpg

Missouri was ordered in 1940 and commissioned in June 1944. In the Pacific Theater of World War II she fought in the battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa and shelled the Japanese home islands, and she fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. She was decommissioned in 1955 into the United States Navy reserve fleets (the "Mothball Fleet"), but reactivated and modernized in 1984 as part of the 600-ship Navy plan, and provided fire support during Operation Desert Storm in January/February 1991.

Missouri received a total of 11 battle stars for service in World War II, Korea, and the Persian Gulf, and was finally decommissioned on 31 March 1992 after serving a total of 17 years of active service, but remained on the Naval Vessel Register until her name was struck in January 1995. In 1998, she was donated to the USS Missouri Memorial Association and became a museum ship at Pearl Harbor.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Missouri_(BB-63)


1983 – Launch of Giuseppe Garibaldi is an Italian aircraft carrier, the first through deck aviation ship ever built for the Italian Navy, and the first Italian ship built to operate fixed-wing aircraft.

ITS_Giuseppe_Garibaldi_(C_551).jpg

 

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With Today we finalized a complete calendar Year


Many Many Thanks for your interest - also for the comments and all the Likes I received during this year

for
12 June

see:
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I know, that in the beginning of this topic, we added not so much events every day, but I will try to add "new" events with the time
 

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
11 June 2019

With Today we finalized a complete calendar Year


Many Many Thanks for your interest - also for the comments and all the Likes I received during this year

for
12 June

see:
https://shipsofscale.com/sosforums/threads/june-11-today-in-naval-history-naval-maritime-events-in-history.2104/#post-33125

I know, that in the beginning of this topic, we added not so much events every day, but I will try to add "new" events with the time
The circle is now complete,thank Uwe for this big task and your time!!
 

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