Naval/Maritime History 26th of November - Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

17th of November

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events


1743 – Launch of French Tonnant, 80-guns at Toulon, design by François Coulomb the Younger
Tonnant was an 80-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. She was the flagship of the French fleet at the Second battle of Cape Finisterre, and later took part in the Battle of Quiberon Bay, and in the American War of Independence. She was broken up in 1780.
Combat_naval_bataille_cap_finisterre_octobre_1747.jpg



1800 - Boats of HMS Captain (74), HMS Magicienne (32), HMS Nile (12) and HMS Suwarrow (10) destroyed French corvette Reolaise (20) in Port Navalo
On 17 November, Captain Sir Richard Strachan in Captain chased a French convoy in to the Morbihan where it sheltered under the protection of shore batteries and the 20-gun corvette Réolaise. Lieutenant Argles skillful maneuvered Nile, as the first British vessel up, and kept the corvette from the north shore. Magicienne was then able to force the corvette onto the shore at Port Navale, though she got off again. The hired armed cutter Suworow then towed in four boats with Lieutenant Hennah of Captain and a cutting-out party of seamen and marines. Nile and the hired armed cutter Lurcher towed in four more boats from Magicienne. Although the cutting-out party landed under heavy fire of grape and musketry, it was able to set the corvette on fire; shortly thereafter she blew up. Only one British seaman, a crewman from Suworow, was killed; seven men from Captain were wounded. However, Suworow's sails and rigging were so badly cut up that Captain had to tow her. Nile captured a merchant vessel that was then burnt.
HMS_Captain_capturing_the_San_Nicolas_and_the_San_Josef.jpg



1804 – Launch of French Achille, a Téméraire-class 74-gun French ship of the line built at Rochefort in 1803 after plans by Jacques-Noël Sané
1280px-Achille_mp3h9307.jpg

1280px-Achille_mp3h9310.jpg 1280px-Achille_mp3h9311.jpg 1280px-Achille_mp3h9316.jpg
A 1⁄33 scale model is on display in Paris at the Musée de la Marine.

1804 – Launch of HMS Hibernia, 110 gun first rate ship of the line
HMS Hibernia
was a 110-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She was launched at Plymouth dockyard on 17 November 1804, and was the only ship built to her draught, designed by Sir John Henslow.
large (5).jpg


800px-Figurehead_HMS_Hibernia_1804_MMM_n01.jpg
Figurehead of the HMS Hibernia (1804).

1863 - The screw sloop USS Monongahela escorts Army troops and covers their landing on Mustang Island, Texas while her Sailors shell Confederate works until the defenders surrender.
USS Monongahela (1862)
was a barkentine–rigged screw sloop-of-war that served in the Union Navy during the American Civil War. Her task was to participate in the Union blockade of the Confederate States of America. Post-war, she continued serving her country in various roles, such as that of a storeship and schoolship
USS_Monongahela_(1862).jpg


1874 - Cospatrick, a wooden three-masted full-rigged sailing ship, caught fire south of the Cape of Good Hope. Only three of the 472 persons on board survived the disaster, which is often considered the worst in New Zealand's history.
Cospatrick was a wooden three-masted full-rigged sailing ship that caught fire south of the Cape of Good Hope on 17 November 1874, while on a voyage from Gravesend, England, to Auckland, New Zealand. Only three of the 472 persons on board survived the disaster, which is often considered the worst in New Zealand's history.
The_Cospatrick_-_The_Graphic_9_Jan._1875.jpg


1898 – Launch of HMS Formidable (1898)
HMS Formidable
, the third of four ships of that name to serve in the Royal Navy, was the lead ship of her class of pre-dreadnought battleships. The ship was laid down in March 1898, was launched in November that year, and was completed in September 1901. Problems with the contractors that supplied her machinery delayed her commissioning until 1904. Formidable served initially with the Mediterranean Fleet, transferring to the Channel Fleet in 1908. In 1912, she was assigned to the 5th Battle Squadron, which was stationed at Nore.
1024px-thumbnail.jpg


1914 - SMS Friedrich Carl was a German armored cruiser mined and sunk
SMS Friedrich Carl
was a German armored cruiser built in the early 1900s for the Imperial German Navy. She was the second ship of the Prinz Adalbert class. Friedrich Carl was built in Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg. She was laid down in 1901, and completed in December 1903, at the cost of 15,665,000 Marks. She was armed with a main battery of four 21 cm (8.3 in) guns and was capable of a top speed of 20.4 kn (37.8 km/h; 23.5 mph).
The_people's_war_book;_history,_cyclopaedia_and_chronology_of_the_great_world_war_(1919)_(1478...jpg



1280px-FriedrichCarlMiniatureDM.jpg

Midsection of SMS Friedrich Carl in a miniature in the Deutsches Museum

1914 – Launch of HMS Royal Oak (08), one of five Revenge-class battleships
HMS Royal Oak
was one of five Revenge-class battleships built for the Royal Navy during the First World War. Launched in 1914 and completed in 1916, Royal Oak first saw combat at the Battle of Jutland as part of the Grand Fleet. In peacetime, she served in the Atlantic, Home and Mediterranean fleets, more than once coming under accidental attack. The ship drew worldwide attention in 1928 when her senior officers were controversially court-martialled. Attempts to modernise Royal Oak throughout her 25-year career could not fix her fundamental lack of speed and by the start of the Second World War, she was no longer suited to front-line duty.
HMS_Revenge_(1916)_profile_drawing.png


1917 - Second Battle of Heligoland Bight
The Second Battle of Heligoland Bight, also called the Action in the Helgoland Bight was an inconclusive naval engagement fought between British and German squadrons on 17 November 1917 during the First World War.
HMS_Calypso.jpg


1921 - Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga launched
Kaga (加賀) was an aircraft carrier built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) and was named after the former Kaga Province in present-day Ishikawa Prefecture. Originally intended to be one of two Tosa-class battleships, Kaga was converted under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty to an aircraft carrier as the replacement for the battlecruiser Amagi, which had been damaged during the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake. Kaga was rebuilt in 1933–35, increasing her top speed, improving her exhaust systems, and adapting her flight decks to more modern, heavier aircraft.

The ship figured prominently in the development of the IJN's carrier striking force doctrine, which grouped carriers together to give greater mass and concentration to their air power. A revolutionary strategic concept at the time, the employment of the doctrine was crucial in enabling Japan to attain its initial strategic goals during the first six months of the Pacific War.
1280px-Kaga_Ikari_1930_B.jpg
 
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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

17th of November

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events


1743 – Launch of French Tonnant, 80-guns at Toulon, design by François Coulomb the Younger
Tonnant was an 80-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. She was the flagship of the French fleet at the Second battle of Cape Finisterre, and later took part in the Battle of Quiberon Bay, and in the American War of Independence. She was broken up in 1780.
Combat_naval_bataille_cap_finisterre_octobre_1747.jpg



1800 - Boats of HMS Captain (74), HMS Magicienne (32), HMS Nile (12) and HMS Suwarrow (10) destroyed French corvette Reolaise (20) in Port Navalo
On 17 November, Captain Sir Richard Strachan in Captain chased a French convoy in to the Morbihan where it sheltered under the protection of shore batteries and the 20-gun corvette Réolaise. Lieutenant Argles skillful maneuvered Nile, as the first British vessel up, and kept the corvette from the north shore. Magicienne was then able to force the corvette onto the shore at Port Navale, though she got off again. The hired armed cutter Suworow then towed in four boats with Lieutenant Hennah of Captain and a cutting-out party of seamen and marines. Nile and the hired armed cutter Lurcher towed in four more boats from Magicienne. Although the cutting-out party landed under heavy fire of grape and musketry, it was able to set the corvette on fire; shortly thereafter she blew up. Only one British seaman, a crewman from Suworow, was killed; seven men from Captain were wounded. However, Suworow's sails and rigging were so badly cut up that Captain had to tow her. Nile captured a merchant vessel that was then burnt.
HMS_Captain_capturing_the_San_Nicolas_and_the_San_Josef.jpg



1804 – Launch of French Achille, a Téméraire-class 74-gun French ship of the line built at Rochefort in 1803 after plans by Jacques-Noël Sané
1280px-Achille_mp3h9307.jpg

1280px-Achille_mp3h9310.jpg 1280px-Achille_mp3h9311.jpg 1280px-Achille_mp3h9316.jpg
A 1⁄33 scale model is on display in Paris at the Musée de la Marine.

