Miss Morris

shipbuilder

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
805
Points
298

Location
Great Britain
They were used for heavy cargo right up to WWII. The square sails were to help push the ship's head across the wind when changing tack in coastal waters where searoom may have been restricted. There were thousands of them in the 19th and 20th centuries.
 

Pathfinder65

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Messages
754
Points
343

Location
Maine, USA
They were used for heavy cargo right up to WWII. The square sails were to help push the ship's head across the wind when changing tack in coastal waters where searoom may have been restricted. There were thousands of them in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Thank you for the reply. Another bit of Maritime knowledge gained.
 

rwiederrich

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
291
Points
128

A top sail schooner would be my choice of vessel today...if I could own a vessel. Less crew, less space......but plenty of adventure.

Rob(Super drawing)
 

shipbuilder

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
805
Points
298

Location
Great Britain
Jim,
I am OK thanks! :D The problem at this time of year is the awful weather, I decided to get the display case and base built because I have to do a lot of the work outside, and want it complete before really bad weather comes in. It has been pourng down wirth rain practically every day for the past two weeks. Last week, we had two sunny days, but both freezing cold. Working outside with fingers like bunches of bananas is not much fun, but I have now got the outside work over with. When I return to the model, I will be up to my normal speed again!:) It is pitch dark at 1630 gmt at the moment. In summer, it is light until past 2130gmt, and I feel more inclined to get moving in brighter warm weather! This is how keen I was a few years ago - working in the snow, but I have got past that sort of thing now!:)
Bob


4 Bench in snow (Large).JPG
 
Last edited:

shipbuilder

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
805
Points
298

Location
Great Britain
I have now spray painted the sea with grey matt primer (automobile body spray) and then given it a quick dusting of white matt spray just to give it a bit of contrast for the photograph. The final sea painting will be either dark blue or greenish blue. I have screwed it temporarily in the base. The hull has also been fitted temporarily. A hole was drilled through the hole under the main hatch, and through the base. The underside of this hole was recessed with a large wood cutting bit. The photograph showing the underneath of the base identifies the screws and holes. The six screws labelled "A" go into the wedge edging round the sea base, to back up the glue. The four labelled "B" are holding the sea in place. The holes labelled "C" are just holes and used to assist in the removal of the sea base to facilitate painting it out of the base. A screwdriver may be pushed into the holes to work the sea out, as it is a close fit in the base. "D" is where the hull securing bolt comes through into the recess. The hull will finally be held in position with a single nut over a washer. I am now free to concentrate on fitting out the hull, and the masting and rigging. Also more work on the display case between times.
Bob

27 (Large).JPG28 (Large).JPG30 Underneath labelled (Large).jpg
 
Top