The Inspiration & Challenge of LA SALAMANDRE continues:

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Dear Jimmy,
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Birthday-Cake Beer :)
we wish you all the BEST and celebrate the dayExplosionBottle
 

Jimsky

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my error Kortes is not building the Jacinthe ...it is a danish ship he is building
Hello @smelly and @tonphil1960 Kortes (Alexander) did build Le Jasinte from ANCRE plans


Here is the nice companion: the monograph and planet from ANCRE publication. If you decide to build one, this book will help you a lot. It is inexpencive, thought.

 
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Hello @smelly and @tonphil1960 Kortes (Alexander) did build Le Jasinte from ANCRE plans


Here is the nice companion: the monograph and planet from ANCRE publication. If you decide to build one, this book will help you a lot. It is inexpencive, thought.

Yes I ordered that monograph yesterday... expecting it in 3 weeks
 
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Hallo Jimmy,
we wish you all the BEST and a HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Enjoy your day
Birthday-Cake
Hope to see soon some updates of your great Salamandre .....
As with the rest of SoS applauding and congratulating your well spent five months or dedicated carving I cannot say enough, completely astounded at your skills, both with carving tools making and their application. You set a high standard for others to follow. PT-2
 
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So it's been a while since I had some progress on my Salamandre model that I could share. I'll blame it on the current world condition, but it might be me. It seems like the duties and the chores of day-to-day living are more complicated and take so much longer to do these days.

Ah, but the moments I spend at the work bench with La Salamandre are still restorative. In my last posting I was just getting ready to start building the top third of the quarter galleries. That area includes, among other things, carvings of a mortar barrel, a long-gun barrel, and a flag. Jean Boudriot, as he often does, has drawn these features quite differently in different plates. I know that a few of you have the drawings so I will simply mention that he draws this area as a relief carving in PL. X and as more of a shadow-box carving in PL. XII. Truly, the differences are fascinating and if you have access to the drawings it will take some very close scrutiny to fully grasp the points I am referring to. And I will also admit that I may be lending a tiny bit of personal bias, because I really wanted to addhe dramatic effect of the shadow-box approach to my model.

The middle and lower sections of the quarter gallery carvings required filler blocks before the carvings could be added, but the shadow-box method only required that I make a backdrop and frame, into which carvings could be installed. The photo below is the 2 backdrops - one assembled.

DSC_0001.JPG


Since this is not a relief carving, I turned both gun barrels and the flaming bomb on the lathe. Guns are ebony and the bomb is pear. The flag is holly and it kept me up a few nights. It's not perfect but I'm happy!

Oh that gun wasn't there in my last post. I'll get to that in a moment.

DSC_0009 (1).JPG

DSC_0008 (1).JPG


No special tricks here. Just careful measurements, tiny pencil marks, and constant use of calipers. Fortunately this isn't a ship of the line!

DSC_0005.JPG

DSC_0008 (2).JPG


Obviously, the carriage cheeks were all sliced from the block at the top center. I find the most challenging aspect of building these carriages to be gluing them together so their sides are perfectly plumb and they splay out aft at the correct angle, and they're actually symmetrical, etc. So I built a jig for that which is demonstrated in my next two photos.

DSC_0003.JPG


I placed an assembled carriage next to the working jig so the viewer can easily make out the 2 checks that are clamped in the jig. The jig consists of 2 parts, the outer frame and the wedge between the carriage cheeks. Also there is an axletree in the picture. The carriage will become a stable unit once a pair of axletrees is glued to the bottom of it. So we next flip the jig over to make that possible.

DSC_0006.JPG


There were notches cut in the cheeks while they were in the jig. That gives them the precise splay angle. You can see the rabbit cuts in the jig where the saw blade travelled. The same saw settings were used to notch all 16 cheeks.

Next note two thin strips of wood to either side of the interior of the jig. They are lifting the cheeks about one sixteenth of an inch higher than the underside of the jig, at this stage of the assembly process, so the axletrees can be easily glued without gluing everything to the jig. I used a fairly liquid form of superglue. A snug joint and almost no glue at all does a great job here. FYI, these carriages are about an inch long.

DSC_0007.JPG


Here's the first one. Now back to the bench to finish the rest. That will no doubt take me another week.

DSC_0007 (2).JPG
 
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So it's been a while since I had some progress on my Salamandre model that I could share. I'll blame it on the current world condition, but it might be me. It seems like the duties and the chores of day-to-day living are more complicated and take so much longer to do these days.