1804 – Launch of HMS Hibernia, 110 gun first rate ship of the line
HMS Hibernia
was a 110-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She was launched at Plymouth dockyard on 17 November 1804, and was the only ship built to her draught, designed by Sir John Henslow.
large (5).jpg


800px-Figurehead_HMS_Hibernia_1804_MMM_n01.jpg
Figurehead of the HMS Hibernia (1804).

1863 - The screw sloop USS Monongahela escorts Army troops and covers their landing on Mustang Island, Texas while her Sailors shell Confederate works until the defenders surrender.
USS Monongahela (1862)
was a barkentine–rigged screw sloop-of-war that served in the Union Navy during the American Civil War. Her task was to participate in the Union blockade of the Confederate States of America. Post-war, she continued serving her country in various roles, such as that of a storeship and schoolship
USS_Monongahela_(1862).jpg


1874 - Cospatrick, a wooden three-masted full-rigged sailing ship, caught fire south of the Cape of Good Hope. Only three of the 472 persons on board survived the disaster, which is often considered the worst in New Zealand's history.
Cospatrick was a wooden three-masted full-rigged sailing ship that caught fire south of the Cape of Good Hope on 17 November 1874, while on a voyage from Gravesend, England, to Auckland, New Zealand. Only three of the 472 persons on board survived the disaster, which is often considered the worst in New Zealand's history.
The_Cospatrick_-_The_Graphic_9_Jan._1875.jpg


1898 – Launch of HMS Formidable (1898)
HMS Formidable
, the third of four ships of that name to serve in the Royal Navy, was the lead ship of her class of pre-dreadnought battleships. The ship was laid down in March 1898, was launched in November that year, and was completed in September 1901. Problems with the contractors that supplied her machinery delayed her commissioning until 1904. Formidable served initially with the Mediterranean Fleet, transferring to the Channel Fleet in 1908. In 1912, she was assigned to the 5th Battle Squadron, which was stationed at Nore.
1024px-thumbnail.jpg


1914 - SMS Friedrich Carl was a German armored cruiser mined and sunk
SMS Friedrich Carl
was a German armored cruiser built in the early 1900s for the Imperial German Navy. She was the second ship of the Prinz Adalbert class. Friedrich Carl was built in Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg. She was laid down in 1901, and completed in December 1903, at the cost of 15,665,000 Marks. She was armed with a main battery of four 21 cm (8.3 in) guns and was capable of a top speed of 20.4 kn (37.8 km/h; 23.5 mph).
The_people's_war_book;_history,_cyclopaedia_and_chronology_of_the_great_world_war_(1919)_(1478...jpg's_war_book;_history,_cyclopaedia_and_chronology_of_the_great_world_war_(1919)_(1478...jpg



1280px-FriedrichCarlMiniatureDM.jpg

Midsection of SMS Friedrich Carl in a miniature in the Deutsches Museum

1914 – Launch of HMS Royal Oak (08), one of five Revenge-class battleships
HMS Royal Oak
was one of five Revenge-class battleships built for the Royal Navy during the First World War. Launched in 1914 and completed in 1916, Royal Oak first saw combat at the Battle of Jutland as part of the Grand Fleet. In peacetime, she served in the Atlantic, Home and Mediterranean fleets, more than once coming under accidental attack. The ship drew worldwide attention in 1928 when her senior officers were controversially court-martialled. Attempts to modernise Royal Oak throughout her 25-year career could not fix her fundamental lack of speed and by the start of the Second World War, she was no longer suited to front-line duty.
HMS_Revenge_(1916)_profile_drawing.png


1917 - Second Battle of Heligoland Bight
The Second Battle of Heligoland Bight, also called the Action in the Helgoland Bight was an inconclusive naval engagement fought between British and German squadrons on 17 November 1917 during the First World War.
HMS_Calypso.jpg


1921 - Japanese aircraft carrier Kaga launched
Kaga (加賀) was an aircraft carrier built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) and was named after the former Kaga Province in present-day Ishikawa Prefecture. Originally intended to be one of two Tosa-class battleships, Kaga was converted under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty to an aircraft carrier as the replacement for the battlecruiser Amagi, which had been damaged during the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake. Kaga was rebuilt in 1933–35, increasing her top speed, improving her exhaust systems, and adapting her flight decks to more modern, heavier aircraft.

The ship figured prominently in the development of the IJN's carrier striking force doctrine, which grouped carriers together to give greater mass and concentration to their air power. A revolutionary strategic concept at the time, the employment of the doctrine was crucial in enabling Japan to attain its initial strategic goals during the first six months of the Pacific War.
1280px-Kaga_Ikari_1930_B.jpg
Ok, I am hooked now and will begin scanning this forum regularly as so many interesting items come up by whoever is going to the effort to collect and present them. Well done whomsoever you may be. Thanks, Rich (PT-2) who was surprised about how much time he is spending on the forums and netting a star.
 

Uwek

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Ok, I am hooked now and will begin scanning this forum regularly as so many interesting items come up by whoever is going to the effort to collect and present them. Well done whomsoever you may be. Thanks, Rich (PT-2) who was surprised about how much time he is spending on the forums and netting a star.
So I can say now, that I am very happy, that you have found this topic
and YES - it was a very intensive one year, when I prepared this topic with all the posts regularly on a daily basis...... but the spend time was worth the effort.
In the meantime this topic has 2.000.000 views :cool:
Many Thanks for your and your and your and your interest ....... ;)
 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

18th of November

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events

1766 - Launch of french Belle Poule
Belle Poule was a French frigate of the Dédaigneuse class, which Léon-Michel Guignace built. She is most famous for her duel with the British frigate HMS Arethusa on 17 June 1778, which began the French involvement in the American War of Independence.
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Combat_de_la_Belle_Poule_et_de_l'Aréthusa.jpg

Combat de la Belle Poule et de l'Aréthusa en 1778.

