Le Coureur 1776, CAF model by Sisco

Joined
Sep 22, 2020
Messages
199
Points
203

I love the rope walk! I was thinking about building one myself at some point as you can make rope from high quality German textiles that don't shrink or expand with humidity. It also avoids having to constantly re-order and wait for additional rope.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
103
Points
133

Location
Milano
Nothing special to add to what already so well presented by Uwek if not that In the ammunition compartment I preferred to use similar canvas packets that seem more realistic to me than the solution proposed by Caf model (white painted wooden rod)
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
18,323
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Your parts are looking very good, especially also the powder bags in the powder room - very good progress my friend

I see, that you changed the layout of the deck 13 over the ammunition compartment (mirrored along the ship axis.
So you have to change also the small wall at the ammunition room by 180° - the small light has to be on the side and not directly under the hatch
 
Joined
May 15, 2020
Messages
753
Points
353

Location
Roskilde Denmark
Well, I'm actually a little surprised about these powder bags. Do you think the powder would stored in the magazine in 'charge bags'? Let me underline that I have absolutely no knowledge at all about this so the following is mostly based on logical reasoning. The ammunition magazine was placed under the waterline, I guess so it could be quickly flooded in case of fire and so it would not be hit so easily by cannon balls. I would think black powder packed in felt or any other kind of textile would be impossible to keep dry. I thought the powder would be stored in some kind of watertight containers. Either small barrels made of wood or cylindrical kegs made of very thick and hard leather. Then it should be packed into charge bags and brought to the deck only immediately before engagement with an enemy.
Do you guys have some knowledge how it actually was?
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
103
Points
133

Location
Milano
Well, I'm actually a little surprised about these powder bags. Do you think the powder would stored in the magazine in 'charge bags'? Let me underline that I have absolutely no knowledge at all about this so the following is mostly based on logical reasoning. The ammunition magazine was placed under the waterline, I guess so it could be quickly flooded in case of fire and so it would not be hit so easily by cannon balls. I would think black powder packed in felt or any other kind of textile would be impossible to keep dry. I thought the powder would be stored in some kind of watertight containers. Either small barrels made of wood or cylindrical kegs made of very thick and hard leather. Then it should be packed into charge bags and brought to the deck only immediately before engagement with an enemy.
Do you guys have some knowledge how it actually was?
Hi Poul.
I don't have such in-depth knowledge, I admit.
I just thought that a white painted wooden rod of 2 mm as proposed by Caf was even less realistic.
Two millimeters on a scale of 1/48 is less than 10 centimeters. In the abstract, I too would have thought that a barrel would be the most common solution to store powder . But I have never seen a 10 cm barrel and so I imagined it was something else
In any case, oilcloth was commonly used wherever a certain impermeability was required and this has been mi modest thought .
In any case they are just dry fit in and if someone enlightens me with some more precise information, it costs me nothing to remove them and put something else or not put anything at all.
Thank you for your comment
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
103
Points
133

Location
Milano
I found in this study ( https://www.marina.difesa.it/media-...ttino/Documents/2011/dicembre/santarini.pdfof ) on 16th-century Venetian artillery which I summarize as follows ...
"the introduction of cartocci (of canvas, paper or parchment) in the use of naval artillery began to spread during the Thirty Years' War by King Gustav but there are also previous cases in Venice starting from 1600

L‟introduzione in uso dei “cartocci”, ovvero dei contenitori preconfezionati (di tela, pergamena o cartone) per le cariche di lancio di polvere nera, è generalmente attribuita al re di Svezia Gustavo Adolfo, che li avrebbe adottati per il suo esercito durante la Guerra dei Trent‟anni (Periodo Svedese 1630÷1635). (55) Tuttavia si ritiene probabile che il normale impiego degli scartozzi per le artiglierie venete abbia avuto luogo sin dai primi anni del „600. Sull‟argomento si riportano i seguenti brani del gen. Pietro Sardi Romano, [vedasi rispettivamente i riferimenti bibliografici (1-2) p. 27 e (1-1) p. 98]:
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
103
Points
133

Location
Milano
Lo scartoccio altro non è che un sacchetto di tela fitta, quale con arte e con ragione tagliato, può capire [ovvero contenere] tanta quantità di polvere quanto deve essere la carica propria di quel tal pezzo, al quale haverà da servire et empito viene [ovvero risulta] tanto grosso di circonferenza che facilmente entrare dentro la canna del pezzo … Questi tali scartocci, così giustamente empiti e cuciti, quando si vogliono mettere dentro la pezza, se gli fa in croce un buon taglio, giusto in quella parte che deve venire sotto il focone; appresso collo stivatore si calca e con l‟aguccia si va per il focone bene innescando, acciò sia sicuro che la prenda fuoco. Questi scartocci sono molto spediti e facile e più presto assai si caricano i pezzi e con manco errore e quando non si avesse comodità di tele, o per risparmiare, si potriano fare di cartone mediocremente grosso in collato molto bene in luogo di cucitura …

i can' t translate it in english .. Google doesn' t work with ancient venitian !!! .. I too have some problems . But resuming it is somethiong like this..


The cartocci were made mainly of canvas and, in the absence or to save in the cheaper cardboard and at the time of insertion in the barrel a cross cut was made to facilitate contact with the trigger
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
103
Points
133

Location
Milano
little progress on Le Coureur
I was very busy in a major reorganization of my atelier ... of the equipment
I just freed it from the building jig
there is a great cleaning job waiting for me now
the ribs still have traces of char here and there because I preferred to leave a minimum margin of tolerance for the planking
 
Top