Book review THE BOATS OF MEN-OF - WAR by M.E. May

Uwek

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THE BOATS OF MEN-OF-WAR
by M.E. May


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  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Inst Pr; Revised edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 0.8 x 10 inches, 19,7 x 1,9 x 25,4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
on abebooks in moment available for less than 1 GBP so appr. 1,- US$ !!!!

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Synopsis:

In the age of sail, the boats carried by the men-of-war were an essential part of the ship's outfitting. They were necessary to move stores, act as the "engine" in confined waters, serve as amphibious raiders, and even to cruise independently as tenders to the mother ship. Over the centuries there have been many sizes, hull forms, and rigs employed, so the exact details proved a problem for model makers, marine artists, and builders of replicas.

In 1974 the original edition of this book was published by the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, England. Still the only complete study of this neglected topic, the book has now been revised and expanded to include more illustrations. It covers the sizes and types of boats formally allocated, the methods of hoisting and stowing them aboard ship, and the design and construction of the boats themselves, as well as their fittings, rigs, and armament, including guns, howitzers, and Congreve rockets. Although primarily devoted to the age of sail, the book also covers the steamboats of the late nineteenth century.

Ship modelers, historians of the sailing navy, and small-craft enthusiasts will welcome this new edition.

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Contents:

Foreword
Chapter 1 - Early History
Establishments of Boats, 1600 - 1700
Chapter 2 - Types of Boats
Hoisting Boats
Chapter 3 - Nineteenth Century Developments
New Boat Types - Lifeboats - Hoisting Boats - Coppering Punt or Balsa Raft
Chapter 4 - Sails and Rigging
Chapter 5 - Coming of Steam
Chapter 6 - Arming Boats
Notes, Index

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Review:

Modeler building historic shipmodels either from kits or especially from scratch, are definitely once confronted with the question about "Which boats and how much my ship had in reality?" The information will be found in this small but valuable book.
The Author M.E. May was working in the National Maritime Museum NMM for a longer time and had access to all necessary available information like models, drawings and documents. So he had the chance to collect all these information and concentrated this in this book.
Starting with the development of boats over centuries, draughts, definitions by the admirality connected to boats and also measurements of different elements of the boat construction....... you can find these information.
If you want to work seriously on boats it should be in your library.....especially, due to the fact, that this book was never a best seller, you can get a used copy on abebooks for less than 1 GBP, so appr. 1 US$............no money for a comprehensive study of this detail
Therefore -> Try to get one copy -> definitely worth

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zoly99sask

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Looks like another interesting book,probably I am never going to have a library like you.

Zoltan
 
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THE BOATS OF MEN-OF-WAR
by M.E. May


View attachment 40597 View attachment 40598
  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Inst Pr; Revised edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 0.8 x 10 inches, 19,7 x 1,9 x 25,4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
on abebooks in moment available for less than 1 GBP so appr. 1,- US$ !!!!

View attachment 40599 View attachment 40600

Synopsis:

In the age of sail, the boats carried by the men-of-war were an essential part of the ship's outfitting. They were necessary to move stores, act as the "engine" in confined waters, serve as amphibious raiders, and even to cruise independently as tenders to the mother ship. Over the centuries there have been many sizes, hull forms, and rigs employed, so the exact details proved a problem for model makers, marine artists, and builders of replicas.

In 1974 the original edition of this book was published by the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, England. Still the only complete study of this neglected topic, the book has now been revised and expanded to include more illustrations. It covers the sizes and types of boats formally allocated, the methods of hoisting and stowing them aboard ship, and the design and construction of the boats themselves, as well as their fittings, rigs, and armament, including guns, howitzers, and Congreve rockets. Although primarily devoted to the age of sail, the book also covers the steamboats of the late nineteenth century.

Ship modelers, historians of the sailing navy, and small-craft enthusiasts will welcome this new edition.

