Rope making jigs and other small tools

Moxis

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I made my own using the parts I had in my scrapbox: 10 mm plywood, a few gears and some old toy gearmotor. The unit can be used either manually or motorized, operating with a foot switch. Small clamp can be attached into other end to make short block strops.
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epicdoom

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Moxis That's a nice looking rig Brother. I have a 3D printer and been thinking about Printing some gears to build a serving machine.
 

Moxis

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Thanks epicdoom! Yes, it is a good practize to print the gears with a 3d printer. Which CAD program are you using? I have also thought a lot to start learning 3D design, it could be a great help when building models.
 

epicdoom

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I'm using SketchUp and Tinker Cad I have the XYZ Da Vinci 1.0 Printer, its one of the first batch they made, but its no longer factory I've done a ton of work to it to make it a great printer. SketchUp is probably one of the easiest Cad programs to learn and its free not as powerful as some but its very good and has a ton of plugins that make life easier when doing designs from scratch. The XYZ brand of printers are affordable and Honestly they don't print half bad right out of the box they also now have a laser engraver attachment so you can get the best of both worlds. I got the first run so no option for that, but I do own a 50W laser engraver/cutter machine also.
 

Moxis

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Thanks again epicdoom. I have been studying several 3d cad programs, and have so far thought to start learning Fusion360, which should be free for hobbyists. But also I assume that being intended for professionals, it might be too difficult to learn. So sketchup might be a better choice for a hobbyist like me, who do not ever need all the fancy features that the more complex programs are offering. So you have turned my head, I have to start learning sketchup. Thank you!
About the 3d printers, those which I have so far seen, are producing much worse quality than I would like to have. If you want a complex part with perfectly smooth surface for your model to be printed, and after printing it still needs a lot of sanding and filling, much easier it would have been to produce the part with old school method, sawing, filing, sanding from stock. This is the fact that has so far prevented me buying a affordable 3d printer.
 

epicdoom

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anytime Brother. I have tried fusion 360 and its a decent program, but difficult and the free version isn't complete like the paid version. most all of the printers on the market that would be considered affordable by a hobbyist 200-600$ will have print lines the best way to smooth those is to use acetone on a dampened cloth till the lines smooth out there is also a pen that you can buy on amazon you fill the pen and use it to smooth the lines but both of those methods are slow and take time.

the absolute best way is to take a container metal preferably warm the container with acetone in it the best method for this is to set it in hot water. The acetone will start to vaporize and rise, so I hang the part above the liquid and watch as the vapor rises it wets the part and the lines smooth out, once its smooth I remove it and run it under water to clean any acetone vapor off the part and halt the process. sanding is to hard and you don't want to be breathing in that dust. My printer prints pretty good the lines are very small like grooves on a record I don't personally mind them for most stuff, but anything that will be a show piece I like to smooth. this acetone process also gives the part a glossy finish
 

Moxis

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Thanks again epicdoom. That trick with acetone is a good one, I have never heard it before. Which filament material are you using? ABS maybe? I have to think again the purchase of a 3d printer.
 

epicdoom

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I use ABS Most of the time, but the mods I have done to my Printer allow me to use any filament on the market. I have printed in PLA and Ninja flex as well, the problem with doing some filaments is it requires different heat to extrude and bond properly. The mods I have done allow me to dial in the heat exactly where I need it to be to run any filament on the market today and there are many types for different applications. For the most part ASB will get nearly every job done and its the most widely used. there are a ton of videos on youtube one how to smooth out your prints, but for me the acetone vapor method works well and its fast. the resource for ready made designs is huge there is a site called thingiverse that has a ton of designs that are ready to print just download and print, here is a link https://www.thingiverse.com/ there are other sites but many want money for the designs. I have several designs I posted here and that's the main payback to the community the more designs we post the better the community grows. and you can if you want donate to the designer, but its not required. many designs are also not intended for commercial sale so only print what you need for personal use and not for sale.
 
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