Completion of Oliver Cromwell

janos

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Ship's wheel and the takelage to the rudder is finished and the rudder is working!

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Eight working pulleys are made. The length of them is 4.5 mm, the sheaves are 2.5 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick. Shaft is 1mm.
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The ship wheel's drum is running on brass shaft and on brass sheaves. The binnacle will still be secured with ropes.

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Well, I just wanted to upload a video (mp4) file to show how it works but the forum does not accept it. Believe me, it is working! I am quite pleased with it as this was the first time I made something like this.
Janos
 

Uwek

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Hallo Janos,
it is looking very good - and I believe you, although I would like to see it working - one possibility would be to upload it to youtube and mention here the link - with this the video would be visible here in your topic (done already !!!1) - thanks for it)
 

Canoe21

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Hello Janos
I just found your working Wheel and Rudder, great job. I have been thinking of exactly the same thing and here you go and solve all of the building problems for me.
One question and that is what kind of wood did you use to build your working blocks? Enjoy
Regards Lawrence
 
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janos

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Thanks, guys! In the mean time I realized (after I had been told ) that the arrangement worked the wrong way around. This is a typical example that someone can't see the forest from the trees... But I reversed it now, it works the right way. Now the rudder turns to starboard if I rotate the ship's wheel to the right...I will post another video with my apologies.
Lawrence I used American Boxwood for the blocks, as for nearly everything on this ship. The blocks are not made the usual way, I built them of 3 layers, and the mid layer has already the cut-out for the sheave before they are glued together. After that the blocks are shaped, the grooves cut and the holes for the shaft are drilled. The sheave is turned from brass and the shaft is brass too. The sheave diameter is 2.5 mm which is as per literature 5 times the rope dia, this latter being 0.5 mm. I think this is the smalles block I would be able to make and was a bit of hassle to put the together.
Janos
 

janos

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The next step with my Oliver Cromwell. Tafferel decorations are now installed. Masts are re-made (originally they were made of some unknown quality and type commercially available material, but their colour and appearance was not consistent, so I decided to replace them with Costello, fully self-made) and even the bowsprit was replaced, which was already installed. The mast tops are made of Swiss Pear and originally I wanted to leave them in natural colour, but I did not like the appearance, so I painted them black as it is in the Hahn-book. The masts are lose yet, first I have to make the wooldings on them.
Janos

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janos

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Thanks, Gents!

A few questions regarding masting / rigging of Oliver. As the plans of Oliver did not have any rigging plan, I am using Rattlesnake's rigging plan - I built this ship previously but without masts /yards/rigging.

What about belaying pins? The drawings of other Hahn models do not show any trace of them. They were surely in use that time but were they used on Oliver? If yes, where were were the racks for them?

Mast woolding. The drawings and Hahn'reports are somewhat misleading and they are in contradiction with each other. Did the mast have wouldings and/or timber rings?
Tx ind advance
Janos
 

NMBROOK

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Fantastic work Janos,she is a wonderful model in the making.You mention that the framing is Costello Boxwood.Have you applied any finish to this?I am curious as the wood has a lovely golden brown hue to it.I am evaluating timber and availability in the UK for a future project and have found a supplier that sells Costello Boxwood in big,more economical chunks.May make a nice alternative to Swiss Pear for the framing as pricing is not massively different.Same supplier also has a chunk of African Ebony,five times more expensive than the Costello based on volume,probably enough for the wales on 50 models though:oops:

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

janos

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Thanks, Nigel.
This model has been built some 25+ years ago. Framing and some internal structure as well as most of the external planking had been done then. I just continued the build from this point with all the desks and everything above them. So the time has an important factor how the colours look. Have a look at the rudder and the framing next to it. Or the gun port covers and the surrounding planking. They are exactly the same material, the difference is only their age. Framing and nearly everything else had been made of some sort of American Boxwood and I have the same material, virtually untouched ie. same age as the hull itself. This material has not been exposed to external light so it did not age that much - see the colour differences. The quality of the Costelo is exceptional, very consistent. I am not sure about the Ebony whether or not it is African, but again, it is exceptional quality, fully black all the way through. I want to emphasize this because I bought some Ebony a few years ago and it has only a few black spots in it, and the vast majority of it has some sort of inconsistent non-descript greyish colour. So it is a matter of luck what you get online unless you have the choice of checking it before purchasing it. The Swiss Pear I have also with the ship is also very consistent in colour and texture - otherwise the situation is the same as with Ebony.
As I started on the ship it did not have any appearent finish. So I sanded everything as I could and applied 2 coats of wipe-on satin polyurethane. I am using the same finish also on the 'new' sections.
Janos
 
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