View attachment 40601 View attachment 40602


Contents:

Foreword
Chapter 1 - Early History
Establishments of Boats, 1600 - 1700
Chapter 2 - Types of Boats
Hoisting Boats
Chapter 3 - Nineteenth Century Developments
New Boat Types - Lifeboats - Hoisting Boats - Coppering Punt or Balsa Raft
Chapter 4 - Sails and Rigging
Chapter 5 - Coming of Steam
Chapter 6 - Arming Boats
Notes, Index

View attachment 40603 View attachment 40604


Review:

Modeler building historic shipmodels either from kits or especially from scratch, are definitely once confronted with the question about "Which boats and how much my ship had in reality?" The information will be found in this small but valuable book.
The Author M.E. May was working in the National Maritime Museum NMM for a longer time and had access to all necessary available information like models, drawings and documents. So he had the chance to collect all these information and concentrated this in this book.
Starting with the development of boats over centuries, draughts, definitions by the admirality connected to boats and also measurements of different elements of the boat construction....... you can find these information.
If you want to work seriously on boats it should be in your library.....especially, due to the fact, that this book was never a best seller, you can get a used copy on abebooks for less than 1 GBP, so appr. 1 US$............no money for a comprehensive study of this detail
Therefore -> Try to get one copy -> definitely worth

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Somehow I have two copies of this book! Well worth having.
One gripe I have with this genre of publication. Usually all the illustrations are vastly reduced copies of NMM collections. Obviously these reproductions give a flavour of the subject, but as sources for model-making, they are useless. A cheap way to fill out any book.
 

Uwek

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Somehow I have two copies of this book! Well worth having.
One gripe I have with this genre of publication. Usually all the illustrations are vastly reduced copies of NMM collections. Obviously these reproductions give a flavour of the subject, but as sources for model-making, they are useless. A cheap way to fill out any book.
I agree with your words, nevertheless it is a source combining a lot of information of this specific subject in one book......and for the actual price level worth to have it
 
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Hi All
Im based in Egypt so i dont have any easy access to most of the books specially with shipping problems nowadays cause the COVID restrictions
Im planning to start building a first rate british ship (Britannia 1762). I need to know the type and number of boats on this ship. I need the plans for these boats. I appreciate your help and suggestions
 

Uwek

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Hi All
Im based in Egypt so i dont have any easy access to most of the books specially with shipping problems nowadays cause the COVID restrictions
Im planning to start building a first rate british ship (Britannia 1762). I need to know the type and number of boats on this ship. I need the plans for these boats. I appreciate your help and suggestions
Take a look at this Book Review "HMS Victory building, restauration and repair" by Arthur Bugler
There you can see some drawings of the four different types of boats used on the HMS Victory. The HMS Britannia had the same.....she was launched in the same time period and had a similar size....
 

Uwek

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Hi All
Im based in Egypt so i dont have any easy access to most of the books specially with shipping problems nowadays cause the COVID restrictions
Im planning to start building a first rate british ship (Britannia 1762). I need to know the type and number of boats on this ship. I need the plans for these boats. I appreciate your help and suggestions
And here I found the numbers

Six boats carried aboard HMS Victory were comprised of a Launch, Barge, 3 Cutters and a Pinnace which is a light boat, propelled by sails or oars, formerly used as a tender for guiding merchant and war vessels. These boats were used for many purposes including conveying stores, personnel, mooring and anchoring the ship. They were also employed for towing when calm wind stalled the ship. The Launch was the largest of the boats on board being 34 feet (10.3m) long and used for carrying men and supplies, and at times anchor work. The boat was usually rowed by 16 oarsmen, and could also be sailed. Troops were ferried to shore in the boats and were the first assault craft to be used in war. The boats were not considered lifeboats, to lower a boat took too much time to save a sailor who fell overboard, life at sea was expendable. During battle removing wooden objects was necessary to reduce collateral damage of splintered wood flying across the deck. All wood items were sent below the main and gun decks, like mess tables, benches and furniture. The boats were towed behind to limit cannon hits creating flying splinters. When clearing the decks for action was called an experienced crew could clear the decks in a ship the size of Victory in ten minutes.
 
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Hi All
I Need your help in clarifying some problem i face in understanding the plan
I followed the lines of the stern and keel and i feel that it looks weird . I think i don't understand the position of the stern frame (blue circle( and i don't understand the curves in the stern keel (red lines)

Can you please clarify where should i place them

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