Surface treatment of plank on frame hull

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What do you think about surface treatment (some kind of dried oil) when it comes to plank on frame hull. Do you paint when the hull is finished or continuously during the building process? If you paint when the hull is finished, you may not get to paint in all places, and if you paint as the parts are completed, you may have problems with them not being able to be glued well because of the surface treatment (dried oil)? How do you?
 
What do you think about surface treatment (some kind of dried oil) when it comes to plank on frame hull. Do you paint when the hull is finished or continuously during the building process? If you paint when the hull is finished, you may not get to paint in all places, and if you paint as the parts are completed, you may have problems with them not being able to be glued well because of the surface treatment (dried oil)? How do you?
Personally, I prefer first a coating of Natural Watco Danish Oil. Then after allowing it to fully cure (>3 days) then follow up with a thinned coat of clear spar varnish. But with any method you choose, try it first on scrap wood before commiting it to your model....
 
I learned from a professional model ship builder to coat parts as one builds with matte finish polyurethane. I use MinWax water based matte sheen polyurethane. I apply a protective coating as I finish parts or sections of the build. I have not had any problems gluing said parts onto other parts etc due to the poly coating. No problem using Both PVA and ca glues. I have not had any problems painting over poly coated parts. Stain is another issue. You can stain over a poly coated part but the stain will be light and not penetrate into the wood. The poly does act as a sanding sealer for the part however. So if you want to stain parts do the stain first…then coat with poly. All my models are coated throughout with poly.
 
Agree that linseed oil is perhaps the best dried oil. But there are several for example Chinese oil, Danish oil.
All natural RAW oils require significant time to dry, from 26 to 48 hours.
However if you use 'boiled' Linseed oil, it will dry much faster. When you add to the oil some additives it will dry faster.

Raw Linseed Oil is the purest form of oil, extracted from the flax seed and sold without any chemicals, solutions, or additives to preserve it. This is perfect for oil-based paints as it allows them to completely level and set properly, giving a smoother finish. However, slow drying times often limit the use of Raw Linseed Oil to items where drying time is not a consideration.

Boiled Linseed Oil is regular Linseed Oil that is treated with hot air and additives so that it dries quickly. Unlike the name suggests, it isn't actually boiled!

Danish Oil is a blend, and most likely has additives, so it will dry faster.
 
At the moment I’m experimenting with various finishes on scrap pear for my Blandford build, from stains, oils and varnishes, I think that soon I’ll have my own definitive favourite, at the moment my best results for staining are with a spirit penetrating type, it doesn’t seem to lift the wood fibres.
 
Hello Ornholt, I am new to this forum and am still trying to figure out how to navigate the site. Do you have some pictures of your Oseberg Viking ship posted here, and if so how can I access them to view ? Thanks, Pellican Bill
 
Use the search function (magnifying glass) search for Ornholt and my build log for the Viking ship will come up
 
I am using Tung oil. Does linseed oil have any advantage over Tung oil?
 
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