• "Annual SOS Donation Drive Underway"
    Please consider making a Donation to SOS to support our growth and developement.
    https://www.paypal.me/DonateSOS
    Please check and read your email subject [Donations] from sosforums@shipsofscale.com for more details.

HMS Saint Albans (1764) - 64-guns - scale 1:72 - scratch built by Peter Bauer

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,579
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria
Herewith I want to present you a beautiful built by a good friend of mine, Peter Bauer, in a short building log.

It is the
HMS Saint Albans / St. Albans (1764) - 64-guns
a POB scratch built in scale 1:72


Here you can find my short report of our last modelers meeting in Vienna, when I could see the model in his actual status


IMG_3345.JPG

IMG_3351.JPG

In near future I will show here you some working steps, in order to catch up with the actual status of the model.

But first of all we want to present some information about the real ship ...... to be continued .....
 

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,579
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria
from wikipedia about her History and career

HMS St Albans was a 64-gun St. Albans-class third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 12 September 1764 at Blackwall Yard, London. She served in the American War of Independence from 1777 and was part of the fleet that captured St Lucia and won victories at Battle of St. Kitts and The Saintes. She was converted to a floating battery in 1803 and was broken up in 1814.

Unbenannt.JPG Unbenannt2.JPG

Career
Captain Richard Onslow took command of St Albans on 31 October 1776. He took a convoy to New York City in April 1777 and joined Lord Howe in time for the repulse of d'Estaing on 22 July 1777 at Sandy Hook. Onslow sailed for the West Indies on 4 November 1778 with Commodore Hotham, and took part in the capture of Saint Lucia and its defense against d'Estaing that December at the Cul-de-Sac. In August 1779, he brought a convoy from St Kitts to Spithead.

On 10 December 1780, St Albans, in company with Vestal, Monsieur, Portland and Solebay captured the Comtess de Buzancois.

Captain Charles Inglis took command of St Albans in November 1780. On 13 March 1781 he sailed in with Vice-Admiral George Darby's fleet to the relief of Gibraltar. He was with Admiral Robert Digby's squadron later that year, before being sent to the Leeward Islands to join Sir Samuel Hood at Barbados.

St Albans was with Hood during the Battle of Saint Kitts, when Hood attempted to relieve the island and repulsed several attacks by the Comte de Grasse on 25 and 26 January 1782. Inglis was again in action with the French on 9 April, when Hood's fleet clashed with de Grasse's in the Dominica Channel, and fought at the Battle of the Saintes on 12 April, where the main British fleet under Inglis's old captain, now Admiral Sir George Rodney, decisively defeated de Grasse. St Albans had six men wounded during this engagement.

St Albans sailed to North America in late July 1782 with Rodney's successor, Admiral Hugh Pigot. She was back in the West Indies by November, where Inglis was given command of a squadron of four ships cruising independently there. The squadron, consisting of St Albans, the 64-gun Prudent, the 74-gun Magnificent and the sloop HMS Barbados, was sent from Gros Islet Bay on 12 February to investigate reports of a French squadron, consisting of Triton, Amphion and several frigates, having sailed from Martinique.

On 15 February 1783 the 74-gun Magnificent, under Captain Robert Linzee. was on a cruise in company with Prudent and St Albans. Magnificent sighted a strange sail and gave chase. She was close enough to identify the mysterious ship as a frigate by 18:00, and by 20:00 as darkness fell the quarry opened fire on her pursuer with her stern guns. Magnificent overhauled the French ship by 21:15, and after fifteen minutes forced her to strike her colours. Magnificent took possession of Concorde, of 36 guns and 300 men under the command of M. le Chevalier du Clesmaur. Shortly after surrendering, Concorde's maintopsail caught fire, forcing the crew to cut away the mainmast to extinguish it. Prudent and St Albans came up two hours later and Magnificent towed Concorde to St. John's, Antigua.

