HMS Ontario 1780 Cross Section scale 1:32

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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I’m not sure why gunports on a weather deck had lids in the first place.

Dave ,Mike is talking about the little window on the gunport lid,not the gunport lid

I was actually responding to Dave about gunport lids being on weather decks

Read my post #132 in this topic.....clearly written, that at one decker there were no additional small doors, ventilation scuttles....

I see Uwek's point no need for ventilation on an open deck
 

Mike41

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I’m not sure why gunports on a weather deck had lids in the first place.

Dave ,Mike is talking about the little window on the gunport lid,not the gunport lid

I was actually responding to Dave about gunport lids being on weather decks

Read my post #132 in this topic.....clearly written, that at one decker there were no additional small doors, ventilation scuttles....

I see Uwek's point no need for ventilation on an open deck
I will replace the little door detail with a note asserting ‘No additional small doors, ventilation scuttles ... are to be added to the gun port covers to avoid confusion and an imperfection in the model. The model will still have gun port covers.
 

ziled68

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Hello Mike,
I just stumbled on your build log and like everyone else I too will be following you. I have always loved cross sections and have always wanted one. I did get the opportunity to build the Triton (albeit, I did make some changes to it). When I came aboard on SOS and realized that they had the Blandford well what can you say, they had me line, hook, and sinker. Once I get back home I will go ahead and build her along with Ontario when the plans become available. Since the Triton was built at 1:48, then all other cross sections will follow suit so as to have size comparisons from one ship to the next. The following ships are what I am referring to;

Rattlesnake's beam at 1:48 equals 5 19/32"
Ontario's beam at 1:48 equals 6 1/4"--------------once plans are available
Blandford's beam at 1:48 equals 6 19/32"---------once I get back home
Triton's beam at 1:48 equals 8 13/32"-------------all ready built
Leopard's beam at 1:48 equals 10 5/8"
Constitution's beam at 1:48 equals 10 7/8"
Victory's beam at 1:48 equals 12 31/32"

I realize that this is a lot of work but I am quite fond of cross sections so these vessels will be a labor of love.

Raymond
 

ziled68

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Hello everyone,
While I was on the web and searching for information, I accidently stumbled upon information as to the small little windows on the gun lid. These little windows are know as illuminators in order to provide light to the inside of the ship. The following photo will show you what I mean followed by more information of the illuminator. Illumiator.jpg

Lenses were first installed in decks in the early nineteenth century (Quinn 95ff). I prefer to reserve the term for optical elements with a curved side for more efficiently collecting or distributing light.

The first one was the Pellatt “Illuminator” (1807), known also as the “Patent-Light” or “Bull’s Eye Light.” Dana, in Two Years Before the Mast (1841), mentions that the forecastle (crew quarters) of the merchant vessel Alert is “tolerably well lighted by bull’s eyes” in the daytime. The Pellatt lenses were used, not only as decklights, but also as portals and in gunports.

In its original form, it was a lens with a hemispheric top and a flat bottom, five or six inches in diameter and one or two inches thick (centerline), placed in a wood frame (later, a brass or copper collar). Since the convex side was on top (and protruded above the deck), this was a collector lens. The frame could be hinged for ventilation purposes.

By 1818, it was sometimes installed in an inverted configuration, i.e., flat side flush with the deck, and convex side down, arguably making it a “distributor” lens.

However, this didn’t seem to be considered a big advantage because “double flat” lens (I’d call them flush skylights) were sometimes installed (e.g., on the Confederate submarine Hunley.) A problem with a flush flat glass surface was that it was very slippery when wet, and some ships had textured or roughened deck lenses to improve traction.

Prisms. There was less leakage if a deck fixture fit into a single plank. A square or rectangular lens of plank width transmitted more light than a circular lens of the same width. And rather than give them a curved surface, they could be faceted. The faceted side could face up or down, more often the latter.

Mirrors. In theory, mirrors could be used to redirect light from a window to another part of the interior of the ship.

Raymond
 

Mike41

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Hi Raymond,
I think you will enjoy building the Blandford, I simplified the plans some to make it easier for the first-time scratch builders, but you are welcome to add extra details as many members of the group build are doing. The holidays have put the prototype of the Ontario on hold for a while, she will be getting more attention after the first of next year.
Mike
 

Mike41

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Hi Dave,
I just got back to Olathe from Albuquerque last night and will be here a week of so before returning to Myrtle Beach to work on the prototype. Your name is at the top of Donnie’s list when I get the drawings finished.
The aft magazine should keep you busy for a while, it was one of Jeff’s better ideas.
Mike
 

Mike41

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Gun Port Covers:
The exterior of the covers is made from yellow hart to match the exterior planking and the interior is blood wood. I used some copper foil for the hinges, but they didn’t look very good, I made another set from ebony and decided to use them instead of the copper. The exterior is attached to the lining with glue and 20 gauge brass bolts as shown in the photos. By using a pattern for the gun ring bolts the rigging will be consistent. I added some cleats for the lines that open the port lids and installed the lids on the port side in the closed position. The starboard lids will be installed in the open position after the upper deck is installed.

IMG_2235.JPG IMG_2236.JPG IMG_2237.JPG IMG_2285.JPG IMG_2287.JPG IMG_2288.JPG IMG_2289.JPG IMG_2290.JPG IMG_2291.JPG
 

Mike41

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Hi Dave,
The holidays delayed work on the Ontario, but I am making some progress now. I have a Proxxon MF 70 mill with a compound table and if you can use a router the mill will be easy to use. The dials on the table are calibrated in millimeters which is nice to work with.
 

donfarr

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Me TOO for the Ontario X section, though my skills do not match most of these GREAT MODELERS ON THIS SITE, Dave I am pretty sure you saw the EXCELLENT THREAD BY JOE(epicdoom) on milling as I am planning to learn how to use milling for ship modeling, what I got was the MILLING VICE FROM HARBOR FREIGHT, AND AN XY TABLE FROM AMOZON, plan to use the table on my dremell work station for now until I learn how to use it, lots of goddies to spend money on like clamps, parralles, cutters etc, etc. Don
 
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