International Maritime Museum Hamburg IMM - Germany - 14 posts

Uwek

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The International ship modelling days in Hamburg in mid of September were held in the location of the Maritime museum.
I had not much time to see everything in the museum, but in the following posts I want to show you as much as possible!
Definitely it is absolutely worth for a visit (or two)

From the web-page of the Museum:

3000 Years of Maritime History and Modern Research
The International Maritime Museum is housed in the heritage listed building, Kaispeicher B. Three thousand years worth of maritime history are displayed on nine ‘decks’ with precious exhibits, model ships and paintings. There is an entire deck dedicated to marine research.


At the beginning there was the ocean. Humans stood at the shore, ready to sail unto new horizons. From there the journey through three thousand years of seafaring history begins. Historical documents and sea charts reveal how the modern world-view has developed. Particularly valuable: a copy of the „Atlantis Majoris“ from 1657, the first nautical atlas printed in the Netherlands.

Hand painted crown compasses and shining, golden sextants lead into an era in which a keen eye and steady hand were required to determine the course. A „signal station“ with Teletype machinery and signal codes demonstrates how seafarers communicated up until the twentieth century.

Selected models show various strands of development in shipping: from Phoenician galley and Roman trireme to Viking dragon boats, from cog ships of the Hanseatic period and the explorer’s caravels to the last of the windjammers.


Since the stone ages to modern day, shipbuilding has mirrored the technological possibilities of each era. The first form of the boat was the ‘dug-out’. A tree trunk, thousands of years old, hollowed out with the simplest of tools that was pulled from the Elbe near Geesthacht, is the oldest piece on display in the museum. It was only centuries later that shipbuilders planned their work based on blueprints and scale models. The block-model of an English ship from 1650 and sketches out of William Keltridge’s manuscript, „His Book“ from 1675 are two of the oldest documents and reminders of this era.

Medals and uniforms from navies around the world, displays of commercial and passenger shipping, as well as works by well-known maritime painters, are presented on other decks and the treasury holds ship models made of ivory, amber, silver and gold.


An entire deck is reserved for marine research. The exhibit was developed in collaboration with leading scientific institutions and is constantly updated. Research instruments, samples from the sea bed, films that diving robots have taken of the deep sea, an actual wall of ice and fascinating underwater audio samples deliver a vivid impression of the seas. We still know too little about the oceans, the efforts of marine.

The building and entrance

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In front of the entrance are located two historic 24-pdr guns of the HMS Foudroyant, commissioned in 1798, which was flagship of Lord Nelson between 1799 and 1801.
 

Uwek

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The International Maritime Museum Hamburg shows the worldwide largest collection of POW Bone Ship Models on deck 8 of its exhibitions. This magnificent, over 200 years old artworks are the crown of any maritime collection. They are as beautiful as the history behind them is facinating. Our colleague Manfred Stein, renown expert on bone ship models, takes you all for a tour in the exhibition and shares his knowledge on this masterpieces from the time of the Napoleonic wars.

 

Uwek

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A Model of the french 40 gun Le Francois, launched 1688 in scale 1:16 18
  • François 52 guns (designed and built by Étienne Salicon, launched 20 December 1687 at Le Havre) – classed as 4th Rank with 40 guns in 1688, then raised to 52 guns in 1691 and reclassed as 3rd Rank; broken up 1736.

What do you want to tell us here?
The shown model in the museum is in scale 1:16
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Perhaps this is a small typo, I myself have an education in musology and I know how it sometimes happens. The author of the model himself reported a scale of 1/18. In the end, this is not too important, I just wanted to give information about the construction of this model.
 

Uwek

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Perhaps this is a small typo, I myself have an education in musology and I know how it sometimes happens. The author of the model himself reported a scale of 1/18. In the end, this is not too important, I just wanted to give information about the construction of this model.
Sorry, now I understand the link to the building log of the model
the nickname Cherkassy is the modeler Y. Vladimirovich
and Yes, he mentioned in his log from the year 2013 the scale with 1:18

In the year 2017 the model was part of an auction with an Est: £20,000 - £30,000 - I do not know what was the result. I guess, that the Museum won the auction and added the model in the exhibition.


The description there was:

Description: 1/16IN.:1FT SCALE, modelled as in authentic practice in pear and black hornbeam by Y. Vladimirovich to 17th Century drawings by François Colom adapted by Jean Claude Le Mineur, the fully-framed hull pierced with gunports and finely carved cockerel figurehead supported by pierced scrolls, carved cathead supports, gratings, anchors with wooden stocks, moulded top-deck guns in carriages with Royal Arms, fully-fitted ship's boat with cross boards, thwarts and oars lashed to chock mounts, ebonised capstan, belfry, poop deck with livestock cage, stern cabins and quarter lights, mounted on wooden cradles on green baise-lined case with wood-bound plexi-glass cover and name plates. Cased measurements - 32 x 96 x 25in. (81.5 x 244 x 63.5cm.) Le François was designed and built by Étienne Salicon at Le Havre between 1687-88. She measured 125½ft x 33ft x 15ft (in French units of measurements - the pre-metric French pieds equalling 32.484 cm. so 6.575% greater than British feet). She was manned by 280 men plus six officers and was initially rated as a 4th Rank ship of 40 guns but was raised to the 3rd Rank from 1691 with 50 guns, being pierced for eleven pairs of lower deck guns and twelve pairs of upper deck guns. She remained at this Rank until c.1713 when she was reduced to 4th Rank again. The François took part in the Battles of Bantry Bay (11th May 1689) and Beachy Head (10th July 1690). From 1694 to 1695 she was one of a number of the King's ships 'lent' to René Duguay-Trouin for privateering under the armament mixte arrangements whereby Louis XIV participated financially in privateering ventures using French naval vessels. In Duguay-Trouin's hands she took part in the capture of H.M.S. Nonsuch (40) and H.M.S. Boston (32) on 4 January 1695. She was 'lent' again between 1695-96 for another armament mixte arrangement (this time under the Marquis de Nesmond), and took part in the capture of H.M.S. Hope (70) on 16 April 1695 before being returned to official French naval service where she remained until 1735, being broken at Rochefort in 1736. Charles Miller Ltd is grateful to Rif Winfield for his assistance with this lot. , Literature: Winfield, R. & Roberts, S.: French Warships in the Age of Sail 1626-1786, Seaforth Publishing. This model will be available for viewing at Imperial Road

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BTW: The model was based on this planset



Many Thanks for the additional information - very interesting how such a model came to the exhibition
 
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