French cutter Le Cerf (1779-1780) - Scratch build 1:48 or just a DEER...

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001- модель1200х770.jpg

The La_Cerf's keel was laid in my shipyard in June 2014. In AutoCad I drew the bulkheads with steps in them for the clinker planking, which speeded up the planking with narrowing only in the bow and stern. To provide a larger area of adhesion, the spaces in the stern and the bow are filled with alder wood. First were planked the transom and the stern counter. I decided not to use paint, but to make all the details of artificially blackened hornbeam. Clinker planking is made of swiss pear. The carvings will be made from European boxwood. As this will be my first attempt at carving, I hope my deer will not look like a cow.

000-AutoCAD.jpg

I made the mistake of listening to the older generation of shipmodelers who argued that using the steps in the bulkheads will not let me lay the planking fairly. For this reason I cut the half-finished clinker planking (as it turned out, my method of planking was very strong - barely managed to remove the strakes) and completely filled the spaces between the frames with alder. Following the advice given me, I also cut off the notches for the planking strakes from the bulkheads. Now, in order to glue one strake of planking, it was necessary to use a bracing timber to clamp the plank and prevent it from slipping. Because of this planking became a very slow process. No more than one strake a day could be made, as I had to wait for it to dry completely. Also, the gluing area has decreased, because each board no longer lay flat against the bulkhead, but only a narrow edge bore upon it and on the previous strake. Only in the bow and stern, where the clinker planks lie flat on the frames, did they have enough surface for the glue. My experience convinced me that that the first variant is stronger and more reliable. I ought to have followed through with my original plan and learn from my own mistakes, instead of listening to the advice of the older generation, which does not have experience of AutoCad and laser-cutting.

065-здираю обшивку.jpg

087-кіль.jpg

At the same time began to work on the keel, the stem and the sternpost. For these I again used Asutrian (pink) pear and blackened hornbeam. I am using a table saw for this, though, of course, this could be done with AutoCad drawings for laser cutting. However, the laser doess not give a 100% perpendicular cut and for this reason I decided to make the details by hand. Besides, this proved to be a very interesting process of fitting the scarphs and faying the pieces together. At this stage work on the model was interrupted in January 2017, as I was commissioned to build a large model on a tight schedule.

104-обшивка-15й ряд.jpg

After a break of more than 3 years:
Work on the model was renewed in March 2020. This stage of the work on La Cerf is already being carried out in a new country, in a new workshop. The work will follow a new methodology and will tell about it in the proper order. At last I completed the clinker planking and replaced the walnut gunport frames with pear, as the grain of the walnut did not match well with the pear. I used a soldering iron to remove the old pieces and glued in new frames. The pear I used was kiln-dried with oak and had obtained yellow-brown color. The cills will be installed after the completion of the outside planking.

121-формування_корми.jpg

Then began building the transom with the help of a frying pan, which had the right radius for bending the planks. For the construction, I used soft poplar and built a support structure which will hold the transom in the right position until the completion of planking. I have begun mounting the wales and clean the planking from glue remains and fairing the surfaces for attaching the stem and sternposts. The wales are made of hornbeam, a hard, but workable material that acceptable bending characteristics. During the long interruption in construction, the transition to the new place, a few pieces of the stern post and the blank for the stem were lost. I have now run out of Austrian pear and am looking for new sources of swiss pear here....

128-бархоути.jpg


More details and photos you can find on this model's personal page:
 
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Jimsky

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Here you go, Olga. Many thanks for starting this very interesting project. I will follow your build log and already waiting for the next set of images of the progress. The question I have is:
The pear I used was kiln-dried with oak and had obtained yellow-brown color.
Do you dry the wood yourself or you had a facility? What exactly the process to dry Pear alone with Oak? Many thanks for the answer. :)
 
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Do you dry the wood yourself or you had a facility? What exactly the process to dry Pear alone with Oak? Many thanks for the answer. :)
This is my friend in Ukraine one summer he worked at a sawmill and he knew that I was building from a pear. So he offered me a wild pear (and he dried it with the bulk of the wood - it was oak) - of course it was interesting to me and now I have some stock of this wood!
 
Joined
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View attachment 146462

The La_Cerf's keel was laid in my shipyard in June 2014. In AutoCad I drew the bulkheads with steps in them for the clinker planking, which speeded up the planking with narrowing only in the bow and stern. To provide a larger area of adhesion, the spaces in the stern and the bow are filled with alder wood. First were planked the transom and the stern counter. I decided not to use paint, but to make all the details of artificially blackened hornbeam. Clinker planking is made of swiss pear. The carvings will be made from European boxwood. As this will be my first attempt at carving, I hope my deer will not look like a cow.

