Donnie's HMS Blandford Cross Section Build: 1/32 Scale

Donnie

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This is now the official first opening remarks about my 1:32 build log of the Blandford. The first comment is that this is my first scratch build. I have been putting this off for a long time and now is the time. I also ordered the Blandford AOTS to help me with terminology.

First things first are getting the plans printed out. Since I have an HP 7740 Wide Format printer, this is at least one fortunate thing. Printing plans from pdf are not my forte'. However, a few adjustments needed to have the correct dimensions reflected correctly on the sheets.
I would like to expound on this if you do not mind. In the printer settings (advanced settings) there is a drop-down to choose between "Fit to Page" and "Actual Size". The default setting is "Fit to Page" and seems logical. I printed out a test page and from initial observation all is ok. But, closer inspection reveal that this is not the case. The first item to print was the Keel. One notch seems ok until I measured the full length and noticed a problem. Then I remembered the "Actual Size" selection from a long time ago dealing with the same situation. Printed the Keel again and it is now EXACT. I need to mention that the difference is NOT noticeable at first. the dimension difference is barely noticeable, but the dimensional error does add up. It is NOT the plans. It is the way the printer makes internal adjustments.
So, I include a small screenshot in case someone has this dilemma. Also, my basic printer dialog setting has "Tabloid" instead of the usual 11x17 settings. The tabloid is fine. Please take note that you might not have this problem. If you have a printing company doing this for you, mention "Actual Size". For those that already know this, then disregard as this is a new experience for me.

print-setups01.jpg
The next item that I felt was important was what method I was going to use to build the frames on. I must give credit to Norway (Knut) as I read his log on this. So, since my wife works at Hobby Lobby, I was able to get a 23 x 18 sheet of glass really cheap and it is 1/8 inches in thickness. I also grabbed a very thin transparency sheet. This one sheet is about $1.50 so, it is not major to buy more in case glues makes it messy.
I am not sure how this will work, but I think it will be ok. The glass serves as a strong flat surface. Then I lay my plan on the glass, then on top of the plans, I will lay my transparency sheet. The sheet is .030 inches, or 1/32", or .75mm in thickness. It seems so thin that I cannot tell the transparency sheet is there. Below are some samples of such:

transparency-sample01.jpg


Now this image below is just that the plans sheet static clinging to transparency. Kind of optical illusion.
It looks like the plans are on top, but the plan is underneath the transparency.

transparency-sample04.jpg

transparency-sample05.jpg

The wood selection: I have no experience here. I have always used "kit wood". I have contacted Dave at dlumberyard for some samples: Here is a list of samples. The (F) denotes all of the framing. The other woods are for (pillars, shot locker, pumps, etc.) is yet to be determined. My main concern, for now, is the framing selection. As you can tell, I am leaning towards a darker selection for framing. ONLY ONE (F) will be selected for framing. These are just choices. I am NOT mixing these.
  1. Alder (F)
  2. Basswood
  3. Boxwood
  4. Cherry (F)
  5. Dogwood
  6. Holly
  7. Hornbeam
  8. Madrone (F)
  9. Swiss Pear
  10. Walnut (F)
So, there it is, as I am off to a start and waiting for some wood samples. I have always been a kit builder so I hope that I have not overloaded myself.

Donald
 

Uwek

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Very good, that you will start the section POF - welcome to the club ;)
and it will be not so complicated and problematic for you, due to the fact, that you know very well how to handle timber.
Very good idea with the transparent sheet - I will give it a try also next time.
Me personally I would recommend pear, swiss pear or Elsbeere for the framing and other main structure - in my opinion it is looking better than the Cherry and for a section the price difference is only marginal...... They have very fine grain
But as often in life and also in modelling: It is a question of taste
 

DocBlake

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Glad to see you starting, Donnie! I chose a contrast between hull frames and deck framing with beech for the hull and Swiss pear for the deck framing. Boxwood and pear would look great also (stay tuned to my channel for a upcoming project like this ). Whatever your choice, it should be great fun! The Blandford group now has multiple builds either finished or close to it (Mike, Knut, SgtMike, Don Farr and me) so no shortage of help available. Once you build this model you’re an expert on it, LOL! Don’t hesitate to ask us questions.
 

