File for laser cut

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I have a plan on jpeg format. I sent to the shop for laser cut but suggested me that the files should be CAD suitable so he can work with it. Is it possible to do it myself or need to find someone specialised?
Thanks
 

Jimsky

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Hello Mikegr, My big guess, your question is the answer. In order to laser cut the bulkheads, a basic drawing has to be converted to a 3D model. This required working with CAD as well as specialized CAD software. We have Kris with the nick @SZKUTNIK, you can PM him with the question. He specializes in design work for laser-cut.
 
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Hello Mikegr, My big guess, your question is the answer. In order to laser cut the bulkheads, a basic drawing has to be converted to a 3D model. This required working with CAD as well as specialized CAD software. We have Kris with the nick @SZKUTNIK, you can PM him with the question. He specializes in design work for laser-cut.
As I understand it jpeg are pixels, points unjoined, and CAD programs need vectors which are lines between points to direct the action. The same problem arises in screen and banner print shops who require software files that they can work with. I don't know how you could convert a pixel file into a vector file. Maybe someone else does. PT-2
 
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found this free....

but now we are getting some where. So now I will start to learn freecad

Thank you very much to all that have contributed to enlarging my horizon.:):)
 
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found this free....

but now we are getting some where. So now I will start to learn freecad

Thank you very much to all that have contributed to enlarging my horizon.:):)
From what I research so far jpg to vector is the right approach. Now let's see how we do it.
 
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Ahoy!

@mikegr - if you have a problem with converting images to the vectors, we can help you. We can prepare plans for laser. No problem.

Also we can cut elements with a laser.

I don't know what exactly is on your plans. If necessary, it may be better to cut the details on the CNC milling machine. You will get finished details without burnt edges. This is very useful, for example, when you building POF models.
We make elements with solid wood, not plywood. Almost like LEGO blocks. It only remains to stick parts together :)

j1.jpg
j5.jpg
j2.jpg
j6.jpg
j3.jpg
j4.jpg

Kris
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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you take the JPEG and import it into a drawing program like this and you trace it now you have a vector file you can edit or scale that is the blue drawing, next export it as a DXF this file can be imported into any number of drawing programs also a laser can read the file.
Because there is no scale on the drawing it would have to be scaled to the cutting size. If you need all the parts traced let me know

so down load the DXF and give that to the laser cutter

parts.JPG
 

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Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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pick any drawing software and watch a lot of you tube on using it.
in time you pick up on how to do it and apply it.

there use to be either kit building or scratch building now with the advancements in cad design and custom cutting and printing serves there is another way semi-scratch building where you design your own kit and send out the laser cutting and 3D printing and wood milling. You pick the subject you want to model, select your wood have it milled and have fittings custom made to order.
any drawings or images you find either hard copy or on the net you can convert to your very own personal custom made kit.
 

Jimsky

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there use to be either kit building or scratch building now with the advancements in cad design and custom cutting and printing serves there is another way semi-scratch building where you design your own kit and send out the laser cutting and 3D printing and wood milling. You pick the subject you want to model, select your wood have it milled and have fittings custom made to order.
any drawings or images you find either hard copy or on the net you can convert to your very own personal custom made kit.
I would still consider this a scratch build! You design your own 'kit', you cut them using either CNC or laser cutter. If you don't have the equipment to cut, you can source it somewhere. you can design your own 3D printer parts, and print them out or ask someone to print for you. All the actions still considered as scratch. Why would you call it semi-scratch, Dave? What would be the part not considered as scratch?
 
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I would still consider this a scratch build! You design your own 'kit', you cut them using either CNC or laser cutter. If you don't have the equipment to cut, you can source it somewhere. you can design your own 3D printer parts, and print them out or ask someone to print for you. All the actions still considered as scratch. Why would you call it semi-scratch, Dave? What would be the part not considered as scratch?
Chipping in from the side . . . to me scratch would be just that. . . what I can or could produce with MY OWN hands and skill and not outsourced. Maybe extreme view of a newbie who has not done a "scratch" build butt had a kit in some form to build from. PT-2 (Rich)
 
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