Model shipways Privateer Rattlesnake 1:64 POB by MOG

nandoyoni

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MANY THANKS
They will be of great help to me, the problem that I have is that they are not the plans of construction in Spanish, so any help comes to me well, thanks for everything, if you had more information it would be great .... a pleasure and very HAPPY YEAR 2019
 

MOG

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Awhile ago I was advised by a completed Rattlesnake builder that the rigging plans did not clearly show all the termination points for lines on the fore mast. As it sometimes happens when scratch building parts you must be a little creative. In this case the fore deck railing was made from different timber than the kit provided which meant the railing & posts were slightly thicker. This in turn put the anchor tye down on the last rail post. I had to make very small kevels for the lower lifts. And place them on the fore deck to except the lift lines. This makes a total of 4 extra kevels that had to be added to handle the extra lines. 2 fore. 2 mizzen mast.


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nandoyoni

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Cool
I would like to be able to put the plans that I bought here, but it gives me an error when attaching them, if you could show me the transom and the bowsprit would be very helpful ... thanks
 

MOG

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nandoyoni, not a expert but I would guess a full sheet of plans are to big for forums, the moderators should let you know. plus every plan is a bit different in the detail they provide honestly I can read them and follow them but I'm not the one to advise on a good or bad set of plans. My bowsprit is on page 1, I can put up picks of the transom area. However I need to ask are you building yet or just in the planning stage?? if your just planning your build the bowsprit & transom are a long way ahead. Everyone builds differently, the Rattlesnake regardless of manufacturer has areas that are very tight on working space and has to be worked a step at a time or you will wind up with a mess, I know this from personnel experience, I had to go back several times to rework mainly because I attempted to work to far ahead. Again its your build but for the Snake I would keep it a simple thought process Keel, bulkheads, hull. ect… just my thoughts
 

nandoyoni

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Hello
Now I am finishing the HMS Bounty and I hope to start the Rastersnake HMS when I finish this, for the moment I am informing myself, since it will be my first project from just blueprints, the problem is that the plans are not in Spanish so any help is great
Thank you
 
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MOG

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Just a few pics to update the work. However, they also fit nicely in to a recent site discussion about rigging Rigging: Covers all Standing and Running. As you can see the Rattlesnake is a mass of lines with many belaying points in tight areas. Therefore, I think rigging as much as possible off ship works. If I had to do over again, I would highlight the line and its belaying point on the plan sheet, making any notes that would help the process in the future. Of course, with all stages there are draw backs in my case with so many lines it was a challenge to trace all lines to the proper termination point. Working inside out is a must so you don’t cross or foul the lines. A slow light hand and allot of patients is the key, my off-ship rigging was done well over a year ago, a few of the line ties had loosened & pulled away when tracing them, reattaching with sort lengths in very tight spots was a pain. The sites rigging discussion covered many great ideas all of which work in their own right. I will add from my own experience of coiling and taping the lines , the tape no matter if its low tack like masking or builders over time it will weld tougher, the coiled lines will stay in the coiled shape, I struggled pulling the tape apart, and had to rewax the lines to get them to straighten out the process requires tugging and pulling on the lines again the light hand approach not to cause damage is a major factor. In the end it all works out as for my build All in all I think its starting to take shape.
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shipahoy

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nice work on your rattlesnake . im in the process of painting the hull and bulwarks, but find that even with multiple sanding and filling the inexpensive basswood planking that model shipways supplies still looks rough. Its too late now but if i build another i would double plank the hull with some thin strips left over from other builds to get a nicer and smoother finish
 

MOG

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Thanks for the words. Do you have a build log? And how far along are you as not to go back?? For me I always double plank, for one as you said most kit supplied wood will not give you the type of hull finish you want. If your going with a second planking, it allows you some wood/error forgiveness as you can get relatively nice shape, and you don’t have to worry too much about a few minor flaws as your going to cover it up anyway. I use the same timber supplier for most of my wood, I do not paint preferring the natural look or staining to bring out the wood effect. For a second hull planking I use .05mm strips, I soak the strips then attach with glue and heat for a smooth looking effect. the hull pics on page one show hull with kit wood, then hull with second planking of dark walnut.
 

shipahoy

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after using some artist moulding paste i was able to smooth it out to a more acceptable finish. as with you, i have always built my ships with double planking and finished them with just a coat of varnish or satin urethane,followed by a coat of matte urethane to give it some depth. the only exeption up till the rattlesnake was the terror x occre that was painted matte black and tallow as per the look of the original ship. m.s. recommends in the instructions to paint the entire ship including inner bulwarks and deck but i think i will stain those and varnish them. still trying to figure out how to download pictures to this site.
 

MOG

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Your right about the modelling paste. I used allot, then sanded allot to get the first planking into a decent shape. Paint or stain it’s always the builders call on what they want their build to reflect. When it comes to following the historical paint schemes or following the painting instructions in a kit, I don’t really use them. for me it’s all about the wood, the effect I’m trying to achieve, bringing out the natural look by using different types wood I think gives a build a certain character. Of course I would never disrespect or embarrass the name of a ship Ok my style is not for everyone, It’s fair to say I rise a few eyebrows among traditionalist crowd. I respect the results the great builders produce. Its just the way I build. I say if it fits what you want stain and varnish. Also as you are finding the MS instructions are not very good, I worked mainly of the plan sheets. I Look forward to seeing your build log. There’s plenty of advise on how to download your pictures on the site.
 

MOG

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Trial & error one of the best parts of building . working the coiled lines on the shroud cleats for the Fore mast. On the Mizzen & Main lower shrouds I added the cleats and coiled lines After rigging the deadeyes, in the end it worked out ok BUT it was a real pain working inside out getting the cleat to hold, then attempting to get the coiled line on the cleat. The tight space along with the fragile nature of the cleat attached to the shroud at this scale caused several issues with pulling the cleat off the shroud, then if the shroud held, I pulled the line off the cleat. So, plan B for the Fore shrouds I’m attaching the coiled line to the cleat first, then attaching it to the shroud line after I have rigged the upper deadeye to the shroud. I found I got much better control on the loose shroud line and was able to get the cleat set in a good please on the shroud. Of course, the rigging of the deadeyes will twist the shroud a little but the cleats and line look ok, with allot less pain.
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