HIGH HOPES, WILD MEN AND THE DEVIL’S JAW - Willem Barentsz Kolderstok 1:50

Heinrich

Staff member
Bluenose Moderator
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
7,175
Points
738

And as I write the answer to Johan, I thought of something. On the 1595 expedition (the Second Voyage) the only ship without a name was the 20 last Jacht of Rotterdam. But ... they supply a reason for that: The ship was only to have been commissioned on a later date which was when it would officially receive its name. What if the two ships that Barentsz and Rijp used during the Third Expedition had not yet been commissioned - something which made sense if Amsterdam wanted to keep it low-keyed; pending the outcome of course. Then the ships would have been officially nameless ...
 
Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Messages
175
Points
103

Location
The Netherlands
And as I write the answer to Johan, I thought of something. On the 1595 expedition (the Second Voyage) the only ship without a name was the 20 last Jacht of Rotterdam. But ... they supply a reason for that: The ship was only to have been commissioned on a later date which was when it would officially receive its name. What if the two ships that Barentsz and Rijp used during the Third Expedition had not yet been commissioned - something which made sense if Amsterdam wanted to keep it low-keyed; pending the outcome of course. Then the ships would have been officially nameless ...
It is a pitty you will never get confirmation of that Heinrich Cautious
 
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
1,789
Points
488

Johan did you see how Bontekoe's story started? In the year of our Lord xxx he sailed on the ship Nieuw Hoorn ..... Why can't they all be like that and have the name/s of ship/s in the first sentence??? :)
Yep, I read it and I just love how this story begins.
It would at least helped you tremendously with your endeavors to solve the mystery of Willem Barentsz' ship. On the other hand, look at how much you/we learned. I'd say it's an added bonus.
 

Heinrich

Staff member
Bluenose Moderator
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
7,175
Points
738

Yep, I read it and I just love how this story begins.
It would at least helped you tremendously with your endeavors to solve the mystery of Willem Barentsz' ship. On the other hand, look at how much you/we learned. I'd say it's an added bonus.
Yes but from now on the first criterium in a future build is: "Does it have a name?" ROTF
 

Heinrich

Staff member
Bluenose Moderator
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
7,175
Points
738

Vic at least the Flying Dutchman is still sailing or "ghosting". ROTF What is left of the WB, is now residing in a museum in St. Petersburg. I wonder why so many of us choose ships to model that have been shipwrecked or destroyed in some way or another. Maybe we should change the forum to Wrecks of Scale! :)
 

Heinrich

Staff member
Bluenose Moderator
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
7,175
Points
738

Part of my research also included the painting on the front cover of the book "Het Schip van Barents" by Ab Hoving. This proved to be a little gem which I thought I would share with you. The full article is published on: https://www.hetscheepvaartmuseum.nl/collectie/artikelen/666/ontdek-het-grootste-schilderij

The painting is entitled The Battle of Gibraltar and was painted by Cornelis Claesz. Van Wieringen (1622). 'Battle of Gibraltar' is the largest painting in the collection of the National Maritime Museum. With its five meters width and just over two meters height, it is a showpiece with a special story.

a0724_M_combi_0 - 副本.jpg

A Heavy Spanish Defeat

On April 25, 1607, some thirty Dutch warships attacked the Spanish fleet anchored in the bay of Gibraltar. Twelve Spanish ships went down and thousands of passengers were killed or drowned. Despite the fact that the battle was convincingly won by the Dutch, the Dutch admiral Jacob van Heemskerck suffered a shot in his leg. The defeat during this naval battle was so great that the Spaniards opted for an armistice. Ironically, while van Wieringen was busy putting the finishing touches to this painting, the war had unfortunately already resumed.

A representation of reality?

Contrary to reality, van Wieringen added a detail to the painting. In the middle of the scene a yacht is depicted which has never actually sailed there, nor did it participate in the battle. This yacht is depicted for propaganda. On the back of the ship, Van Wieringen has depicted the princely coat of arms next to the coat of arms of Amsterdam and the logo of the Admiralty.

811.jpg

The non-existent ship. Depicted for propaganda with the princely coat of arms, the coat of arms of Amsterdam and the logos of the Admiralty of Amsterdam.

Prominently to the right of the center is the flagship of the Zeeland vice-admiral Laurens Jacobsz Alteras: the Red Lion depicted. (Close-up below)

a0724_M_combi_0.jpg

Around the side railings of the spiegel, Van Wieringen has left his name in the woodwork.

815.jpg

On the bow of the 'self-invented sloop', a man is fanatically attempting to retrieve a flag - that is obviously of great importance to him - from the water. It is widely assumed that it refers to the Dutch flag.

813.jpg

Seeing that the painting was a gift for Prince Maurits (later Prince of Orange), it was important for the client that all this was portrayed despite the fact that the reality was different. Warfare was a psychological game: it was Van Heemskerck's wish to humiliate the Spaniards in their own waters.

He rewarded the sailor who climbed into the mast with 50 silver 'reals of eights'. Unfortunately, the story ends fatefully for Van Heemskerck: he dies after the battle from the shot in his leg. He was the first naval hero to receive a grave in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam at the expense of the Dutch state.

Van Wieringen was 2nd choice

The first choice for the maker of the desired painting went to Hendrik Cornelisz. - the founder of European marine art. Vroom though, asked for an exorbitant amount and the negotiations broke down. The Admiralty turned to Van Wieringen and asked him to make a test piece. Prince Maurits was satisfied. Van Wieringen then made a 'modello' (or miniature painting). With this he had to show in small format what the final composition of 'The battle of Gibraltar on 25 April 1607' would look like. This was to the satisfaction of all and Van Wieringen was commissioned. It would be his best work ever, fetching the highest price for a sea piece by Van Wieringen.

Water and air ultimately determined the atmosphere

Van Wieringen was not a spectator of this naval battle. The composition of this composition was done on the basis of eyewitnesses, board journals and maps. The rock of Gibraltar can be seen vaguely in the background on the right side of the painting as a geographical landmark. In the foreground, the water is deep green and further back the water becomes blue-gray and light blue. Van Wieringen did this to give depth to the performance. The chaos on the small boats, the wreckage and the drowning people contribute to the violent scene that is depicted.
 
Joined
May 8, 2021
Messages
1,854
Points
538

Location
Cape Town South Africa
Vic at least the Flying Dutchman is still sailing or "ghosting". ROTF What is left of the WB, is now residing in a museum in St. Petersburg. I wonder why so many of us choose ships to model that have been shipwrecked or destroyed in some way or another. Maybe we should change the forum to Wrecks of Scale! :)
Stunning pub in Amsterdam called the Flying Dutchman- interior is like a quarter deck of a ship- fun too.;)
 

Heinrich

Staff member
Bluenose Moderator
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
7,175
Points
738

I was riding up the west coast of SA and Namibia on my off road bike last year and I am sure I saw in the mist What looked like a “ghost Flying Dutchman “....Johann you have to believe...ROTFROTFROTFROTF;)
Johan wouldn't know that, but we do! South African fishermen, until today, swear it is the truth! ROTF
 
Top