Ah, but the moments I spend at the work bench with La Salamandre are still restorative. In my last posting I was just getting ready to start building the top third of the quarter galleries. That area includes, among other things, carvings of a mortar barrel, a long-gun barrel, and a flag. Jean Boudriot, as he often does, has drawn these features quite differently in different plates. I know that a few of you have the drawings so I will simply mention that he draws this area as a relief carving in PL. X and as more of a shadow-box carving in PL. XII. Truly, the differences are fascinating and if you have access to the drawings it will take some very close scrutiny to fully grasp the points I am referring to. And I will also admit that I may be lending a tiny bit of personal bias, because I really wanted to addhe dramatic effect of the shadow-box approach to my model.

The middle and lower sections of the quarter gallery carvings required filler blocks before the carvings could be added, but the shadow-box method only required that I make a backdrop and frame, into which carvings could be installed. The photo below is the 2 backdrops - one assembled.

View attachment 193076


Since this is not a relief carving, I turned both gun barrels and the flaming bomb on the lathe. Guns are ebony and the bomb is pear. The flag is holly and it kept me up a few nights. It's not perfect but I'm happy!

Oh that gun wasn't there in my last post. I'll get to that in a moment.

View attachment 193119

View attachment 193120


No special tricks here. Just careful measurements, tiny pencil marks, and constant use of calipers. Fortunately this isn't a ship of the line!

View attachment 193142

View attachment 193143


Obviously, the carriage cheeks were all sliced from the block at the top center. I find the most challenging aspect of building these carriages to be gluing them together so their sides are perfectly plumb and they splay out aft at the correct angle, and they're actually symmetrical, etc. So I built a jig for that which is demonstrated in my next two photos.

View attachment 193144


I placed an assembled carriage next to the working jig so the viewer can easily make out the 2 checks that are clamped in the jig. The jig consists of 2 parts, the outer frame and the wedge between the carriage cheeks. Also there is an axletree in the picture. The carriage will become a stable unit once a pair of axletrees is glued to the bottom of it. So we next flip the jig over to make that possible.

View attachment 193145


There were notches cut in the cheeks while they were in the jig. That gives them the precise splay angle. You can see the rabbit cuts in the jig where the saw blade travelled. The same saw settings were used to notch all 16 cheeks.

Next note two thin strips of wood to either side of the interior of the jig. They are lifting the cheeks about one sixteenth of an inch higher than the underside of the jig, at this stage of the assembly process, so the axletrees can be easily glued without gluing everything to the jig. I used a fairly liquid form of superglue. A snug joint and almost no glue at all does a great job here. FYI, these carriages are about an inch long.

View attachment 193146


Here's the first one. Now back to the bench to finish the rest. That will no doubt take me another week.

View attachment 193150
Beautifully and precisely done at this small scale. What are the dimensions? I think that your assembly jig was aa great idea and a project within itself both in the conception and then construction. Time spent well paid back! I stand in awe of your carving skills. Well done all the way around. Rich (PT-2)
 
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Thanks PT-2. Shaky fingers make jigs like that an absolute necessity.

The scale is 1:48 and the guns are 6 pounders. A finished carriage is 1-1/16" long and 13/16" wide at the axletrees. A complete gun is 2-1/8" long including the handle on the elevation wedge.
It is difficult to see but the capstock pieces securing the trunnions in place are also meticulous with the hinge and fore locking pin. Can you please send an elevation photo of that area? Sorry to be a pest put I have not been very successful in the hinge and pin areas. I used sheet copper to bend as needed and then blacken but on my actual firing cannon have used round head brass screws. . . something to consider for appearance but more-so in the actual recoil forces. Thanks, Rich
 
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Thanks for noticing that Rich. The whole time I was creating those capstocks I was wondering if anyone would ever appreciate them!! And I still have 14 more to build. Yes they are complete. The actual cap squares are made of .018" brass. I machined 2 little pieces of scrap bronze into a stamp that I can use in a vice to squeeze a strip of .018" brass into the shape desired. The pins lying on top at the front and back of each cap are 22 gauge wire that I soldered in place with Stay-Brite solder. I kept the wire long until it was successfully soldered. Then cut it off and filed/sanded the final shape to the cap squares. the hinge is completed by bending the same 22 gauge wire into a tack shape. On the aft hinge side of the cap, there is only one hole needed to slip the tack over the pin and form the hinge -- pretty easy that one. The fore-locking mechanism is two holes rather than the proper slot. Here I drilled holes for a much narrower tack that could be a close fit for a thin metal key. Once everything was superglued in place, I squeezed a bit of wire and filed it into the L-shape of a retainer key and dipped it into a tiny bit of superglue before pressing it into the fore-lock.