On 26 November 1794 she rescued the crew of HMS Actif which had developed leaks and was foundering.

St Albans and HMS Porcupine (1777) shared in the capture on 8 November of the brig Molly.

Fate
From 1803, St Albans was used as a floating battery. She was broken up in 1814.

sistership
director paint.jpg
original art: drawing over etched outline. In the centre the dark bulk of Admiral de Winter's totally dismasted 'Vryheid', at the Battle of Camperdown on 11 October 1797, masks the 64-gun 'Director' of Captain William Bligh, which both ships engaged starboard to starboard broadside. To the right Admiral Duncan's flagship 'Venerable' is in the middle distance in starboard-quarter view after having engaged 'Vryheid' for three hours and lost her main topmast. Duncan's blue admiral's flag is shown nailed to the stump, as was famously done when the rest was shot away by one of his men, Jack Crawford of Sunderland. Ships are also scattered across the more distant background. After damage to 'Venerable' caused her to sheer off, 'Vryheid' engaged with 'Triumph', 'Ardent' and 'Director' until all her masts fell over the side and disabled her starboard guns: she then dropped out of the line as an ungovernable hulk and struck her colours, which brought an end to the battle. 'Director' evidently claimed the honour of firing the last broadside into her as shown by Owen's MS inscription on this image which is an original watercolour but one worked up over a basic etched outline of the foreground ships and 'Venerable' to the right. PAG8958 is another copy, though with only part of the same inscription, in which both the sky and the distant shipping beyond are different and in watercolour only. From this it appears that Owen supplied them to order, using a base stock of the plates but each being a more or less similar replica version. The inscription on this example reads: 'This plate of His Majesty's Ship DIRECTOR firing her last broadside to which / the Vreyhied [sic] struck is humbly inscribed to Capn. Wm. Bligh, Officers &c by their most / obedient and very humble servant Saml. Owen. Drawn etched & Pubd. by S. Owen No. 144 Strand April 1798.' The original drawing, in freehand watercolour, was one of a set of three the Owen appears to have done for Bligh in 1798 and which were exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1799. All three were acquired by the Museum from Bligh's descendants in December 2018 and are numbered ZBA8790-ZBA8792. This item replicates the last of these. [PvdM 11/16, updated 12/18]



The St Albans-class ships of the line were a class of three 64-gun third rates, designed for the Royal Navy by Sir Thomas Slade.

Unbenannt3.JPG Unbenannt4.JPG

Design
Slade based the St Albans draught on that of his earlier 74-gun Bellona-class.

Ships
Builder: Perry, Blackwall Yard, London
Ordered: 13 January 1761
Launched: 12 September 1764
Fate: Broken up, 1814
Builder: Wells and Stanton, Rotherhithe
Ordered: 13 January 1761
Launched: 24 October 1763
Fate: Burned, 1777
Builder: Clevely, Gravesend
Ordered: 2 August 1780
Launched: 9 March 1784
Fate: Broken up, 1801


Some more detailed events with dates of the HMS Saint Albans and her sisterships you can find on Threedecks




 

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,579
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,579
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria
Here I want to show you the first steps of installation of the false-keel and the bulkheads

the false keel installed on the stabilization jig, which is used only in the beginning of the hull construction - in the background one of the NMM-drawings
DSC02271.JPG

to secure the false-keel and keeping the false keel straight, a temporary bearing was necessary
DSC02272.JPG

DSC02273.JPG

installed bulkheads, stabilized - the bulkheads are prolonged in upwards direction, in order to get a consistent base for the hull planking works Upside-down
also the works for the stem structure is started
DSC02275.JPG

to be continued ......
 

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,579
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria
Today I can show you the finished hull with the installed 1.st planking layer of the HMS Saint Albans - sanded to have a good smooth basis for the final second layer

DSC02286.JPG

DSC02284.JPG

DSC02288.JPG

DSC02289.JPG

Many Thanks for your interest - to be continued ......
 
Top