Model Shipways Bluenose, 1/64 scale by Hightflight

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Jul 13, 2020
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Moncton NB Canada
It was now time to secure the rest of the standing rigging. After the three jib stays were in place I worked my way aft by securing first the pullback stay then the spring stay followed by the main topmast stay. Continuing aft with the topping lift and the quarter lift on port and starboard. Next was the flying back stays which needed to reflect the ship on a starboard tack. I needed to slack the port one which would allow me to move the main gaff to port. I really wanted to delay the installation of the 20 deadeyes in order to give me better access to the inside of the deck. I continued with the throat halyards followed by the peak halyards. At this stage, I installed some deck details, rope hanks, coils of rope and two boat hook poles. I am still having some difficulty making decent rope hanks which kept falling apart on me. This is something I will need to work on a bit more. I use a plank bender in order to melt the beeswax into the rigging line.

Melting Beeswax.jpgBoat hook.jpgLazy jacks.jpgNavigation light.jpg
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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Final update:
I had previously installed the upper rat lines before I stepped the main and fore mast. It was now time to complete the lower deadeyes. A note here, I had decided to include both the port and starboard dory tackle which meant I needed to include a means of attaching the upper portion which is lashed to shrouds. I used zip sizing which needed to be included on the shrouds before attaching the deadeyes. The sheer poles were installed followed by the lower ratlines. I decided to use a jig in order to complete this task which made the job a little easier and I was able to space the ratlines evenly. Unfortunately, this does not give the ratlines that little sag which in my opinion looks more appealing. All that was left to do was to make and install the dory tackles and the navigation lights. It was time to secure the ship inside the case I had previously completed along with the letter opener I made from a piece of wood from the Bluenose II.
Deadeyes.jpgRat line Jig1.jpgRatline Jig 2.jpgRat lines 1.jpg


It is now July 31, 2020 and I have finally completed my Bluenose build after 714 hours and a total of 182 days of work. This will be my last and final update on this build. I have learned so much in the building of a model ship and thoroughly enjoyed the build. I have now decided to build my second ship, the HMS Pegasus from 1776 by Amati.

Here are some pictures of the completed Bluenose model

Model 1.jpgModel 2.jpgModel 3.jpgModel 4.jpgModel 5.jpgModel 6.jpgModel 7.jpgModel 8.jpgModel 9.jpgModel 11.jpgModel 12.jpgModel 13.jpgBow with star.jpgPort side.jpgRudder.jpgStern.jpgName plaque.jpg37 Dime.jpgBluenose on Mantel.jpgIn case 1.jpgIn Case lights.jpg
I want to thank all of you who have taken the time to read this log and who have commented on my Bluenose build. Your comments along with your encouragement have made this all possible.
 
Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
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Location
Moncton NB Canada
A word of caution here don't do what I did. I realized only after the sails were installed that I needed to use some wire in order to achieve the full wind look. I inserted a thin wire on the port side of the sail in order to help keep the shape. This would be so much easier to complete before installing the sails while they are flat on a work bench. I used silkspan as I indicate in the build log. The wire is then glued with the help of wood glue and a thin piece of the same material used to produce the sails. When you paint the silkspan with your tinted acrylic paint make sure you have some extra pieces left. You can notice I have even installed a couple of patches on the main topsail. Hope this helps.
 
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A word of caution here don't do what I did. I realized only after the sails were installed that I needed to use some wire in order to achieve the full wind look. I inserted a thin wire on the port side of the sail in order to help keep the shape. This would be so much easier to complete before installing the sails while they are flat on a work bench. I used silkspan as I indicate in the build log. The wire is then glued with the help of wood glue and a thin piece of the same material used to produce the sails. When you paint the silkspan with your tinted acrylic paint make sure you have some extra pieces left. You can notice I have even installed a couple of patches on the main topsail. Hope this helps.
I also saw a YouTube use of silkspan but it involved coating it with a paint substance, ironing, and letting the final remoistened cloth dry over a mold for the sail shape. A lot of work when we have multiple sails of different shapes and presentations. PT-2
 
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Hi Marc
first of all , HAPPY BIRTHDAY Birthday-Cake, sorry about the delay
it's a beautiful model
 
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Yes I followed the directions given by Tom Lauria in his Youtube video. This works well.
When I was behind the tide and had my somewhat wrinkled sails bent onto the masts and booms on a schooner rig as well as stepped and rigging underway, I got a spray bottle of fabric stiffener from Hobby Lobby. Spraying it onto the fabric and then gently smoothing and shaping the sail gave it a fairly fast and improved appearance that I was/am after. I'll try this a few more times as it didn't do any visible damage to the rest of the build. PT-2
 
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