Planset Review: "LA BELLE-POULE - 1765 - 12-pdr frigate" in 1:48 by Jean Boudriot & Hubert Berti

Planset Review: LA BELLE-POULE 1765 - 12-pdr Frigate by ENGINEER GUIGNACE - A STUDY OF 12-PDR FRIGATE - frégate de XII de 1765 By Jean Boudriot & Hubert Berti - Translated by François Fougerat This interesting monograph with 22 drawings mainly in scale 1:48 was published in the original...
shipsofscale.com
la-belle-poule-fregate-1765 (1).jpg



1800 - HMS Leda launched at Chatham. The first of the largest class of sailing frigates ever built for the Royal Navy.
MS Leda
, launched in 1800, was the lead ship of a successful class of forty-seven British Royal Navy 38-gun sailing frigates. Leda's design was based on the French Hébé, which the British had captured in 1782. (Hébé herself was the name vessel for the French Hébé-class frigates. Hébé, therefore, has the rare distinction of being the model for both a French and a British frigate class.) Leda was wrecked at the mouth of Milford Haven in 1808, Capt Honeyman was exonerated of all blame, as it was a pilot error.
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1807 – Launch of HMS Aboukir was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Aboukir
was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 18 November 1807 at Frindsbury.
She was placed on harbour service in 1824, and was sold in 1838.
HMS_Aboukir_(1807).jpg


1809 – In a naval action during the Napoleonic Wars, French frigates defeat British East Indiamen in the Bay of Bengal.
The Action of 18 November 1809 was the most significant engagement of a six-month cruise by a French frigate squadron in the Indian Ocean during the Napoleonic Wars. The French commander, Commodore Jacques Hamelin, raided across the Bay of Bengal with his squadron and achieved local superiority, capturing numerous merchant ships and minor warships. On 18 November 1809, three ships of Hamelin's squadron encountered a convoy of India-bound East Indiamen, mainly carrying recruits for the Indian Army, then administered by the Honourable East India Company (HEIC).
1280px-A_fleet_of_East_Indiamen_at_sea.jpg



1889 - The battleship Maine launched at the New York Navy Yard.
USS Maine (ACR-1)
was an American naval ship that sank in Havana Harbor during the Cuban revolt against Spain, an event that became a major political issue in the United States.
1280px-USS_Maine_entering_Havana_harbor_HD-SN-99-01929.JPEG


1905 - SS Hilda, a steamship owned by the London and South Western Railway. sank in 1905 with the loss of at least 125 lives
SS
Hilda was a steamship owned by the London and South Western Railway. She was used on the Southampton - Channel Islands - St Malo service until she sank in 1905 with the loss of at least 125 lives.
SS_Hilda_shipwreck.jpg


1928 – Release of the animated short Steamboat Willie, the first fully synchronized sound cartoon, directed by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks, featuring the third appearances of cartoon characters Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse. This is considered by the Disney corporation to be Mickey's birthday.

Steamboat_Willie.jpg


 
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Ok, I am hooked now and will begin scanning this forum regularly as so many interesting items come up by whoever is going to the effort to collect and present them. Well done whomsoever you may be. Thanks, Rich (PT-2) who was surprised about how much time he is spending on the forums and netting a star.
yep that topic is my joy every morning with my cup of coffee
always read everything and amazed of the research work involve
 
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yep that topic is my joy every morning with my cup of coffee
always read everything and amazed of the research work involve
We are constantly learning. . . the biggest challenge is where to find the resources! I hope that you can keep up this great offering. Who will continue doing it when you cannot??? Rich (PT-2)
 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

19th of November

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events


1691 – Launch of French Merveilleux, a 80/90-gun Foudroyant-class, at Brest – burnt together with her sistership by the English in the Battle of La Hogue in June 1692
The Merveilleux was a First Rank ship of the line of the French Royal Navy, the second vessel in the two-ship Foudroyant Class.
This ship was ordered in February 1691 to be built - like her sister - at Brest Dockyard, and on 13 May 1691 she was allotted the name Merveilleux. The designer and builder of both ships was Blaise Pangalo. They were three-decker ships without forecastles. The Merveilleux was launched on 11 November 1691 and completed in April 1692.
She was initially armed with 90 guns, comprising twenty-eight 36-pounders on the lower deck, twenty-eight 18-pounders on the middle deck, twenty-four 12-pounders on the upper deck, and ten 6-pounders on the quarterdeck. However she was reduced to 80 guns before the end of 1691.
The new ship took part in the Battle of Barfleur on 29 May 1692, where she was the flagship of Lieutenant-Général Charles-François Davy, Marquis d'Amfreville. Following the battle she and her sister Foudroyant put into La Hogue on the east coast of the Cotentin Peninsula where they were among a dozen French ships of the line attacked and burnt by Anglo-Dutch naval forces on 2 June 1692.
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1746 - HMS Portland (1744 – 50) and HMS Winchelsea (1740 - 24), Cptn. Henry Dyve, took French frigate Subtile off Scilly Isles during which Lt. Samuel Hood wounded.
HMS Winchelsea
was a 20-gun sixth-rate launched in 1740 and in service during the War of the Austrian Succession in Mediterranean, Atlantic and home waters. She was captured by the French in 1758, but was retaken two weeks later. She was broken up in 1761.
HMS Portland was a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at Limehouse according to the dimensions laid down in the 1741 proposals of the 1719 Establishment, and launched on 11 October 1744.

Portland served until 1763, when she was sold out of the navy.
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1804 - HMS Romney (1762 - 50) wrecked off the Texel
HMS Romney was a 50-gun fourth rate of the Royal Navy. She served during the American War of Independence, and the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars in a career that spanned forty years. Five ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Romney. The origins of the name are from the town of New Romney, although it may be that the name entered the Royal Navy in honour of Henry Sydney, 1st Earl of Romney.
The_Loss_of_the_Romney_Man_of_War.jpg

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1808 – Launch of french La Eylau, an 80-gun Bucentaure-class 80-gun ship of the line of the French Navy, designed by Sané.
Begun as Saturne, she was renamed Eylau while still under construction. She was commissioned on 11 March 1809 under Captain Jurien de La Gravière.
In 1811, she was the flagship of Admiral Allemand. The next year she was transferred to Toulon.
After the Bourbon Restoration, she took station in the Caribbean under Captain Larue.
Le_Bucentaure_Anonymous.jpg



1808 – Launch of HMS Owen Glendower (or Owen Glendour), a Royal Navy 36-gun fifth-rate Apollo class frigate
HMS Owen Glendower
(or Owen Glendour) was a Royal Navy 36-gun fifth-rate Apollo class frigate launched in 1808 and disposed of in 1884. In between she was instrumental in the seizure of the Danish island of Anholt, captured prizes in the Channel during the Napoleonic Wars, sailed to the East Indies and South America, participated in the suppression of the slave trade, and served as a prison hulk in Gibraltar before she was sold in 1884.

She was named for "Owen Glendower", Shakespeare’s Anglicization of the Welsh Owain Glyndŵr (c.1359-c.1416), the last Welsh Prince of Wales, and a leader of the Welsh against the English. She was the only Royal Navy vessel to bear that name.
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1887 - The dutch Oceansteamer W. A. Scholten sunk after collision with a british coalfrighter. 132 of passengers and crew died.
W.A._Scholten_(schip,_1874-1878).jpg Stoomschip_de_W.A._Scholten,_1878.jpg

1941 – World War II: Battle between HMAS Sydney and HSK Kormoran. The two ships sink each other off the coast of Western Australia, with the loss of 645 Australians and about 77 German seamen.
The battle between the Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney and the German auxiliary cruiser Kormoran was a single ship action that occurred on 19 November 1941, off the coast of Western Australia. Sydney, with Captain Joseph Burnett commanding, and Kormoran, under Fregattenkapitän (Commander) Theodor Detmers, encountered each other approximately 106 nautical miles (196 km; 122 mi) off Dirk Hartog Island. Both ships were destroyed in the half-hour engagement.
From 24 November, after Sydney failed to return to port, air and sea searches were conducted. Boats and rafts carrying survivors from Kormoran were recovered at sea, while others made landfall north of Carnarvon: 318 of the 399 personnel on Kormoran survived. While debris from Sydney was found, there were no survivors from the 645-strong complement. It was the largest loss of life in the history of the Royal Australian Navy, the largest Allied warship lost with all hands during World War II, and a major blow to Australian wartime morale. Australian authorities learned of Sydney's fate from the surviving Kormoran personnel, who were held in prisoner of war camps until the end of the war. The exact location of the two wrecks remained unverified until 2008.
Bundesarchiv_Bild_146-1969-117-48,_Hilfskreuzer_Kormoran.jpg



