Book review Book Review: "SHIP MODELS FROM KITS: Basic and Advanced Techniques for Small Scales" by David Griffith

Uwek

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Book Review:
Ship Models from Kits: Basic and Advanced Techniques for Small Scales
by David Griffith

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  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press (February 2011), Seaforth Publishing (30 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 0.5 x 9.5 inches, 18.4 x 1.3 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces

Synopsis:

In the past thirty years the world of model kits has undergone a veritable revolution. New techniques in injection moulding have improved the scale accuracy and surface detail of the humble plastic kit, while many specialist companies now produce top-quality resin models, vastly broadening the range of subjects on the market. However, the really radical change has been the advent of photo-etched brass fret, which allows the finest detail to be reproduced to scale. In ship modelling, this has resulted in a new form of the hobby, mid-way between traditional build-from-the-box simplicity and the time-consuming demands of fabricating everything from scratch.

These new materials have prompted innovative techniques, which are comprehensively demonstrated in this new manual. Designed for those wishing to achieve the best results from their ship kits in the 1:700 to 1:350 range of scales, it uses step by step photographs to take the reader through the building of two models, one in plastic and one in resin, from basic construction, fittings and detailing, to painting, finishing and display.

Written by a highly experienced, award-winning ship modeller, the book is a showcase for the contemporary approach to the hobby.

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About the Author:

The Author is one of the best builders of model ships kits in the UK. David Griffith builds models in many scales and materials, but has won many awards for his 1:350 and 1:700 scale resin warships. He publishes his own newsletter.
Some of his models: http://www.modelshipgallery.com/gallery/users/David-Griffith/user-index.html

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Contents:

Introduction, A Note on Photographs
1) What's on the Market
2) References and Resources
3) Tools, Techniques and Materials
4) Basic Construction: Plastic Models
5) Basic Construction: Resin Models
6) Adding Detail to Smaller Parts
7) Bringing it all Together
8) Painting and Weathering
9) Rigging
10) Setting the Scene - Bases and Dioramas
11) Model Gallery
Appendix: Dealers and Suppliers

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Review:

Due to the fact, that I never built such a model in 1:350 or even 1:700 I am not realy a specialist to comment or review in detail this book. As a pure "beginner" I would resume this book as a great source with a lot of hints and tips and photos of stunning models.
I checked the reviews on amazon and they are describing the book as a great helpful masterpiece (95% of the reviews)

I copy here the review by Bill Hensler from amazon: One of the best source books I´ve bought

I build ship models and this book is second to none on the construction of ships. The author covers the two most popular scales of 1/700 and 1/350th scale in debth. He covers everything from correcting the mistakes found on ship models, informing the reader when it's worth it or not to correct some mistakes, how to paint, do the water, and then the author spends a lot of time on the rigging of the ship. I bought the book for the rigging information because nothing brings a ship alive like rigging. But the author covers everything from photo-etch railings & parts to scratch builds. The author even gives airbrush advice and this reader is one of the last people who uses a brush and spray can.

The author has several of his award winning models as photo subjects. Stunning is the best word to describe every one of his builds. What is really interesting is while the author is from the U.K. the models built are very extensive going from a USN Independence class aircraft carrier to a French Pre-Dreadnought to the British Dreadnoughts, cruisers, and Destroyers. I found nothing to fault in this book.

This book makes the Fine Scale Modeler books that Mike Ashley made in the 1990s obsolete (I blog at Steelnavy & Model Warships and hate seeing the work of Mike get dated). So, if you're a ship modeler you can't go wrong. If you're getting into the hobby for the first time you're doing the correct thing by buying this book.

This book is five stars, totally necessary for the hobby, and you'll get lots of instruction in making a realistic and nice looking model ship.

steelnavy (dot) com swear that this book is one of the best book ever done for the ship modeler. I totally agree.
http://www.steelnavy.com/ShipModelsFromKits.htm

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More Look Inside photos you can find in the next post
 

Uwek

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Part 2 of Book Review:
Ship Models from Kits: Basic and Advanced Techniques for Small Scales
by David Griffith

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