DocBlake

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Donnie: one thing that is helpful when building frames is to have the first layer of futtocks fixed in place so they don’t move . It makes gluing the second layer much easier and ensures alignment. I use double sided Scotch tape for this. See my Blandford log for details.
 

Norway

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Donnie, I also used a transparent sheet, but during gluing I used double-sided Scotch tape
such as Dave.
I don't know if this is the best way to do it but I got it this way, picture in my log.
I'm also excited about how you check the drawings to find out if everything is in the right scale.
Greetings Knut-
 

Jimsky

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Hello Donnie. Looks like you are all prepared for all the challenges. Building from scratch should be a lot of fun. As for the wood selection, I echo Uwe's and Dave's preferences and choose Swishpear or boxwood for frames. With the age, under Oils, this timber looks amazing. Anyway, good luck. I will watch your log as it progresses.
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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The wood selection: I have no experience here. I have always used "kit wood". I have contacted Dave at dlumberyard for some samples: Here is a list of samples. The (F) denotes all of the framing. The other woods are for (pillars, shot locker, pumps, etc.) is yet to be determined. My main concern, for now, is the framing selection. As you can tell, I am leaning towards a darker selection for framing. ONLY ONE (F) will be selected for framing. These are just choices. I am NOT mixing these.

  1. Alder (F)
  2. Basswood
  3. Boxwood
  4. Cherry (F)
  5. Dogwood
  6. Holly
  7. Hornbeam
  8. Madrone (F)
  9. Swiss Pear
  10. Walnut (F)
So, there it is, as I am off to a start and waiting for some wood samples. I have always been a kit builder so I hope that I have not overloaded myself.

Donald


if you are leaning toward a darker wood for framing Alder would not work because it is a light blond color the Madrone is a pale pink color something like a light steamed pearwood. The two darker woods in your list is Cherry and Walnut.

keep in mind how you are going to build the model woods like Boxwood, dogwood hornbeam are really hard woods and do not work very well with hand tools they work much better machined. so if you are going to cut joinery by hand these woods are difficult to cut with a knife.

Madrone is another hard wood and tends to burn if your tooling is not very sharp.
 

DocBlake

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Donnie, I also used a transparent sheet, but during gluing I used double-sided Scotch tape
such as Dave.
I don't know if this is the best way to do it but I got it this way, picture in my log.
I'm also excited about how you check the drawings to find out if everything is in the right scale.
Greetings Knut-
I know that in his upcoming Ontario section group build, Mike41 is making sure there is a scale ruler included on every drawing, to avoid the sizing mistakes that might occur.
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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I would suggest the same type of wood for the framing,including all the deck framing
I agree with Zoltan

what I do is all the heavy timbering beams and frames as one wood, planking as another and then accent woods like caprails, wales, inside the bulwarks deck fittings, coamings, waterways

a bunch of samples are on the way, well packed up and ready to go

i took at look at Dave's build and there is some impressive joinery going on with the deck. If your going to do that by hand don't frustrate yourself with working with really hard woods. Mill work? that's no problem.
 

Mike41

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I agree with Zoltan and Dave,

By using the same wood for the beams and frames as Dave does, you create an integrated structure that flows together enhancing the overall design of the model. Using contrasting woods tends to break up the structural design into individual parts.

This model could be made completely from basswood stained and painted resulting in an attractive display piece. Since this is an introductory exercise you can use the other members to decide what to use and how to build it. Have fun, this is only a hobby.

Mike
 

Donnie

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Hi everyone,
First, thank you Dave for the samples and advice. It seems that Cherry or Walnut has become the top two to choose from. I have seen walnut in various shades too.

Thank you for the warm invites and encouragement /advice and all the things that fit in-between. Well, for some reason, I think my 'inbox' on my conversations must have got stuck from way yesterday early as for some bizarre reason, I did not know I had these responses until Zoltan pointed out to me - ""Hey Donnie, you need to catch up on your Blandford BL - you got people responding.""
So, I do not know what happened. I have heard of this happening before to other members and it might be that I have to respond again to my own post before I get notifications (??) oh well, I am here now. Interesting - only two notifs in my inbox and not related to this post !! Ha !!