2002 – The Greek oil tanker Prestige splits in half and sinks off the coast of Galicia, releasing over 20 million US gallons (76,000 m³) of oil in the largest environmental disaster in Spanish and Portuguese history.
The Prestige oil spill occurred off the coast of Galicia, Spain, caused by the sinking of the 26 year old structurally deficient oil tanker MV Prestige in November 2002, carrying 77,000 tonnes of heavy fuel oil. During a storm, it burst a tank on November 13, and sank on November 19, 2002, about 130 miles (210 km) from the coast of Galicia. It is estimated that it spilled 17.8 million US gallons (420,000 bbl) (or a mass of 60,000 metric tonnes) of heavy fuel oil. The spill polluted thousands of kilometers of coastline and more than one thousand beaches on the Spanish, French and Portuguese coast, as well as causing great harm to the local fishing industry. The spill is the largest environmental disaster in the history of both Spain and Portugal. The amount of oil spilled was more than the Exxon Valdez incident and the toxicity considered higher, because of the higher water temperatures.
xj2j6hnxgcwx.jpg


 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

20th of November

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events


1739 – Begin of Capture / Battle of Porto Bello between British and Spanish forces during the War of Jenkins' Ear.
The Battle of Porto Bello, or the Battle of Portobello, was a 1739 battle between a British naval force aiming to capture the settlement of Portobello in Panama, and its Spanish defenders. It took place during the War of the Austrian Succession, in the early stages of the war sometimes known as the War of Jenkins' Ear. It resulted in a popularly acclaimed British victory.
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1759 - Battle of Quiberon Bay/Cardinaux. British fleet of 23 ships of the line, under Admiral Sir Edward Hawke, defeated a French fleet of 21 ships of the line, under Marshal de Conflans, near St Nazaire. 6 French ships were taken and many others foundered or ran ashore.
The Battle of Quiberon Bay (known as Bataille des Cardinaux in French), was a decisive naval engagement fought on 20 November 1759 during the Seven Years' War between the Royal Navy and the French Navy. It was fought in Quiberon Bay, off the coast of France near St. Nazaire. The battle was the culmination of British efforts to eliminate French naval superiority, which could have given the French the ability to carry out their planned invasion of Great Britain. A British fleet of 24 ships of the line under Sir Edward Hawke tracked down and engaged a French fleet of 21 ships of the line under Marshal de Conflans. After hard fighting, the British fleet sank or ran aground six French ships, captured one and scattered the rest, giving the Royal Navy one of its greatest victories, and ending the threat of French invasion for good.
Quibcardinaux2.jpg

The Battle of Quiberon Bay, Nicholas Pocock, 1812. National Maritime Museum
1024px-Bataille-Cardinaux.jpg

Battle of Quiberon Bay: the Day After Richard Wright 1760

1786 – Launch of French Capricieuse, at Lorient – wrecked January 1800.

1790 – Launch of Spanish Intrépido, 74 gun San Ildefonso class at Ferrol - transferred to France 1 July 1801, renamed Intrépide, captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar and sank in storm, 1805
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1806 - Boats of HMS Success (1781 - 32), Cptn. John Ayscough, captured privateer felucca Le Vengeur, in Hidden Port near Cumberland Harbour, Cuba but she was sunk by fire from the shore.
HMS Success
was a 32-gun Amazon-class fifth-rate frigate of the British Royal Navy launched in 1781, which served during the American Revolutionary, French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. The French captured her in the Mediterranean on 13 February 1801, but she was recaptured by the British on 2 September. She continued to serve in the Mediterranean until 1811, and in North America until hulked in 1814, then serving as a prison ship and powder hulk, before being broken up in 1820.
HMS_Success_vs_Santa_Catalina.jpg


1820 – An 80-ton sperm whale attacks and sinks the Essex (a whaling ship from Nantucket, Massachusetts) 2,000 miles from the western coast of South America. (Herman Melville's 1851 novel Moby-Dick is in part inspired by this story.)
Essex was an American whaler from Nantucket, Massachusetts, which was launched in 1799. In 1820, while at sea in the southern Pacific Ocean under the command of Captain George Pollard Jr., she was attacked and sunk by a sperm whale. Stranded thousands of miles from the coast of South America with little food and water, the 20-man crew was forced to make for land in the ship's surviving whaleboats.
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1823 – Launch of HMS Rainbow, a 28 gun Atholl-class corvette
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1845 – Anglo-French blockade of the Río de la Plata: Battle of Vuelta de Obligado.
The naval Battle of Vuelta de Obligado took place on the waters of the Paraná River on 20 November 1845, between the Argentine Confederation, under the leadership of Juan Manuel de Rosas, and a combined Anglo-French fleet. The action was part of the larger Anglo-French blockade of the Río de la Plata. Although the attacking forces broke through the Argentine naval defenses and overran the land defenses, the battle proved that foreign ships could not safely navigate Argentine internal waters against its government's wishes. The battle also changed political feeling in South America, increasing support for Rosas and his government.
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1861 – Launch of The second USS Oneida was a screw sloop-of-war in the United States Navy.
The second USS Oneida was a screw sloop-of-war in the United States Navy. During the Civil War, she destroyed the CSS Governor Moore and served in blockade operations. She was attached to the Asiatic Squadron from 1867–1870. She sank in 1870 outside Yokohama, Japan after collision with the British steamer Bombay. The Court of Inquiry found the officers of Oneida were responsible for the collision. Bombay's captain was blamed for not staying at the scene to render assistance - a decision that caused some controversy] Japanese fishing boats saved 61 sailors but 125 men lost their lives. The American government made no attempt to raise the wreck and sold it to a Japanese wrecking company. The company recovered many bones from the wreck and interred them at their own expense. The Japanese erected a memorial tablet on the grounds of Ikegami Temple in Tokyo and held a Buddhist ceremony in the sailor's memory in May 1889.
USS Oeida.jpg


1861 – Launch of USS Housatonic, was a screw sloop-of-war of the United States Navy,
USS Housatonic
was a screw sloop-of-war of the United States Navy, gaining its namesake from the Housatonic River of New England.
Housatonic was launched on 20 November 1861, by the Boston Navy Yard at Charlestown, Massachusetts, sponsored by Miss Jane Coffin Colby and Miss Susan Paters Hudson; and commissioned there on 29 August 1862, with Commander William Rogers Taylor in command. Housatonic was one of four sister ships which included USS Adirondack, USS Ossipee, and USS Juniata. Housatonic is recognized as being the first ship sunk in combat by a submarine when she was attacked and sunk by H.L. Hunley in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina.
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Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

21st of November

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day ..... in the following you will find some of the events