You'll think you are out of your mind if you go to these extremes, but I think the result will make you grin.
It is difficult to see but the capstock pieces securing the trunnions in place are also meticulous with the hinge and fore locking pin. Can you please send an elevation photo of that area? Sorry to be a pest put I have not been very successful in the hinge and pin areas. I used sheet copper to bend as needed and then blacken but on my actual firing cannon have used round head brass screws. . . something to consider for appearance but more-so in the actual recoil forces. Thanks, Rich

DSC_0001 (3).JPG
 

Uwek

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Hallo Jim,
very good work on your Salamandre - I like the contrast in color at your stern - black, pear and boxwood - looking very good and very well done.
And also very good carriages and muzzles - From my side you are getting an "A"
 
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Thanks for noticing that Rich. The whole time I was creating those capstocks I was wondering if anyone would ever appreciate them!! And I still have 14 more to build. Yes they are complete. The actual cap squares are made of .018" brass. I machined 2 little pieces of scrap bronze into a stamp that I can use in a vice to squeeze a strip of .018" brass into the shape desired. The pins lying on top at the front and back of each cap are 22 gauge wire that I soldered in place with Stay-Brite solder. I kept the wire long until it was successfully soldered. Then cut it off and filed/sanded the final shape to the cap squares. the hinge is completed by bending the same 22 gauge wire into a tack shape. On the aft hinge side of the cap, there is only one hole needed to slip the tack over the pin and form the hinge -- pretty easy that one. The fore-locking mechanism is two holes rather than the proper slot. Here I drilled holes for a much narrower tack that could be a close fit for a thin metal key. Once everything was superglued in place, I squeezed a bit of wire and filed it into the L-shape of a retainer key and dipped it into a tiny bit of superglue before pressing it into the fore-lock.

You'll think you are out of your mind if you go to these extremes, but I think the result will make you grin.


View attachment 193235
Not out of mind when you/we/I try to present things correctly and not pass over them. That is the frustration that I have with my small blackpowder muzzle loading ~6 inch cannon. The capsquares are just bent copper without a proper breach end hinge and muzzle end locking pin assembly which would withstand the large firing recoil. The small RH brass screws work but are not correct. Maybe I can with some effort and not the forming and solid soldering skill/equipment work something out between times on the range where I am working out the elevation bolsters and impacts at varying ranges. I need a large remote calm pond to see what the actual range is. The devil is in the details! Rich (PT-2)
 
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Thanks for noticing that Rich. The whole time I was creating those capstocks I was wondering if anyone would ever appreciate them!! And I still have 14 more to build. Yes they are complete. The actual cap squares are made of .018" brass. I machined 2 little pieces of scrap bronze into a stamp that I can use in a vice to squeeze a strip of .018" brass into the shape desired. The pins lying on top at the front and back of each cap are 22 gauge wire that I soldered in place with Stay-Brite solder. I kept the wire long until it was successfully soldered. Then cut it off and filed/sanded the final shape to the cap squares. the hinge is completed by bending the same 22 gauge wire into a tack shape. On the aft hinge side of the cap, there is only one hole needed to slip the tack over the pin and form the hinge -- pretty easy that one. The fore-locking mechanism is two holes rather than the proper slot. Here I drilled holes for a much narrower tack that could be a close fit for a thin metal key. Once everything was superglued in place, I squeezed a bit of wire and filed it into the L-shape of a retainer key and dipped it into a tiny bit of superglue before pressing it into the fore-lock.

You'll think you are out of your mind if you go to these extremes, but I think the result will make you grin.


View attachment 193235
Oh yes. . . your turning of the barrels is well detailed and executed. The challenge is a turned metal barrel of actual firing size is getting the trunions square and secure. That is partly explained in my copy of The Art of Ship Modeling. Rich
 
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Just found your posts on Salamandre - totally bowled over! Beautiful work that I don't think I could ever emulate.
Very well done!

Ted
 
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