I was then just busy with someone sending me some more images to post them in the CG (Contributors Gallery).

1. You all are correct with the framing all being of one type/color of the wood. I will do that. (again ignorance)
2. I do have a Mill (A Sherline Mill) but milling the beam structures can be tricky I think as the parts of quite complicated angles to put in a vise - I will see. I do have two special end mills that are called "Down-Cut End Mills. They work excellent-nice clean milling on wood. They are not like regular end mills that tear the wood. These are for wood.
3. A while back, I purchased some mini-chisel set from Micro-Mark. Since I have not had any projects, I need to get the set-out and try out the different chisels they have in the pack. I am not sure if these would be classified as being used for the joinery for the beams. I need to get that set back out.
4. Today, I need to finish printing out the plans to start studying them to get an overall understanding of things and how the parts will be made. Yes, I know I have all the other BL's that went before me and I have been reading them. Of all the reading I have done, somehow I missed the double-sided tape routine.

Thank you to all, and I look forward to sharing my experience.
Donald
 

NMBROOK

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Donnie it is great to see your about to return to the workbench and start making some sawdust.

Timber choice,at least to me is a very personal thing.I seldom advise on what to use from an aesthetic point of view.I very much do my own thing and generally don't care what anyone else thinks.If I think it works for me,then that is what matters after all.

I will however,advise on personal experience of working with timbers.Firstly yes you do have a mill but these cannot cut square blind mortices,some handtool intervention is necessary at some point.

I agree about Boxwood,I regularly use this,but to make a framed model out of the stuff is hard work.This stuff is like concrete and will dull cutting edges like there is no tomorrow.You are OK with the mill but when you have no option but to use hand tools in certain areas,you will know about it.

Walnut,my one concern with this is that it is a hard timber that can take a sharp edge but not very good at holding it.Small areas are prone to splitting and breaking off.Very frustrating when you spend hours working away on a small joint.

Swiss Pear,I know you have possibly dismissed this,but I was converted to this Timber when I started using it.There is a reason it is so popular with the POF building fraternity.It is obscenely easy to work with to the point of almost cheating.It cuts easily with a knife,it machines well,it bends easily,it holds an edge and it doesn't splinter unless you have an area with very figured grain.From a workability point of view,it is the best timber I have used.

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

DocBlake

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I agree, Nigel. The type of wood is very much a personal choice and not a question of right or wrong. In my Blandford build I used beech for the hull frames and swiss pear for the deck framing. The pear was a dream to work with and I love the contrast with the white holly decking as well as with the beech framing. Ship models built of the same wood used to construct the actual vessel would be rather boring, i think! Build your model the way you like!

Woods like walnut and mahogany tend to have an open grain and large pores and may be a problem at smaller scales. Yellow heart and blood wood are brittle and tend to splinter. Every wood has good and bad points, so "pick your poison!"
 

Donnie

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I agree that it is probably best to choose a wood that has good machinability and workability rather than the colors. I spent this evening working on the Jig. Mike says that the Jig does not have to be a work of art. The bottom is a pre-made 12"x36" shelf and 1/4" MDF 2x2 foot sheet. bought at home depot.
No, it is not glued up yet,. I just showing a dry fit.


jig01.jpg

jig02.jpg
 

DocBlake

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Good start, Donnie. The most critical step is coming up: transferring the keel position lines from the jig top to the base. The positioning of the keel is crucial. One way to do that is to cut the base the exact same size as the top. Then the supports will align at the corners and you can take measurements of the keel position off the top and simply transfer them to the bottom. ( I hope my explanation made sense,)
 

Uwek

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Good start, Donnie. The most critical step is coming up: transferring the keel position lines from the jig top to the base. The positioning of the keel is crucial. One way to do that is to cut the base the exact same size as the top. Then the supports will align at the corners and you can take measurements of the keel position off the top and simply transfer them to the bottom. ( I hope my explanation made sense,)
Or with a perpendicular or lead, like I do it normally - If you have one, it is in my opinion that fastest and most accurate possibility
IMG_17691.jpg
 
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