1742 - sloop HMS Drake (1741 - 14) and several other ships like two fine Xebecs belonging to the King, three ships with stores for the garrison and a large Settee storeship, besides several Portuguese vessels lost in a violent storm in Gibraltar Bay
HMS Drake
was an 8-gun snow-rigged sloop of the Royal Navy, launched in 1741 as the first of three Drake class sloops constructed for convoy duty during the Anglo-Spanish War of Jenkins' Ear from 1739 to 1742. After limited service off the Channel Islands, she was sailed to Gibraltar where she was wrecked in 1742 while under the temporary command of her first lieutenant.
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1779 - HMS Hussar (1763 - 28), Cptn. Elliott Salter, took Nostra Senora del Buen Confegio (26).
HMS Hussar
was a sixth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy, built in England in 1761-63. She was a 28-gun ship of the Mermaid class, designed by Sir Thomas Slade. She was wrecked at New York in 1780.
In early 2013, a cannon from Hussar was discovered stored in a building in New York's Central Park still loaded with live gunpowder and shot
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1808 - HMS Dedaigneuse (1797 - 36), Cptn. William Beauchamp Proctor, engaged French frigate Semillante (1791 - 32) off Mauritius.
The Dédaigneuse was a 40-gun Coquille-class frigate of the French Navy, launched in 1797. The Royal Navy captured her in 1801 and took her into service as HMS Dedaigneuse. She was hulked as a receiving ship in 1812 and sold in 1823.
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1839 – Launch of French Inflexible, a 90-gun Suffren-class Ship of the line of the French Navy
The Inflexible was a 90-gun Suffren-class Ship of the line of the French Navy.
Commissioned in Rochefort in 1840, Inflexible was appointed to the Mediterranean squadron, where she served from 1841 under Captain Guérin des Essarts.
From 1860, she was used as a boys' school in Brest, and was eventually broken up in 1875
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Suffren-IMG_8649.JPG Suffren-IMG_8650.JPG Suffren-IMG_8651.JPG
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1910 – Sailors on board Brazil's warships including the Minas Geraes, São Paulo, and Bahia, violently rebel in what is now known as the Revolta da Chibata (Revolt of the Lash).
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1912 – Launch of Japanese battleship Hiei, a Kongo-class battleship
Hiei (比叡) was a warship of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I and World War II. Designed by British naval architect George Thurston, she was the second launched of four Kongō-class battlecruisers, among the most heavily armed ships in any navy when built. Laid down in 1911 at the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Hiei was formally commissioned in 1914. She patrolled off the Chinese coast on several occasions during World War I, and helped with rescue efforts following the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake.
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1916 – Mines from SM U-73 sink the HMHS Britannic, the largest ship lost in the First World War.
HMHS Britannic
(/brɪˈtænɪk/) was the third and final vessel of the White Star Line's Olympic class of steamships and the second to bear the name "Britannic." She was the fleet mate of both the RMS Olympic and the RMS Titanic and was intended to enter service as a transatlantic passenger liner.
Britannic was launched just before the start of the First World War. She was designed to be the safest and most luxurious of the three ships, drawing lessons from the sinking of the Titanic. She was laid up at her builders, Harland and Wolff, in Belfast for many months before being put to use as a hospital ship in 1915. In 1915 and 1916 she served between the United Kingdom and the Dardanelles. On the morning of 21 November 1916 she was shaken by an explosion caused by a naval mine near the Greek island of Kea and foundered 55 minutes later, killing 30 people.
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1921 - The Carrier Dove was a 4-masted schooner built by the Hall Brothers in Port Blakely in 1890 wrecked
The Carrier Dove was a 4-masted schooner built by the Hall Brothers in Port Blakely in 1890. She worked in the West coast lumber trade and in fishing
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1944 – World War II: American submarine USS Sealion (SS 315) sinks the Japanese battleship Kongō and Japanese destroyer Urakaze in the Formosa Strait.
Kongō (金剛, "Indestructible Diamond", named for Mount Kongō) was a warship of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I and World War II. She was the first battlecruiser of the Kongō class, among the most heavily armed ships in any navy when built. Her designer was the British naval engineer George Thurston, and she was laid down in 1911 at Barrow-in-Furness in Britain by Vickers Shipbuilding Company. Kongō was the last Japanese capital ship constructed outside Japan. She was formally commissioned in 1913, and patrolled off the Chinese coast during World War I.
Kongō fought in a large number of major naval actions of the Pacific War during World War II. She covered the Japanese Army's amphibious landings in British Malaya (part of present-day Malaysia) and the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) in 1942, before engaging American forces at the Battle of Midway and during the Guadalcanal Campaign. Throughout 1943, Kongō primarily remained at Truk Lagoon in the Caroline Islands, Kure Naval Base (near Hiroshima), Sasebo Naval Base (near Nagasaki), and Lingga Roads, and deployed several times in response to American aircraft carrier air raids on Japanese island bases scattered across the Pacific. Kongō participated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea and the Battle of Leyte Gulf in 1944 (22–23 October), engaging and sinking American vessels in the latter. Kongō was torpedoed and sunk by the submarine USS Sealion while transiting the Formosa Strait on 21 November 1944. She was the only Japanese battleship sunk by submarine in the Second World War.
Kongo_after_reconstruction.jpg
 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

22nd of November

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1643 – Birth of René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, French-American explorer (d. 1687)
René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle
, or Robert de La Salle (November 22, 1643 – March 19, 1687) was a French explorer. He explored the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada, the Mississippi River, and the Gulf of Mexico. He claimed the entire Mississippi River basin for France.
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1718 – Off the coast of North Carolina, British pirate Edward Teach (best known as "Blackbeard") is killed in battle with a boarding party led by Royal Navy Lieutenant Robert Maynard.
- Death of Edward Teach - better known as Blackbeard
Edward Teach
or Edward Thatch (c. 1680 – 22 November 1718), better known as Blackbeard, was an English pirate who operated around the West Indies and the eastern coast of Britain's North American colonies. Little is known about his early life, but he may have been a sailor on privateer ships during Queen Anne's War before settling on the Bahamian island of New Providence, a base for Captain Benjamin Hornigold, whose crew Teach joined around 1716. Hornigold placed him in command of a sloop that he had captured, and the two engaged in numerous acts of piracy. Their numbers were boosted by the addition to their fleet of two more ships, one of which was commanded by Stede Bonnet; but Hornigold retired from piracy towards the end of 1717, taking two vessels with him.
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1744 – Launch of French Magnanime, 74 at Rochefort, designed by Blaise Geslain – captured by the British in January 1748 and added to the RN under the same name, BU 1775
The Magnanime was originally a 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy launched in 1744 at Rochefort. Captured on 12 January 1748, she was taken into Royal Navy service as the third rate HMS Magnanime. She played a major part in the 1757 Rochefort expedition, helping to silence the batteries on the Isle of Aix, and served at the Battle of Quiberon Bay in 1759 under Lord Howe, where she forced the surrender of the French 74-gun Héros. Following a survey in 1770, she was deemed unseaworthy and was broken up in 1775.
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1786 – Launch of HMS Saturn, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Northam
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1790 – Launch of british Woodford, an East Indiaman of the British East India Company (EIC)
Woodford was launched in 1790 and made nine voyages as an East Indiaman for the British East India Company (EIC). In 1797 her captain was commodore of a small group of East Indiamen that managed to bluff a French squadron of warships into sailing away to avoid an engagement. In 1812 Woodford was sold for breaking up.
Woodford.JPG



1847 - Steamship Phoenix burned down to waterline on Lake Michigan with the loss of at least 190 but perhaps as many as 250 lives.
The loss of life made this disaster, in terms of loss of life from the sinking of a single vessel, the fourth-worst tragedy in the history of the Great Lakes.
Steamship_Phoenix.jpg



1869 – In Dumbarton, Scotland, the clipper Cutty Sark is launched and is one of the last clippers ever built, and the only one still surviving today.
Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship. Built on the River Clyde in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development, which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion.
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Cutty_Sark_(ship,_1869)_-_SLV_H91.250-164.jpg

Cutty Sark with sails set. Photograph taken at sea by Captain Woodget with a camera balanced on two of the ship's boats lashed together.


