HMS Victory cross section (De'Agostini)

Galley Slave

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#1
I thought I would like to share with you guys my very first attempt at doing a wooden model - well any model really.
I have been at it for the last three weeks, and am really enjoying it.
There have been a few mishaps along the way.
I glued the 8th frame in the wrong way round and a few of the planks slipped overnight. (useless pegs!!)
Both issues corrected with only the occasional incorrect language used.
The following pic is where I stand at the moment.
Busy planking the sides with the pumphouse cabin next on the list.

IMG_5547.JPG
 

Peglegreg

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#3
G'day Tony
I so glad that you have decided to show us your build.
It looks like a very interesting and well detailed kit that you are doing.
Those hick-ups you mentioned can and still happens to us all. The main thing is that you're enjoying your build and this amazing hobby.
I'll be taking up some of the front row watching your build.
 

Peglegreg

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#5
G'day Tony
You can now sand the hull very lightly, but you can't paint or varnish/oil it until the Wales are put on and the treenails on the unpainted areas have been done. Before using paint and the varnish/oil/etc rub down the hull with 120 grit sandpaper, then 200 grit and finally 400 grit sand paper. After the first coat of the finish you are using, rub down the hull with a light sanding of 400 grit sandpaper. Then wipe the whole surface with a methylated spirit to wash away all the dust.. then do the second coat and repeat the sandpaper and finally the final coat. Make each coat thin and it has to be diluted with water/turns/etc.
If you got some bubble wrap you could tape it to the outside to protect it from scratches while you work on the inside.
How are you gu oing to mount the finishe model when its completed? Maybe it's a good time to make a mount/stand for you model.
Just a thought
 

Peglegreg

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#7
G'day Tony
Here's a link to an easy method of treenailing by a fellow member who is a true master modelshipwright.
Click HERE to go to his log.
 

Galley Slave

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#10
Too kind Donnie. Thank you.
However I have come across a bad error in my build.
Apparently the first three planks either side of the keel should have been 2mm thick and I used 1.5mm in my excitement to start building.
Just glanced at the insructions instead of reading them carefully.
I now sit with a dilemma.
I either have to replace the three offending planks either side of the keel, or reshape all eight of the riders.
Reshaping of the riders may make them too low to fit under the beam supports correctly.
I suppose I just need to resign myself to a quick (he says hopefully) repair.
 

Peglegreg

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#14
G'day Tony
Standard white PVA is one of the easiest glue to dissolve. Some people thinks soaking in water is the best, but I think using methylated spirits is even better. You can use either in a spray bottle and keep on spraying and using a flat thin blade GENTLY pull them apart. I cant emphasized GENTLY enough. After the part is separated wash it very good to get rid of the stickiness. This is why metho is better than water because the glue comes off in lumps while water it resolves completely.
Good luck memattie.
 

Jimsky

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#15
Ok, then you can take of the planks by using iron. Pre-heat the iron. Wet the plank\s with water and put on top the plank you want to remove. DON't keep it on a single spot, move it alone the plank. Work on a small spot. Then try to pry (easy) the plank while still heating. If it doesn't come off dump it with water again. Repeat the steps until it will come off.
 

Peglegreg

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#17
Another solution that you could do is to get 0.5mm venee timber the dame colour as the plank and glue it on to make 2.00mm thickness.
I assume the you are taking about the inner planking not the outer.
20181231_092945.jpg
Are you referring to the floor rider?
20181231_094405.jpg

If you are, the veneer method would be your easiest solution.
Hope this helps mate
 

Donnie

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#19
I was thinking the same just add .5 mm to the planks already. That’s the nice thing about wood. Even if it is not exact, if you plan to paint or stain. I assume these thicker planks are the Wales.
 

Donnie

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#20
Well. The veneer is too thin I think. He needs to find .5 mm strips. Just my opinion.
So after thinking about it the so called veneer is usually 1/64 inch in imperial which makes since it’s just that I never refer to such as veneer. Usually on a double planked ship the second planking is about.5 mm or so. My bad.
 
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