Book review Book Review: "PADDLE WARSHIPS: The Earliest Steam Power Fighting Ships 1815-1850" by D.K. Brown

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Book Review: Paddle Warships: The Earliest Steam Powered Fighting Ships 1815-1850
Series: Ship Types
by D.K. Brown

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  • Series: Ship Types
  • Hardcover: 94 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Inst Pr (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 0.5 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds

Synopsis:

Conway´s Ship Types
A series outlining the development of specific ship types, based upon the huge plans collection at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.
This volume "Paddle Warships" deals with the introduction of steam power into naval warfare in the form of paddle propulsion. The progress of naval architecture from sailing ships, with minimal alteration to accomodate angines, towards purpose designed steamships, and their influence on the introduction of iron hulls, makes this period particularly important. The historical significance of these early steamers cannot be over-emphasised.
The book is divided into two halves:
Part I is a designj history and charts the progress of naval steam through individual ships and classes, and sets out the essential details of the ships in numerous tables.
Part II deals with such general aspects of the ships as hull structure, machinery, paddle wheels, armament, internal arrangements and performance.
Many of the first paddlers were experimental trials platforms rather than true warships, but their inclusion is essential in order to tell a complete story. For the same reason, the Post Office packets, which represents a crucially important stage in naval sevelopment, are also included.

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left side: HMS Argus paddle sloop 1847
right side: List Early steam warships, HMS Alban 1831


Contents:

PART I: DESIGN HISTORY (page 9 to 63)
1) Background: Early Steam Warships
2) Transitional Ships
3) Hermes and Derivatives
4) Gorgon, Cyclops and their Derivatives
5) Later Sloops and Second Class Frigates
6) First Class Frigates
7) Miscellaneous Steam Vessels
PART II: THE SHIPS (page 64 to 80)
8) Design and Structure
9) Machinery and Paddle Trials
10) Paddle Steamer Trials
11) Sailing Characteristics and Seaworthiness
12) Armament and Fittings
13) Builders
Appendix: Post Office Packets (page 81 to 88)

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left side: HMS Tartarus profile, HMS Rhadarmanthus 1833
right side: HMS Hermes, HMS Volcano "Floating Factory" repair ship 1854



about the author David K. Brown:

David Brown joined the Royal Corps of Naval Constructors in 1949, retiring in 1988 as Deputy Chief Naval Architect. He has been involved in the design of many classes of warships and in supporting research work. In particular, he has spent many years on screw propeller design and research into their problems which forms a fascinating parallel with the work of the designers of paddle vessels--the new technology of their day--described in this volume.

Other publications ba D.K.Brown:
Warrior to Dreadnought: Warship Development 1860-1905
The Grand Fleet: Warship Design and Development 1906-1922
Nelson to Vanguard: Warship Design and Development 1923-1945
The Eclipse of the Big Gun: The Warship. 1906-45
Rebuilding the Royal Navy: Warship Design since 1945
Atlantic Escorts: Ships, Weapons and Tactics in World War II
Before the Ironclad: Development of Ship Design, Propulsion, and Armament in the Royal navy 1815-60

and some others .....

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left side: HMS Gorgon lines plan, HMS Gorgon at Plymouth
right side: HMS Bulldog (Gorgon derivative), HMS Firebrand derived from HMS Cyclope, HMS Vulture second class frigate



Review:

Also for this series the book a relative thin volume, but tremendously informative on Royal Navy paddle warships. Going through the list of published books by Brown, he is without discussion one of the most experienced book writer in the later area, also off course based on his profession.
Although the 'Steam Navy' did not come into being until the WARRIOR entered service as the first British ironclad in 1860, the Royal Navy had been flirting and experimenting with steam since the close of the Napoleonic Wars 45 years earlier, and between 1815 and 1850 had built up a small fighting force that relied on paddle propulsion. The first part of this study is a design history based on the important collection of plans at Greenwich, it charts the progress of naval steam through individual ships and classes. In the second part the author examines hull structure, machinery, paddle wheels, armament, internal arrangements and performance. He also includes the Post Office packets which played a crucially important role in naval development. A neglected area of naval history put to rights in this profusely illustrated study.
A very well prepared documentation, clear and interesting information, well presented -> highly recommended book

More Look Inside photos of this book review you can find in the following post ......
 
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Uwek

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Book Review: Paddle Warships: The Earliest Steam Powered Fighting Ships 1815-1850
Series: Ship Types

by D.K. Brown

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left side: Profile and Upper deck of HMS Maginienne, HMS Furious, HMS Sphynx
right side: HMS Triton 1845 iron sloop of Antelope class, HMS Janus, HMS Trident first iron fighting ship


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left side: HMS Penelope (sailing frigate converted to paddle propulsion, HMS Retribution
right side: HMS Wilberforce and HMS Albert 1840, Bee an instructional tender for Naval College


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left side: HMS Salamander lower deck, HMS Hermes structural detail, HMS Tartarus
right side: side lever engine of Dee 1825, Machinery of HMS Hecla and HMS Hecate 1830


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left side: table of sail areas, sketches of HMS Phoenix
right side: HMS Widgeon, one of fastest mail packets,
HMS Dover

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left side: HMS Recruit 1851, HMS Helicon 1861
right side: model of HMS Tiger (lost in Crimean War, HMS Tiger sail plan
 
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