Rowing boats on decks

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My deckwork is proceeding nicely and my attention is now turning to the rowing boats.

I was wondering how the boats were heaved down from their moorings onto the deck below and subsequently down to the water. My Endeavour kit from Occre has only one boat, but there were more, I am sure and I am going to add one more. The boat is placed on the spare top masts, spanned between two supports and then lashed with rope to the 6 eyes on the deck below it. See photo below (boat still in build - image to show where the boat(s) is (are) placed. My question is, did the ships of that time (mid 18th C) have hoisting equipment as my kit doesn't consider such equipment, or were the boats manhandled into position? I can imagine it wasn't easy to lower the boat to the water and back out of the water onto the ship without hoisting equipment!

I have read through my books on the subject of model ship building and ploughed through the internet, but wasn't able to find relevant information. Can somebody help me further?
Thank you.

IMG_4442 (2).JPG
 

Uwek

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Hallo my friend,
these boats were much too heavy to lift them only by human hands - also the spare yard-arms.
These sailing ships had every time their lifting and hoisting equipment on board.
They used the running rigging and the yardarms for such activities

TEXT-BOOK OF SEAMANSHIP

Harland1.jpg

plate76.jpg

plate78.jpg

From the "Seamanship in the Age of Sail" by John Harland

Harland2.jpg

 
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Hi Uwe,

Excellent response. Many thanks for the detailed info.
The tackle would have to be fixed when not in use.
Do you know whether they were they tied in some way to the masts or removed completely and stowed below deck?
Is it necessary from a model detail point of view to add these tackles to the model itself?
 
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Such tackle was quickly rigged by seasoned sailors for what ever hoisting job was necessary and then taken down and stowed away. You can always model such tackle rigs but most do not...which is why you do not see them depicted on typical model rigging plans. So your decision to model hoisting rigs really depends on the level of fine detail you want to accomplish in your model. The pictures posted above gives you an excellent perspective of such rigs and you can follow them to rig out a hoist for your ship’s boat.
 
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The MS kit "Syren" by Chuck Passaro has rigging the pendants are the first thing to "hang" from the mast, even before the stays. But I've only seen one model with block and tackle hooked to the pendant. Nice effect it was though showing all the lines actually hooked up to the boat ready to lift away.
 
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My deckwork is proceeding nicely and my attention is now turning to the rowing boats.

I was wondering how the boats were heaved down from their moorings onto the deck below and subsequently down to the water. My Endeavour kit from Occre has only one boat, but there were more, I am sure and I am going to add one more. The boat is placed on the spare top masts, spanned between two supports and then lashed with rope to the 6 eyes on the deck below it. See photo below (boat still in build - image to show where the boat(s) is (are) placed. My question is, did the ships of that time (mid 18th C) have hoisting equipment as my kit doesn't consider such equipment, or were the boats manhandled into position? I can imagine it wasn't easy to lower the boat to the water and back out of the water onto the ship without hoisting equipment!

I have read through my books on the subject of model ship building and ploughed through the internet, but wasn't able to find relevant information. Can somebody help me further?
Thank you.

View attachment 189485
The topic is well covered by description and illustrations: Seamanship in the Age of Sail, John Harland with illustrations by Mark Myers, Naval Institute Press, Chapter 20 - Lowering and Hoisting in Boats, pp. 282 - 88. It follows a relevant preceding chapter 19 - shifting of heavy weights. F
My deckwork is proceeding nicely and my attention is now turning to the rowing boats.

I was wondering how the boats were heaved down from their moorings onto the deck below and subsequently down to the water. My Endeavour kit from Occre has only one boat, but there were more, I am sure and I am going to add one more. The boat is placed on the spare top masts, spanned between two supports and then lashed with rope to the 6 eyes on the deck below it. See photo below (boat still in build - image to show where the boat(s) is (are) placed. My question is, did the ships of that time (mid 18th C) have hoisting equipment as my kit doesn't consider such equipment, or were the boats manhandled into position? I can imagine it wasn't easy to lower the boat to the water and back out of the water onto the ship without hoisting equipment!

I have read through my books on the subject of model ship building and ploughed through the internet, but wasn't able to find relevant information. Can somebody help me further?
Thank you.

View attachment 189485
I started a reply with the following recommended book that it appears some illustrations have already been posted:
Seamanship in the Age of Sail.jpg
Now to Chapter 20 - Lowering and Hoisting in Boats Page 282Chapt 20 Lowering and Hoisting of Boats 284.jpgChapt. 20 Lowering and Hoisting of Boats 282.jpg
The page order is switched but you can get an idea of the full coverage including the commands given in the execution of each evolution. Well worth the price. It doesn't cost... it pays! PT-2 (Rich)
 
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They used to have a block and tackle rigged to the end of the fore and main yards, and when it wasn't in use they used to pull it up to the yard with a smaller tackle called a thriving line and then it was tied off along the yard,
Best regards John,
 
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They used to have a block and tackle rigged to the end of the fore and main yards, and when it wasn't in use they used to pull it up to the yard with a smaller tackle called a thriving line and then it was tied off along the yard,
Best regards John,
Getting back as promised. You have the simple answer prior to mine so I will add some illustrations and text if you can read it. I have not replied to use of davits which are a different system.Stay and Yard Tackle.jpgThat illustrated the prior explanation. Next is the Text and an illustrationStays and Yard Tackle Page.jpg
Raising and Lowering.jpgCombined tackle rigged.jpg
A question arises how you want to display the boats and raising/lowering. . . are you going to show one at some point in the evolution where it will be in the air? Have fun with these. PT-2 (Rich)
A question came t
 
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Getting back as promised. You have the simple answer prior to mine so I will add some illustrations and text if you can read it. I have not replied to use of davits which are a different system.View attachment 192077That illustrated the prior explanation. Next is the Text and an illustrationView attachment 192078
View attachment 192079View attachment 192080
A question arises how you want to display the boats and raising/lowering. . . are you going to show one at some point in the evolution where it will be in the air? Have fun with these. PT-2 (Rich)
A question came t
Recommended without any reservation!!!! PT-2 (Rich)
 
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