DocBlake's HMS Blandford Cross Section Build - 1/32 Scale

Norway

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Nice work Dave, Etching with formic acid how does it work, I just know it's something the farmers are using.
 

DocBlake

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I need to install the elm tree pumps before I finish framing the main deck. I'll need access to the lower deck to pin and glue the pumps down.

The first step is to cut a piece of 5/16" square boxwood into an octagon on the table saw. This isn't necessarily historically accurate, but I like the look. I found the center of the octagon on the ends and starting with a 1/16" bit, started drilling out the ends with successively larger bits until I got the size I wanted. The inside of the hole will be painted flat black. Then I made the handles and the brackets for the handles. I cut the handle brackets to size then used a razor saw to cut the groove where the handles fit. I enlarged the cut with first a single thickness of sandpaper, folded it to double and sanded some more then tripled it and finally finished with a 1/16" emery board. The handles are 1/16" stock. II still have to make the spigots. The pumps will be cut so they have a 5 degree "lean" from vertical so they can enter the well.


elm3.jpgelm2.jpgelm1.jpg
 

DocBlake

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Hi Jim!

Let me start by saying that I LOVE my Byrnes saw! It is the best designed and machined tool that I own, and that includes all my full sized power tools. The only shortcoming the Byrnes has is the lack of a tilting arbor! The only way to make angled cuts on a Byrnes is to use the "tilt table" attachment. It is fiddly and takes forever to set up. I used it once, and I've not used it since. I went out and bought a Proxxon FET saw with a tilting arbor!

Cutting an octagon is easy. First make sure you have a piece of wood with a square profile exactly the same size as your finish piece. Something soft like pine or bass wood works well. You'll set up the angle of cut and the fence on the "scrap" piece before cutting your good stock.

Set the blade angle to 45 degrees and set the fence so that when you push the wood into the blade while holding it against the fence, you cut off a little of the the lower corner of the piece that is away from the fence. Turn the stock 90 degrees and cut off another corner. Look at the top three facets you've created. You want them to be identical. Move the fence toward the blade or away from the blade in small increments until they are. The cuts only need to be an inch or so long, so when you make an adjustment to the fence you can cut off the end and start with a "fresh " blank.

Once the fence is set, rotate the stock 90 degrees and cut off the remaining two "corners". The little octagon I cut in the pictures took me less than 5 minutes to do. One thing, though. You should have a zero clearance insert for the 45 degree blade angle. Proxxon gives you one extra, and you can order more. Simple!


oct1.jpgoct2.jpgoct3.jpgoct4.jpg
 

David Lester

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Dave, that works really well with beautiful results and the great thing is when there's no need to push the piece all the way through, you can maintain good control.

Jim - I have never tried making an octagon on a table saw, either large or small, but I know that Norm Abram from the New Yankee Workshop did a pencil post bed which he made without tilting the blade. He made a jig which held the post securely, then he rotated the post within the jig. It worked well for a six foot post, not sure if it's practical at this scale, but it might be adaptable. The project is in his book "Classics from the New Yankee Workshop" and I'm sure the video of it is available on the website.
David
 

tedboat

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Hi Jim!

Let me start by saying that I LOVE my Byrnes saw! It is the best designed and machined tool that I own, and that includes all my full sized power tools. The only shortcoming the Byrnes has is the lack of a tilting arbor! The only way to make angled cuts on a Byrnes is to use the "tilt table" attachment. It is fiddly and takes forever to set up. I used it once, and I've not used it since. I went out and bought a Proxxon FET saw with a tilting arbor!

Cutting an octagon is easy. First make sure you have a piece of wood with a square profile exactly the same size as your finish piece. Something soft like pine or bass wood works well. You'll set up the angle of cut and the fence on the "scrap" piece before cutting your good stock.

Set the blade angle to 45 degrees and set the fence so that when you push the wood into the blade while holding it against the fence, you cut off a little of the the lower corner of the piece that is away from the fence. Turn the stock 90 degrees and cut off another corner. Look at the top three facets you've created. You want them to be identical. Move the fence toward the blade or away from the blade in small increments until they are. The cuts only need to be an inch or so long, so when you make an adjustment to the fence you can cut off the end and start with a "fresh " blank.

Once the fence is set, rotate the stock 90 degrees and cut off the remaining two "corners". The little octagon I cut in the pictures took me less than 5 minutes to do. One thing, though. You should have a zero clearance insert for the 45 degree blade angle. Proxxon gives you one extra, and you can order more. Simple!


View attachment 105459View attachment 105460View attachment 105461View attachment 105462
Hi Dave,
I fully endorse your comments about the Byrnes Saw - it is brilliant.
As you say, the only drawback is the lack of tilt capability, and the tilt plate he provides is awkward to use. I've also only used it once!
I also have his thicknesser and sander, and I'm using them all the time. They cost a bomb to import from the US, and I have to run them using a step-up transformer to suit the voltage in the UK, but still worth every penny.
For octagons and the like I use a home-made travelling jig, probably similar to the one David Lester mentions, and generally made-up at the time to suit the job.

Great work on the cross-section - following with great interest - your workmanship is superb!

Ted
 

DocBlake

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Hi Dave,
I fully endorse your comments about the Byrnes Saw - it is brilliant.
As you say, the only drawback is the lack of tilt capability, and the tilt plate he provides is awkward to use. I've also only used it once!
I also have his thicknesser and sander, and I'm using them all the time. They cost a bomb to import from the US, and I have to run them using a step-up transformer to suit the voltage in the UK, but still worth every penny.
For octagons and the like I use a home-made travelling jig, probably similar to the one David Lester mentions, and generally made-up at the time to suit the job.

Great work on the cross-section - following with great interest - your workmanship is superb!

Ted
Thanks, guys!

Fitting a jig for the occasional octagon is certainly reasonable. The only thing I use octagons for is elm tree pumps and windlasses! Not “every day” work!
 

DocBlake

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I've been thinking about the mast. The first photo is my finished mast. It's tall, and the first wolding is high above the deck. The second photo is a mockup I made with a dowel and some tape. It is shorter and the lowest wolding is just above the bitts. The third photo is from the AOTS book. I think I like the shorter mast better. What do you all say?



Img_0446.jpgImg_0448.jpgwolding.jpg
 

Jimsky

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Hi Dave, I like the sorter... One more thing if you don't mind. Originally the mats were assembled from a series of square timbers joined to each other. Since you will show just a fraction of your masts, it makes sense to show it as the original construction. What do you think?

106329
 

Uwek

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In my opinion also the shorter one ......

Hi Dave, I like the sorter... One more thing if you don't mind. Originally the mats were assembled from a series of square timbers joined to each other. Since you will show just a fraction of your masts, it makes sense to show it as the original construction. What do you think?

View attachment 106329
It is hard to show this detail in a model, but already seen......
on complete model you see only the vertical joints slightly, so it is making often no sense - here with only a short stock you would see the cross section of the mast....
maybe only to "paint" the joints
 

DocBlake

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I finished framing the main deck today. It still needs final sanding as well as planking and a couple of coats of poly. I'll plank the port side to accommodate 2 cannons and leave the starboard side unplanked.
Fitting the elm tree pumps was a real pain. They stand at an angle of 5 degrees, and the handles are long. If the handle placement is off the tiniest hair, the handle positions won't match and will be obvious because they are so long. Mine don't match perfectly, but I have to live with them!




IMG_0449.JPGIMG_0452.JPGIMG_0453.JPGIMG_0454.JPGIMG_0456.JPGe to
 
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