Potosi - German five-masted barque

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I have just begun drawing up plans of the German five master Potosi. This vessel was completed by J C Tecklenberg, Geesmunde, in 1895. With a gross tonnage of 4,026 tons, she had a length of 366.3 feet and a beam of 49.7 feet. She was interned in Valparaiso for the duration of World War I. In 1918, she was handed over to the French, who sold her to Chile in 1923. She was lost by fire two years later under the name Flora.
So far, I have drawn the profile and the five masts. The fifth mast, the jigger, is completed. The name of the masts from forward to aft are: Fore, Main, Middle, Mizzen and Jigger.
Models of the Potosi are few and far between, because of the belief that the rigging is too complicated. This is not so - it is repetitive, but not complicated, as each of the four square-rigged masts are practically identical. The deck layout is fairly simple, and there is a minimum of decoration on the hull.
I am drawing this as a simple stress-free activity whilst convalescing from rather complicated eye surgery on the 3rd of this month.
Potosi 1 (Medium).JPG
 

Uwek

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The Potosi was a really interesting barque, especially because she was stronger designed because of her usual journeys around Cape Horn between Germany and Chile.

Potosi_on_the_way_to_Chile_-_SLV_H99.220-4029.jpg


I am looking forward to see your drawing finished
 

Uwek

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The Potosi was a really interesting barque, especially because she was stronger designed because of her usual journeys around Cape Horn between Germany and Chile.

View attachment 113080

I am looking forward to see your drawing finished
 

Uwek

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The Potosi was a really interesting barque, especially because she was stronger designed because of her usual journeys around Cape Horn between Germany and Chile.

View attachment 113080

I am looking forward to see your drawing finished
 

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Thanks Uwe. All the Flying P sailing ships were well-built, and I believe that they never lost a single one due to bad weather, despite being mainly on the Cape Horn run. This afternoon, I pencilled in the jibs and staysails, and completed rigging the mizzen mast. Only three more to go!:)
Potosi 3 mizzen mast (Large).JPG
 

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The total number of officers and crew for the Potosi, was 44 men. The ship could carry 6,400 tons of cargo, and with good weather conditions attain a speed of 19 knots. But the voyage speed average was pulled down by the long spells of calm between the trade winds. Sail plan coloured in with the computer -
Bob
Potosi 3 mizzen mast (Large) - Coloured.JPG
 

Uwek

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Thanks Uwe. All the Flying P sailing ships were well-built, and I believe that they never lost a single one due to bad weather, despite being mainly on the Cape Horn run. This afternoon, I pencilled in the jibs and staysails, and completed rigging the mizzen mast. Only three more to go!:)
View attachment 113081
You forgot one well known Flying P-Liner!
The Pamir was lost in storm, exactly today at the 21.st September 1957

 

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The Pamir was not a Flying P when she was lost, and was over fifty years old, and long past her prime. She was only a Flying P between 1905 and 1931. I remember the shock of the loss even though I was only 13 at the time!
Bob
 

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I forgot the lifts on the fore upper topsail, upper t'gallant and royal yard. I have now added them. They are the curved lines hanging below the yards that support them when the sails are furled and the yards lowered.
 

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Beautiful. A very professional, clean drawing...I'm more then impressed.

Rob
 

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Thanks - It was just a personal challenge more than anything else. I started it three days after major eye surgery, and it took three weeks, as I had to limit the time spent on it or it would begin to get painful. They said that I was OK to draw plans, as it didn't require any physical effort. I am very pleased with it!
Robert
 
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