1858 – Launch of USS Hartford, a sloop-of-war, steamer,
The USS Hartford, a sloop-of-war, steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy named for Hartford, the capital of Connecticut. Hartford served in several prominent campaigns in the American Civil War as the flagship of David G. Farragut, most notably the Battle of Mobile Bay in 1864. She survived until 1956, when she sank awaiting restoration at Norfolk, Virginia.
USS_Hartford_(1858).jpg


1873 – The French steamer SS Ville du Havre sinks in 12 minutes after colliding with the Scottish iron clipper Loch Earn in the Atlantic, with a loss of 226 lives.
Ville du Havre was a French iron steamship that operated round trips between the northern coast of France and New York City. Launched in November 1865 under her original name of Napoléon III, she was converted from a paddle steamer to single propeller propulsion in 1871 and, in recognition of the recent defeat of her imperial namesake, the Emperor Napoleon III, was renamed Ville du Havre.
Ville_du_Havre.jpg

In the early hours of 22 November 1873, Ville du Havre collided with the Scottish three-masted iron clipper, Loch Earn and sank in 12 minutes with the loss of 226 lives. Only 61 passengers and 26 crew members survived, rescued by Loch Earn and subsequently, an American vessel, Tremountain.
ville_du_havre_loch_earn_1873.jpg
 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

23rd of November

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1703 - HMS York (1653/1654 - 54), Cptn. Smith, lost off the Shipwash, Harwich
Marston Moor was a 52-gun third rate Speaker-class frigate built for the navy of the Commonwealth of England at Blackwall Yard, and launched in 1654.
After the Restoration in 1660, she was renamed HMS York. By 1677 her armament had been increased to 60 guns. York ran aground and was wrecked in 1703.
york_1654.jpg



1757 - HMS Hussar (1757 - 28) and HMS Dolphin (1751 - 24) destroyed french Alcyon (1726 - 50)
Action on 23 November 1757

British 28-gun ship Hussar, Captain John Elliot, and 24-gun ship Dolphin, Captain Benjamin Mario w, being on a cruize, gave chase to a large French ship. The Hussar closed with her at about 8h. p.m., and commenced the action, in which she was soon joined by the Dolphin. The fire of the British ships must have been well directed, for at 10h. p.m. the stranger, which was by that time dismasted, went down with her colours flying. The French ship was supposed to have been the Alcyon, of 50 guns, armed en flute. The Hussar had received much injury, and had no boat that would swim; the Dolphin, however, sent a boat, but was, unfortunately, not able to save any of the devoted French crew.
HMS_Dolphin_1751.jpg



1757 – french Abénakise (1756) was captured by the British Navy on the Atlantic Ocean
renamed HMS Aurora in British service - The british Mermaid-class frigates designed in 1760 by Sir Thomas Slade, were based on the scaled-down lines of HMS Aurora

Abénaquise (or Abenakise) was a 36-gun ship of the French Navy of the Ancien Régime, designed by René-Nicholas Lavasseur and launched on 8 July 1757. She was commanded by captain Gabriel Pellegrin. In 1757 she crossed the Atlantic Ocean in 38 days. This was one of the fastest crossings from Brest to Petite ferme on the La Côte-de-Beaupré with pilot Pellegrin, port captain of Quebec, who was on his forty-second crossing.
Captured by the Royal Navy in 1757, she was renamed HMS Aurora and saw active service in the latter half of the Seven Years' War. She was broken up for timber at Plymouth Dockyard in 1763.
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1791 - Snares Islands/Tini Heke, also known as The Snares, were sighted first time independently at the same day by the two ships HMS Discovery under Captain George Vancouver, and HMS Chatham commanded by Lieutenant William R. Broughton,
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1820 – Launch of HMS Atholl and HMS Niemen, both Atholl class corvettes at the same day at Woolwich Dockyards
The Atholl-class corvettes were a series of fourteen Royal Navy sailing sixth-rate post ships built to an 1817 design by the Surveyors of the Navy. A further four ships ordered to this design were cancelled.
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1822 - USS Alligator, Lt. Robert F Stockton, set on fire and blew up after beeing stranded on Carysford Reef, off Florida
The third USS Alligator was a schooner in the United States Navy.
Alligator was laid down on 26 June 1820 by the Boston Navy Yard; launched on 2 November 1820; and commissioned in March 1821 — probably on the 26th — with Lieutenant Robert F. Stockton in command. On 6 June 1996, the site of its wreck was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.
USS_Alligator.jpg


1838 - The sloop-of-war USS Vincennes reaches Rio de Janeiro en route to the South Pacific during the U.S. Exploring Expedition.
USS Vincennes (1826)
was a 703-ton Boston-class sloop of war in the United States Navy from 1826 to 1865. During her service, Vincennes patrolled the Pacific, explored the Antarctic, and blockaded the Confederate Gulf coast in the Civil War. Named for the Revolutionary War Battle of Vincennes, she was the first U.S. warship to circumnavigate the globe.
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1939 – World War II: HMS Rawalpindi is sunk by the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau.
HMS Rawalpindi
was a British armed merchant cruiser, (a converted passenger ship intended to raid and sink enemy merchant shipping) that was sunk in a surface action against the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau during the first months of the Second World War. Her captain was Edward Coverley Kennedy.
HMS_Rawalpindi_(MOD_381).jpg



1943 - USS Liscome Bay (ACV/CVE-56), a Casablanca-class escort carrier sunk by Japanese submarine
USS Liscome Bay (ACV/CVE-56)
, a Casablanca-class escort carrier during World War II, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Liscome Bay in Dall Island in the Alexander Archipelago of Alaska. She was lost to a submarine attack by Japanese submarine I-175 during Operation Galvanic, with a catastrophic loss of life, on 24 November 1943.
USS_Liscome_Bay_CVE56.jpg



2007 – MS Explorer, a cruise liner carrying 154 people, sinks in the Antarctic Ocean south of Argentina after hitting an iceberg near the South Shetland Islands. There are no fatalities.
MS Explorer
was a Liberian-registered cruise ship designed for Arctic and Antarctic service, originally commissioned and operated by the Swedish explorer Lars-Eric Lindblad. Observers point to Explorer's 1969 expeditionary cruise to Antarctica as the forerunner for today's sea-based tourism in that region.
The vessel was originally named MS Lindblad Explorer (until 1985), and MS Society Explorer until 1992. Ownership of the vessel changed several times, the last owner being the Toronto-based travel company G.A.P Adventures which acquired Explorer in 2004.
Explorer-sinking-2.jpg


 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

24th of November

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1642 – Abel Tasman becomes the first European to discover the island Van Diemen's Land (later renamed Tasmania).
On 24 November 1642 Abel Tasman reached and sighted the west coast of Tasmania, north of Macquarie Harbour. He named his discovery Van Diemen's Land after Antonio van Diemen, Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies.
1280px-Coastal-cliffs_Tasman-peninsula.jpg
Coastal cliffs of Tasman Peninsula

1720 - HMS Monck (1659 - 60), Cptn. Hon. George Clinton, wrecked in Yarmouth Roads.
HMS Monck
was a 52-gun third rate frigate built for the navy of the Commonwealth of England at Portsmouth, and launched in 1659. She retained her name after the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660. By 1677 her armament had been increased to 60 guns.
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An incident during King William's War (War of the English Succession), sparked off by the Glorious Revolution of 1688 when Catholic James II fled the country after William of Orange landed at Torbay. ...... In the right foreground is the squadron under Shovell, as Rear-Admiral of the Blue, with his flagship, the ‘Monck’, flying blue at the mizzen.


