HMS Kingfisher/ King's Fisher - Tedboat

Uwek

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YES - many thanks for re-posting these images - and I remember, that I asked you about the stove - kit content or scratch? - and you mentioned that it was scratch built, or?
Looking really good - it is / was a high quality kit - built by a high quality modeler
 
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Hi Uwe,
The kit did contain styrene sheet and tube to build the stove, but as I mentioned before, I'm not happy about using plastic in a model of this type.
So I built the stove from scratch using timber, brass tube and rod.
I don't think it came out too bad!
And thanks for the kind comment!
 
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Hi All,
A few more photos to be going on with:

IMG_7011a.jpg

Port side left almost totally unplanked but showing the ribbands that would hold the frames in place while the hull was planked.
Also shows the rudder hung.


IMG_7026.JPG

Masking up on the gun and sweep ports with Tamiya masking tape. You can see why!


IMG_7030a.jpg

And the result when the tape is removed and any minor marks removed. The planking is boxwood, with a couple of coats of sanding sealer, so paint marks will easily scrape off.


IMG_7068.JPG

The captain's cabin, with stern lockers and the trunking for the rudder stock.


IMG_7095.JPG

Breasthooks on the gundeck. The vertical bars frame the hawse holes. At sea the hawse holes would be blocked by timbers inserted and wedged behind the bars, while at anchor the hawser would have split timbers wedged in the same way.
Also shown is the channel to hold the manger timbers, which formed a low barrier serving two purposes - One to contain any water that did get through the hawse holes at sea, and the other to form a pen to contain any animals they might have on board.
Yed - I know one of the bolts is off-centre!!!


IMG_7563.JPG

The hull has various 'rails' running fore and aft. These have to follow the sheer of the ship, and the lower one is interrupted by nearly all of the gunports.
It would be almost impossible to achieve a smooth line using short lengths of rail between the gunports, so I initially ran the timber straight over the ports, glued and treenailed it at every second frame, and then cut out the lengths where it crossed the ports.

That's your lot for tonight!

Ted
 
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A bit more - head rails and quarter badges.
Sorry about the long period since my last post - mastering this new computer of mine -very pleased with it¬

IMG_7585.JPG

The upper and lower cheeks for the bows. Takes quite a bit of time and effort to get these right, but very necessary as the whole of the bow structure depends on them being correct, and they are very prominent when you look at the ship!

IMG_7621.JPG

In position on the bow - the apparent 'kink' in the lower cheek is actually an optical illusion caused by the way everything works around this point.


IMG_7630.JPG

The trick is to get them level on each side!


IMG_7615.JPG

The upper cheeks support head timbers, (the odd shapes in the middle), which in turn hold the main rail (pictured) and the lower rail.


IMG_7657.JPG

All the rails in place, including the rearwards extension of the lower rail, supporting the cathead beam. Known as the 'eking rail'. The blue paint is the start of the frieze, as I realized I was not going to be able to paint this area once all the rails were in!


IMG_7659.JPG

There are a series of gratings between the main rails, which provide access to the bowsprit for the crew. The two pedestals are the 'seats of ease' for the crew.
It must have been awful sitting there in any sort of a sea, but they are the only toilet facilities on board for the crew!


IMG_7642.JPG


IMG_7645.JPG

Back to the blunt end, and the quarter badge - just a question of building up each piece . Windows glazed with microscope slide cover glass.


IMG_7676.JPG

Stern windows in position


IMG_7699.JPG

Timbers prepared for the Planksheer rail. To be absolutely correct, certain of the ships frames should project above the rail, and be carved to form the bitts.
That would be a very tricky job, as the rail would have to be cut out to slide down all the bitts together. So I took the easier option, cut of the frames at planksheer level. and then inserted short pieces through the holes to replicate the bitts - you'd never know the difference, but now I've gone and told you all anyway!IMG_7729.JPG

See what I mean? Also shows the frieze painted, and the fore channels going in.

I think I'll leave it there for the moment - time to go and watch the news, and see what our useless government is doing about Brexit!

Ted
 

Maarten

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A bit more - head rails and quarter badges.
Sorry about the long period since my last post - mastering this new computer of mine -very pleased with it¬

View attachment 112048

The upper and lower cheeks for the bows. Takes quite a bit of time and effort to get these right, but very necessary as the whole of the bow structure depends on them being correct, and they are very prominent when you look at the ship!

View attachment 112054

In position on the bow - the apparent 'kink' in the lower cheek is actually an optical illusion caused by the way everything works around this point.


View attachment 112050

The trick is to get them level on each side!


View attachment 112055

The upper cheeks support head timbers, (the odd shapes in the middle), which in turn hold the main rail (pictured) and the lower rail.


View attachment 112069

All the rails in place, including the rearwards extension of the lower rail, supporting the cathead beam. Known as the 'eking rail'. The blue paint is the start of the frieze, as I realized I was not going to be able to paint this area once all the rails were in!


View attachment 112070

There are a series of gratings between the main rails, which provide access to the bowsprit for the crew. The two pedestals are the 'seats of ease' for the crew.
It must have been awful sitting there in any sort of a sea, but they are the only toilet facilities on board for the crew!


View attachment 112071


View attachment 112073

Back to the blunt end, and the quarter badge - just a question of building up each piece . Windows glazed with microscope slide cover glass.


View attachment 112074

Stern windows in position


View attachment 112075

Timbers prepared for the Planksheer rail. To be absolutely correct, certain of the ships frames should project above the rail, and be carved to form the bitts.
That would be a very tricky job, as the rail would have to be cut out to slide down all the bitts together. So I took the easier option, cut of the frames at planksheer level. and then inserted short pieces through the holes to replicate the bitts - you'd never know the difference, but now I've gone and told you all anyway!View attachment 112076

See what I mean? Also shows the frieze painted, and the fore channels going in.

I think I'll leave it there for the moment - time to go and watch the news, and see what our useless government is doing about Brexit!

Ted
Hi Ted,

From the otherside of the Northsea fully agree with tour last sentence, politicsSpeechless seems to be about deviding people at the moment.
Luckely here on SOS it is about the opposite, sharing good ideas and great builds.
Your build is a great one and I am curious about how you created the fantastic paintings on the frieze, it seems you have an excellent depht in it created with schades in a darker color. How did you realize this on that small scale.
 
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Just an aside.
As there seem to be a few people interested in this model, which, unfortunately, is no longer in production, could Bob Hunt at Lauck Street Shipyard not be approached to make a few for those interested?
I appreciate that the cost would be much more than the kits available from other sources, but surely, the beauty of this model outways the cost.
Just a thought. :)
 
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