DocBlake's HMS Blandford Cross Section Build - 1/32 Scale

DocBlake

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
816
Points
173

Location
Pewaukee, Wisconsin
I decided to use black treenails simulating bolts to fasten the deck clamps and one strake on either side of the hold floor. All the other strakes and footwaling treenails are birch toothpicks. I don't think the effect is over done at all. The deck clamps are swiss pear, as will be the deck framing. The lighting makes the beech look reddish.IMG_0345.JPGIMG_0347.JPGIMG_0349.JPGIMG_0351.JPGIMG_0353.JPG
 

ziled68

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2017
Messages
174
Points
78

Dave,
Good call on your part. The combination of black and birch treenails is well balanced so it does not overpower a persons view. Keep sailing Brother, I'll be riding your wake like a dolphin.

Ray
 

DocBlake

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
816
Points
173

Location
Pewaukee, Wisconsin
Thanks for the kind words and the “likes” guys! More to come.

For some reason the decks on my build don’t narrow moving aft as much as the plans. I’ll have to resize the deck beams back there. As long as I keep the centerline consistent, and keep the notches for the carlings etc.in proper relationship to the centerline, I should be good!.
 

DocBlake

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
816
Points
173

Location
Pewaukee, Wisconsin
The lower deck beams are 9/32" wide and 3/16" thick. I laid them out on some 9/32" swiss pear stock and cut them out with the scroll saw. I left them a little long to fine-tune the fit. They cleaned up easily with sanding blocks. Time to get serious about deck framing!Img_1096.jpgImg_1098.jpg
 

DocBlake

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
816
Points
173

Location
Pewaukee, Wisconsin
As you can see above, the beams have a rabbet on the ends that sits on the shelf that is the upper surface of the clamps. It's important to get the depth right and consistent on all 4 beams so the framing/decking sits flat, with no high spots or low spots. It's also critical that the beams fit between the clamps with no side-to-side play so that the centerline of each beam stays truly at the centerline. All the mortises for the carlings, ledges arm beams etc. are referenced off the centerlines of the beams. It took me well over 2 hours to custom fit the 4 lower deck beams! I think it will pay off during the remaining deck framing.

I wanted to say that some might be tempted to use beams with no camber, creating a flat deck. If you have access to a scroll saw, by all means try cutting the camber on it. It was much easier than I expected, and it cleaned up quickly with sanding blocks. Just leave a "sliver" of white paper around the pattern to allow for the sanding.

You can see a difference in the color of the model due to lighting. The photo below was taken in my basement shop, equipped for full sized woodworking and has all florescent lighting with halogen work lights in some places.
beams.jpg
 

donfarr

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
1,013
Points
173

Hi Dave, I did not do it your way and that was a MISTAKE, still came out OK, but just barely, like Mike41 said I now have the MAIN DECK FRAMING TO CORRECT MY MISTAKES, looking forward to when you get there to see how it works, GREAT BUILD AS ALWAYS WITH YOUR WORK. Don
 

Norway

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2018
Messages
437
Points
173

Hello again DOC, i fogat to ask about the glue you are using to glu pattern on ex: rabbit, bukheads an so on, before you are cut them
out of the material, i want to see if i kan find somting simeler here in norway.
KNUT
 

ziled68

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2017
Messages
174
Points
78

Hello Knut,
Many people use spray adhesive when applying their patterns to wood. What you do is apply a light coat behind the pattern and a light coat on the wood. Allow a little time for the glue to become tacky and then you can place your pattern. This method is similar to contact cement but not as strong. There are many brands to choose from. The one below is just an example. I hope this helps.

Ray

23716-1006-3ww-l.jpg
 

DocBlake

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
816
Points
173

Location
Pewaukee, Wisconsin
Don: The camber on the lower deck is really slight. Looking at pictures of Mike's lower deck framing and yours, it's hard to see a difference. They both look flat, even though Mike put the camber in his beams! I think the camber will be more noticeable on the main deck, though.

Knut: I use rubber cement to attach paper templates to wood. It rubs off easily, and a quick wipe with acetone picks up any residual. I'm sure you can find the equivalent in a Norwegian office supply store.Elmer's rubber cement.JPG
 

Norway

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2018
Messages
437
Points
173

TNX DAVE and RAY.

Tomorrow im going to look araund in dirent shops,
The produkt DAVE showing to i think is more safe sinse DAVE have alreddy tryed the glue, but i hawe to say that i
never heard absut this product here in noway.

Time will show.

KNUT
 

donfarr

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
1,013
Points
173

Thank you Dave, I have done a sample of the MAIN DECK BEAMS, will post, waiting for material to come in. Don
 

Peglegreg

Moderator
Staff member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
1,617
Points
173

Location
Central Coast NSW
TNX DAVE and RAY.

Tomorrow im going to look araund in dirent shops,
The produkt DAVE showing to i think is more safe sinse DAVE have alreddy tryed the glue, but i hawe to say that i
never heard absut this product here in noway.

Time will show.

KNUT
G'day Knut
I found rubber cement from a tyre supply store. It is used to fix punches in tyres.
 

Norway

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2018
Messages
437
Points
173

[QUOTE = "Peglegreg, post: 50257, member: 4775"] G'day Knut
I found the rubber cement from a tire supply store. It is used to fix bumps in tires. [/ QUOTE]

Mayby it is the same type of glue we use when we patch a bicycle deck.
 

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
6,246
Points
173

Location
Vienna, Austria
I am not sure, if you talk about the same kind of glue!

The so called "rubber cement" is not produced to glue rubber or gum -
Rubber cement is simply a mixture of solid rubber in a volatile solvent that will dissolve it and favored in art applications where easy and damage-free removal of adhesive is desired. especially from paper or card boards. Dave showed one product from ELMER´s , we in Europe are using very often the glue from producer MARABU named Fixogum

fixogum-rubber-cement-elastischer-montagekleber.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_cement

For the tires you use a cement which is vulcanizing the rubber
 

Norway

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2018
Messages
437
Points
173

I am not sure, if you talk about the same kind of glue!

The so called "rubber cement" is not produced to glue rubber or gum -
Rubber cement is simply a mixture of solid rubber in a volatile solvent that will dissolve it and favored in art applications where easy and damage-free removal of adhesive is desired. especially from paper or card boards. Dave showed one product from ELMER´s , we in Europe are using very often the glue from producer MARABU named Fixogum

View attachment 71462

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_cement

For the tires you use a cement which is vulcanizing the rubber

TNX, hwere did you by this glue, if it is on internet, i kan buy it there, or els i hawe to try out other diferent types we hawe in norway
 

Mike41

Moderator
Staff member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Messages
783
Points
173

Hi Norway,
I use the adhesive spray to attach the patterns to the wood, it is fast and easy. Various brands are available on the internet.
Mike
 

DocBlake

Well-Known Member
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Jan 24, 2015
Messages
816
Points
173

Location
Pewaukee, Wisconsin
All the deck beams are cut out and marked for notching, as are the lodging knees. I'll hold off on cutting out the hanging knees until I'm ready to fit them to the model so I can adjust their thickness so they fit the space between the end of the lodging knee and the beam exactly.

In the meantime I went to work on the well and shot locker. The wood is swiss pear. I did opt for an access door which was framed in. The door measure 32" wide by 56" high in scale. I still need to add an additional coat of poly, then remove the sheen from the black hardware using Dull-Cote lacquer. The well and locker fit perfectly under the deck beams. I also need to make accommodation for the support column that passes through the shot locker between the scuttles and against the well wall.well1.jpgwell2.jpgwell3.jpgwell4.jpg
 
Top