Outboard Boat, Motor and Trailer (Small Boats)

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I found a 3D file for an Evinrude outboard motor online that I liked and thought I could use in a build. I finally got one printed that I liked and turned my attention to a suitable boat. I found “Chessy” on Svenson’s Free Boat Plans. As I was completing the build I started thinking about a display cradle for it and thought that the traditional cradle was not suitable and started searching for a boat trailer. I found a 3D printable boat trailer and decided it would work with some modifications.

I did not want to just build the boat to be just any old outboard boat. I had built rowboats for fishing, hunting and crabbing and liked the idea of a theme for the project similar to those.
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I decided to build it with a recreational shrimping theme. South Carolina allows recreational shrimpers to bait for shrimp for approximately three months every year. Each shrimper is allowed 10 bait stations during a shrimping trip, which are marked by PVC poles. Shrimpers are allowed to catch a 48-quart cooler full of shrimp a day. Recreational shrimpers use inshore areas because it offers them both shallow areas to cast their nets, and protection from any breezy conditions. The bait used is a mixture of fish meal and clay and stinks like crazy. I shrimped with my father for many years until he was in his nineties. It was great fun and we normally had shrimp to last the winter.

Here is how the project turned out. I know it is not a big majestic ship as some of you build but it was great fun and didn’t take me a year to complete. Additionally, I worked on other boats as I was building it. Yes a nice fill in project.

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Inside the boat are three 5 gallon cans, two used to contain the bait and the third one holds the cast net. There is an anchor that is used to anchor out while making runs to the baited area. Two milk jugs that contain frozen ice, a cooler to keep the shrimp in, and the ten poles are also in the boat. The 5 gallon cans, anchor, milk jugs, cooler, outboard motor and trailer were 3D printed. The gas can is made from wood. The wood for the boat is pine.

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Joined
Oct 19, 2018
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Pawley's Island, SC
Thanks Donnie. I enjoyed using the 3D printer to help in the build. It's amazing how much is out there that can be used in model ship building.
 

Donnie

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Pawley,
I could put these in the CG if the images were a little larger.
 
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That is so cool Pawley. What scale is that? Could you send me outboard files please? That would be useful when I start one of my old Jinx build, it's a 1/5.2 scale RC electric outboard.
 
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Very cool. I built a Midwest skiff kit. It reminded me a lot of the little Michigan rowboats I helped build with my grandfather. He lived on a lake. So, I built a three of them from scratch, using the same techniques we used (as I remember). We used reclaimed lumber and built the boats based on the materials we had at hand.





One duplicates a plywood hull, one with clinker built or lapstrake hull, (overlapped edges), one with a carvel built (lapped (edge to edge, sometimes rabbeted), hull. The little fishing boats had flat bottoms with a false keel. The bottom boards were sometimes from stem to stern, sometimes from side to side, depending an the material we had available. The seams were filled with (Oh my gosh), white lead paste. (Maybe that's why I'm a bit nuts) and were painted with lead based enamel paints. The yearly repair of the paintwork was part of the job the grandkids all had when we went "up to the lake" for a few weeks in the summer. They could be fitted with an outboard motor. We used old window sash weights for anchors when necessary, and the old flat coffee cans for worms. The green trim and oar color was the "official" color for our lake home. Each home or cottage used a different paint scheme so you could always tell who was out on the lake just by the colors on the boats.
Everything on these models was scratch built.
Those summer days "helping" grandpa left fond memories, and building these little boats brought them all back.
I was never able to source an outboard motor though in 1/12 (1" = 1' scale. Your motor really looks cool.

EJ
 
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Joined
Jan 18, 2020
Messages
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Location
Roseville, Michigan USA
Those boats are great. I have on the bench a pile of wood to make a model of a small dinghy I hope to make this summer. It is similar to this one. The plans are from Whisstock.com, an 8 ft clinker pram. The picture of the wood pile is the white pine I plan to use for the planking.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2018
Messages
107
Points
113

Location
Pawley's Island, SC
Joined
Oct 19, 2018
Messages
107
Points
113

Location
Pawley's Island, SC
Very cool. I built a Midwest skiff kit. It reminded me a lot of the little Michigan rowboats I helped build with my grandfather. He lived on a lake. So, I built a three of them from scratch, using the same techniques we used (as I remember). We used reclaimed lumber and built the boats based on the materials we had at hand.





One duplicates a plywood hull, one with clinker built or lapstrake hull, (overlapped edges), one with a carvel built (lapped (edge to edge, sometimes rabbeted), hull. The little fishing boats had flat bottoms with a false keel. The bottom boards were sometimes from stem to stern, sometimes from side to side, depending an the material we had available. The seams were filled with (Oh my gosh), white lead paste. (Maybe that's why I'm a bit nuts) and were painted with lead based enamel paints. The yearly repair of the paintwork was part of the job the grandkids all had when we went "up to the lake" for a few weeks in the summer. They could be fitted with an outboard motor. We used old window sash weights for anchors when necessary, and the old flat coffee cans for worms. The green trim and oar color was the "official" color for our lake home. Each home or cottage used a different paint scheme so you could always tell who was out on the lake just by the colors on the boats.
Everything on these models was scratch built.
Those summer days "helping" grandpa left fond memories, and building these little boats brought them all back.
I was never able to source an outboard motor though in 1/12 (1" = 1' scale. Your motor really looks cool.

EJ
I like your work and the way you use accessories to add to the build. I went thru what I call "My Row Boat Period." I built row boats lie crazy. I did the Midwest Dingy and nice little model. The one pictured is one I built out of "heart of pine" from the Midwest plans.


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This one was painted.
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I made a few of the "White Duck" from Sevsons:
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I also made a few Dories:
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As I said I went through a "Row Boat Period." but they are great fun to make and can look really good especially with a few accessories and even some weathering:

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Thanks for your comments.
Pawley
 
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