View attachment 146463

I made the mistake of listening to the older generation of shipmodelers who argued that using the steps in the bulkheads will not let me lay the planking fairly. For this reason I cut the half-finished clinker planking (as it turned out, my method of planking was very strong - barely managed to remove the strakes) and completely filled the spaces between the frames with alder. Following the advice given me, I also cut off the notches for the planking strakes from the bulkheads. Now, in order to glue one strake of planking, it was necessary to use a bracing timber to clamp the plank and prevent it from slipping. Because of this planking became a very slow process. No more than one strake a day could be made, as I had to wait for it to dry completely. Also, the gluing area has decreased, because each board no longer lay flat against the bulkhead, but only a narrow edge bore upon it and on the previous strake. Only in the bow and stern, where the clinker planks lie flat on the frames, did they have enough surface for the glue. My experience convinced me that that the first variant is stronger and more reliable. I ought to have followed through with my original plan and learn from my own mistakes, instead of listening to the advice of the older generation, which does not have experience of AutoCad and laser-cutting.

View attachment 146464

View attachment 146465

At the same time began to work on the keel, the stem and the sternpost. For these I again used Asutrian (pink) pear and blackened hornbeam. I am using a table saw for this, though, of course, this could be done with AutoCad drawings for laser cutting. However, the laser doess not give a 100% perpendicular cut and for this reason I decided to make the details by hand. Besides, this proved to be a very interesting process of fitting the scarphs and faying the pieces together. At this stage work on the model was interrupted in January 2017, as I was commissioned to build a large model on a tight schedule.

View attachment 146466

After a break of more than 3 years:
Work on the model was renewed in March 2020. This stage of the work on La Cerf is already being carried out in a new country, in a new workshop. The work will follow a new methodology and will tell about it in the proper order. At last I completed the clinker planking and replaced the walnut gunport frames with pear, as the grain of the walnut did not match well with the pear. I used a soldering iron to remove the old pieces and glued in new frames. The pear I used was kiln-dried with oak and had obtained yellow-brown color. The cills will be installed after the completion of the outside planking.

View attachment 146469

Then began building the transom with the help of a frying pan, which had the right radius for bending the planks. For the construction, I used soft poplar and built a support structure which will hold the transom in the right position until the completion of planking. I have begun mounting the wales and clean the planking from glue remains and fairing the surfaces for attaching the stem and sternposts. The wales are made of hornbeam, a hard, but workable material that acceptable bending characteristics. During the long interruption in construction, the transition to the new place, a few pieces of the stern post and the blank for the stem were lost. I have now run out of Austrian pear and am looking for new sources of swiss pear here....

View attachment 146470


More details and photos you can find on this model's personal page:
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
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Same problem. The lower strakes are drilled and wired/glued, there isn't any glue on the strakes themselves. This worked fine until I got past the deadwood and the additional twisting and bending needed firmer fixing as I progressed. It's working to an extent though I'm not satisfied. Also, of course, it would have been a lot of sweat and effort to notch all the beech frames being POF. I'm having a break for a while and doing a straightforward POB or 3!

clinker.jpg
 
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
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Location
New London (Connecticut)
Same problem. The lower strakes are drilled and wired/glued, there isn't any glue on the strakes themselves. This worked fine until I got past the deadwood and the additional twisting and bending needed firmer fixing as I progressed. It's working to an extent though I'm not satisfied. Also, of course, it would have been a lot of sweat and effort to notch all the beech frames being POF. I'm having a break for a while and doing a straightforward POB or 3!

How I understand you! I have already completed this process. I additionally poured glue along the overlap of each plank to increase strength - hopefully the boards will not fall apart over time)))
 
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How I understand you! I have already completed this process. I additionally poured glue along the overlap of each plank to increase strength - hopefully the boards will not fall apart over time)))
If you're using wood glue it will be pretty secure, but you could 'belt and braces' with treenails (rather you than me!) Nice work, love the ships boat.
 

Uwek

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I just made a Look Inside and Review of the Monograph made by Jean Boudriot and Hubert Berti

If you are interested, please take a look here:

 

Kkonrath

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I really like the details in the ships boat, a master mini model in itself.

Post photos of the boat build if you have any please.
 
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