1797 – Launch of French Spartiate, a 74 gun Téméraire-class ship of the line at Toulon
– Captured by the British in the Battle of the Nile in August 1798 and added to the RN under the same name, BU 1857.
The Spartiate was originally a French 74-gun ship of the line, launched in 1797. In 1798, she took part in the Battle of the Nile, where she became one of the nine ships captured by the Royal Navy.
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1804 - HMS Venerable (1784 -74), Cptn. John Hunter, wrecked on the Rocks off Roundham Head, Torbay.
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The Battle of Camperdown, 11 October 1797 by Thomas Whitcombe, painted 1798, showing the British flagship Venerable (flying the Blue Ensign from her stern) engaged with the Dutch flagship Vrijheid.

1807 - Hired armed brig HMS Ann captured a privateer and two gunboats.
There were two, and possibly three, vessels named His Majesty's hired armed brig Ann (or Anne) that served the British Royal Navy. The first participated in an engagement in 1807 that would earn her crew the Naval General Service Medal. She is sometimes referred to in sources as the hired armed cutter Ann or the hired armed brig Anne. Little or nothing is known of the second and third hired armed brigs Ann or Anne.

1812 - Sloop HMS Belette (1806 - 18), David Sloane, wrecked on rocks off Island of Lessoe, in the Kattegat.
HMS Belette
(or Bellette) was an 18-gun Cruizer-class brig-sloop, built by King at Dover and launched on 21 March 1806. During the Napoleonic Wars she served with some success in the Baltic and the Caribbean. Belette was lost in the Kattegat in 1812 when she hit a rock off Læsø.
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1814 - Sloop HMS Fantôme (1810 - 18), John Lawrence, wrecked on rocks near Prospect Harbour, Nova Scotia.
HMS Fantome
was an 18-gun brig-sloop of the Royal Navy. She was originally a French privateer brig named Fantôme, which the British captured in 1810 and commissioned into British service. Fantome saw extensive action in the War of 1812 until she was lost in a shipwreck at Prospect, Nova Scotia, near Halifax in 1814.
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1877 - While en route to Cuba to collect scientific information, the screw steam gunboat USS Huron wrecks in a storm near Nag's Head, N.C. The crew attempts to free their ship but it soon heels over, killing 98 officers and men.
USS Huron
was an iron-hulled gunboat of the United States Navy. She was a screw steamer with full-rig auxiliary sail, built by John Roach & Sons in Chester, Pennsylvania from 1873–75 and commissioned at Philadelphia Navy Yard on 15 November 1875, with Commander George P. Ryan in command.
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1941 - HMS Dunedin was a Danae-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy, sunk by U-124
HMS Dunedin
was a Danae-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy, pennant number D93. She was launched from the yards of Armstrong Whitworth, Newcastle-on-Tyne on 19 November 1918 and commissioned on 13 September 1919. She has been the only ship of the Royal Navy to bear the name Dunedin (named for the capital of Scotland, generally Anglicised as Edinburgh).
StateLibQld_1_149299_Dunedin_(ship).jpg
 

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25th of November

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1120 – The White Ship sinks in the English Channel, drowning William Adelin, son and heir of Henry I of England.
The White Ship (real name: French: la Blanche-Nef, Latin documents Latin: Candida navis) was a vessel that sank in the English Channel near the Normandy coast off Barfleur, on 25 November 1120. Only one of those aboard survived. Those who drowned included William Adelin, the only legitimate son and heir of King Henry I of England, his half-sister Matilda, his half-brother Richard and also Richard d'Avranches, 2nd Earl of Chester. William Adelin's death led to a succession crisis and a period of civil war in England known as the Anarchy.
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1577 – Birth of Piet Pieterszoon Hein, Dutch admiral (d. 1629)
Pieter Pietersen Heyn (Hein)
(25 November 1577 – 18 June 1629) was a Dutch admiral and privateer for the Dutch Republic during the Eighty Years' War between the United Provincesand Spain. Hein was the first and the last to capture a large part of a Spanish "silver fleet" from America.
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1757 - HMS Augusta (60), Cptn. Arthur Forrest, took french Le Mars (32) and nine armed merchantmen – also known as Raid on Leogane Bay
HMS Augusta
was a 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built to the 1733 proposals of the 1719 Establishment at Deptford Dockyard, and launched on 1 July 1736.
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1791 – Launch of French Sémillante, 32 guns at Lorient – sold in September 1808 for commercial use.
The Sémillante (French: "Shiny" or "Sparkling") was a 32-gun frigate of the French Navy, lead ship of her class. She was involved in a number of multi-vessel actions against the Royal Navy, particularly in the Indian Ocean. She captured a number of East Indiamen before she became so damaged that the French disarmed her and turned her into a merchant vessel. The British captured her and broke her up in 1809.
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1826 – The Greek frigate Hellas arrives in Nafplion to become the first flagship of the Hellenic Navy.
The Greek frigate Hellas (Greek: Ελλάς) was the flagship of the Revolutionary Hellenic Navy. After an arbitration hearing in New York due to financial default by the Greek government, she was delivered to Greece in 1826. She was burned in 1831 by the Greek Admiral Andreas Miaoulis when the government of Ioannis Kapodistrias ordered her turned over to the Russian navy.
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1839 - HMS Pelorus was an 18-gun Cruizer-class brig-sloop of the British Royal Navy wrecked
HMS Pelorus
was an 18-gun Cruizer-class brig-sloop of the British Royal Navy. She was built in Itchenor, England and launched on 25 June 1808. She saw action in the Napoleonic Wars and in the War of 1812. On anti-slavery patrol off West Africa, she captured four slavers and freed some 1350 slaves. She charted parts of Australia and New Zealand and participated in the First Opium War (1839–1842) before becoming a merchantman and wrecking in 1844 while transporting opium to China.
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1872 - Royal Adelaide, iron-built emigrant clipper, wrecked on the Chesil and looted
The Royal Adelaide was an iron sailing ship of 1400 tons built by William Patterson at Bristol in 1865.
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1941 – HMS Barham is sunk by a German torpedo during World War II.
HMS Barham
was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Often used as a flagship, she participated in the Battle of Jutland during the First World War as part of the Grand Fleet. For the rest of the First World War, except for the inconclusive Action of 19 August 1916, her service during the war generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea.
HMS_Barham_(1914).jpg
 

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

26th of November

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1161 – Battle of Caishi: A Song dynasty fleet fights a naval engagement with Jin dynasty ships on the Yangtze river during the Jin–Song Wars.
The Battle of Caishi (Battle of Ts'ai-shih; Chinese: 采石之戰) was a major naval engagement of the Jin–Song Wars of China that took place on November 26–27, 1161. Soldiers under the command of Wanyan Liang, the Jurchen emperor of the Jin dynasty, tried to cross the Yangtze River to attack Song China. Yu Yunwen, a civil official, commanded the defending Song army. The paddle-wheel warships of the Song fleet, equipped with trebuchets that launched incendiary bombs made of gunpowder and lime, decisively defeated the light ships of the Jin navy.
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1703 - Great Storm of 1703 - The Royal Navy was badly affected, losing thirteen ships including the entire Channel Squadron
The Great Storm of 1703 was a destructive extratropical cyclone that struck central and southern England on 26 November 1703 (7 December 1703 in the Gregorian calendar in use today). High winds caused 2,000 chimney stacks to collapse in London and damaged the New Forest, which lost 4,000 oaks. Ships were blown hundreds of miles off-course, and over 1,000 seamen died on the Goodwin Sands alone. News bulletins of casualties and damage were sold all over England – a novelty at that time. The Church of England declared that the storm was God’s vengeance for the sins of the nation. Daniel Defoe thought it was a divine punishment for poor performance against Catholic armies in the War of the Spanish Succession.
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Naval losses
In the English Channel, fierce winds and high seas swamped some vessels outright and drove others onto the Goodwin Sands, an extensive sand bank off the southeast coast of England and the traditional anchorage for ships waiting either for passage up the Thames Estuary to London or for favourable winds to take them out into the Channel and the Atlantic Ocean. The Royal Navy was badly affected, losing thirteen ships including the entire Channel Squadron, and upwards of 1,500 seamen drowned.
  • The third-rate HMS Restoration was wrecked on the Goodwin Sands; of the ship's company of 387 not one was saved.
  • The third-rate HMS Northumberland was lost on the Goodwin Sands; all 220 men, including 24 marines were killed.
  • The third-rate (battleship) HMS Stirling Castle was wrecked on the Goodwin Sands. Seventy men, including four marine officers, were saved, but 206 men were drowned.
  • The fourth-rate HMS Mary was wrecked on the Goodwin Sands. The captain and the purser were ashore, but Rear Admiral Beaumont and 268 other men were drowned. Only one man, Thomas Atkins, was saved. His escape was remarkable – having first seen the rear admiral get onto a piece of her quarter-deck when the ship was breaking up, and then get washed off again, Atkins was tossed by a wave into the Stirling Castle, which sank soon after. From the Stirling Castle he was swept into a boat by a wave, and was rescued.
  • The fifth-rate Mortar-bomb was wrecked on the Goodwin Sands and her entire company of 65 lost.
  • The sixth-rate advice boat Eagle was lost on the coast of Sussex, but her ship's company of 45 were all saved.
  • The third-rate Resolution was lost at Pevensey on the coast of Sussex; all her ship's company of 221 were saved.
  • The fifth-rate Litchfield Prize was wrecked on the coast of Sussex; all 108 on board were saved.
  • The fourth-rate Newcastle was lost at Spithead. The carpenter and 39 men were saved, and the other 193 were drowned.
  • The fifth-rate fire-ship Vesuvius was lost at Spithead; all 48 of her ship's company were saved.
  • The fourth-rate Reserve was lost by foundering off Yarmouth. The captain, the surgeon, the clerk and 44 men were saved; the other 175 members of the crew were drowned.
  • The second-rate Vanguard was sunk in Chatham harbour. She was not manned and had no armament fitted; the following year she was raised for rebuilding.
  • The fourth-rate York was lost at Harwich; all but four of her men were saved.
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Lamb (1991) claimed 10,000 seamen were lost in one night, a far higher figure, about one third of the seamen in the Royal Navy.
Daniel Defoe's book The Storm suggests that the Royal Navy lost one fifth of its ships which would however indicate a much lower proportion of seamen were lost, as some wrecked sailors survived.
Shrewsbury narrowly escaped a similar fate. More than 40 merchant ships were also lost.


1776 – Launch of HMS Ruby, a 64-gun Intrepid-class third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS Ruby
was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 26 November 1776 at Woolwich.
She was converted to serve as a receiving ship in 1813, and was broken up in 1821.
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1787 - Launch of HMS Captain, a 74-gun Canada class third-rate ship of the line at Limehouse
HMS Captain
was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 26 November 1787 at Limehouse. She served during the French revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars before being placed in harbour service in 1799. An accident caused her to burn and founder in 1813. Later that year she was raised and broken up.
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1795 – Launch of Spanish Neptuno, an 80-gun Montañes-class ship of the line at Ferrol - Wrecked in storm after the Battle of Trafalgar, 23 October 1805
Neptuno was an 80-gun Montañes-class ship of the line of the Spanish Navy. She was built in 1795 and took part in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. She fought with the Franco-Spanish fleet in the battle of Trafalgar, and was wrecked in its aftermath.
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Plan showing the body plan, sheer lines with inboard detail, and longitudinal half-breadth for 'Neptuno' (1795) and 'Argonauta' (1798), both Spanish 80-gun two-decker.

1847 - Lt. William Lynch, in the ship-rigged sailing vessel USS Supply, sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea.
The first USS Supply was a ship-rigged sailing vessel which served as a stores ship in the United States Navy. She saw service in the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War.
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1865 – Battle of Papudo: A Spanish navy schooner is defeated by a Chilean corvette north of Valparaíso, Chile.
The Naval Battle of Papudo was a naval engagement fought between Spanish and Chilean forces on November 26, 1865, during the Chincha Islands War. It was fought 55 miles north of Valparaiso, Chile, near the coastal town of Papudo.
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1870 – Launch of RMS Atlantic, passenger ship for White Star Line
RMS Atlantic
was a transatlantic ocean liner of the White Star Line that operated between Liverpool, United Kingdom, and New York City, United States. During the ship's 19th voyage, on 1 April 1873, she ran onto rocks and sank off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, killing at least 535 people. It remained the deadliest civilian maritime disaster in the North Atlantic Ocean until the sinking of SS La Bourgogne on 2 July 1898 and the greatest disaster for the White Star Line prior to the loss of Titanic in April 1912.
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Wreck of Atlantic during body and cargo recovery, April 1873

1898 - The Portland Gale - the loss of SS Portland
was a storm that struck the coast of New England on November 26 and 27, 1898. The storm formed when two low pressure areas merged off the coast of Virginia and travelled up the coast; at its peak, it produced a storm surge of about ten feet in Cohasset harbor and hurricane-force winds in Nantucket. The storm killed more than 400 people and sank more than 150 boats and ships. It also changed the course of the North River, separating the Humarock portion of Scituate, Massachusetts, from the rest of Scituate.
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Portland, drawn in 1895 by Samuel Ward Stanton, who died on the Titanic.

1914 - HMS Bulwark, pre-dreadnought battleships, destroyed by internal explosion
HMS Bulwark
belonged to a sub-class of the Formidable-class of pre-dreadnought battleships of the Royal Navy known as the London class. Entering service with the Royal Navy in 1902, she sailed with the Mediterranean Fleet until 1907. She then served with the Home Fleet, for a time under Captain Robert Falcon Scott. After a refit in 1912, she was assigned to the 5th Battle Squadron.
Following the outbreak of the First World War, Bulwark, along with the rest of the squadron, was attached to the Channel Fleet, conducting patrols in the English Channel. On 26 November 1914, while anchored near Sheerness, she was destroyed by a large internal explosion with the loss of 736 men. There were only 14 survivors of the explosion and of these 2 died later in hospital. The explosion was likely to have been caused by the overheating of cordite charges that had been placed adjacent to a boiler room bulkhead.
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1941 - Under the greatest secrecy, the Japanese armada, commanded by Vice Adm. Chuichi Nagumo, leaves Japan to attack the U.S. Navy at Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941
On November 26, 1941, a Japanese task force (the Striking Force) of six aircraft carriers—Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū, Hiryū, Shōkaku, and Zuikaku—departed Hittokapu Bay on Kasatka (now Iterup) Island in the Kurile Islands, en route to a position northwest of Hawaii, intending to launch its 408 aircraft to attack Pearl Harbor: 360 for the two attack waves and 48 on defensive combat air patrol (CAP), including nine fighters from the first wave.
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Route followed by the Japanese fleet to Pearl Harbor and back

1943 – World War II: HMT Rohna is sunk by the Luftwaffe in an air attack in the Mediterranean north of Béjaïa, Algeria.
HMT Rohna
was a British India Steam Navigation Company passenger and cargo liner that was built on Tyneside in 1926 as SS Rohna and requisitioned as a troop ship in 1940. ("HMT" stands for His Majesty's Transport.) Rohna was sunk in the Mediterranean in November 1943 by a Henschel Hs 293 guided glide bomb launched by a Luftwaffe aircraft. More than 1,100 people were killed, most of whom were US troops.
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