HMS Agamemnon (1781 - 1809) / 64 gun Ship of the Line / Ardent class

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HMS Agamemnon (1781 - 1809) / 64 gun Ship of the Line / Ardent class

HMS Agamemnon was a 64-gun third-rate ship of the line of the British Royal Navy. She saw service in the Anglo-French War, French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and fought in many of the major naval battles of those conflicts. She is remembered as being Nelson's favourite ship, and was named after the mythical ancient Greek king Agamemnon, being the first ship of the Royal Navy to bear the name.
The future Lord Nelson served as Agamemnon's captain from January 1793 for 3 years and 3 months, during which time she saw considerable service in the Mediterranean. After Nelson's departure, she was involved in the infamous 1797 mutinies at Spithead and the Nore, and in 1801 was present at the first Battle of Copenhagen, but ran aground before being able to enter the action.
Despite Nelson's fondness for the ship, she was frequently in need of repair and refitting, and would likely have been hulked or scrapped in 1802 had war with France not recommenced. She fought at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October 1805, as part of Nelson's weather column, where she forced the surrender of the Spanish four-decker Santísima Trinidad. Agamemnon's later career was served in South American waters off Brazil.
Her worn-out and poor condition contributed to her being wrecked when in June 1809 she grounded on an uncharted shoal in the mouth of the River Plate, whilst seeking shelter with the rest of her squadron from a storm. All hands and most of the ship's stores were saved, but the condition of the ship's timbers made it impossible to free the ship; her captain was cleared of responsibility for the ship's loss thanks to documents detailing her defects. Recently, the wreck of Agamemnon has been located, and several artefacts have been recovered, including one of her cannons.

AX+I+4+HMS+Agamemnon+1781.jpg
Print of Agamamnon 1781 by http://www.hughevelynprints.com/ship-fleet/hms-agamemnon-1781

Actions she particpated:

Battle of Ushant, 1781
Battle of the Saintes, 1782
Battle of Genoa, 1795
Battle of the Hyères Islands, 1795
Battle of Copenhagen, 1801
Battle of Cape Finisterre, 1805
Battle of Trafalgar, 1805
Battle of San Domingo, 1806
Battle of Copenhagen, 1807

Duckworth's_action_off_San_Domingo,_6_February_1806,_Nicholas_Pocock.jpg
"Duckworth's Action off San Domingo, 6 February 1806" by Nicholas Pocock. HMS Agamemnon is visible in the background, third from left.

Construction

Agamemnon was ordered from the commercial shipbuilder Henry Adams at his Bucklers Hard shipyard on the Beaulieu River on 5 February 1777, to be built to the lines of the Ardent class, as designed by Sir Thomas Slade. Her keel was laid down in May. She was constructed using timber sourced from the surrounding New Forest. The total cost of her construction was £38,303 15s 4d. She was commissioned on 28 March 1781 under Captain Benjamin Caldwell—a full 13 days before her launch on 10 April.

She was named after King Agamemnon, a prominent figure in ancient Greek mythology who participated in the Siege of Troy, and was the first Royal Navy vessel to bear the name. Lord Nelson regarded her as his favourite ship, and to her crew she was known by the affectionate nickname 'Eggs–and–Bacon'. According to an article in The Gentleman's Magazine, her crew renamed her as they did not like the classical names that were in vogue at the Admiralty during this period (the crews of Bellerophon and Polyphemus also 'renamed' their ships, to 'Billy Ruffian' and 'Polly Infamous' respectively, for the same reason).

Agamlineas.jpg Agamperfil.jpg
by http://www.histarmar.com.ar/HYAMNEWS/HyamNews2004/HY31-Agamemnon.htm


Anglo-French War

In November 1781, the Admiralty had received intelligence that a large convoy was preparing to sail from Brest under Admiral de Guichen. The convoy was composed of transports carrying naval supplies for the West Indies and the French fleet in the East Indies. Agamemnon was part of Admiral Richard Kempenfelt's squadron of 18 ships (11 of which mounted 64 or more guns), which he commanded from HMS Victory. Kempenfelt was ordered to intercept the convoy, which he did in the afternoon of 12 December in the Bay of Biscay, approximately 150 miles (241.4 km) south-west of Ushant. With the French naval escort to leeward of the convoy, Kempenfelt attacked immediately, capturing 15 of the transports before nightfall. The rest of the convoy scattered, most returning to Brest; only five transports reached the West Indies.

Early in 1782, she sailed to the West Indies as part of Admiral Sir George Rodney's squadron, with Rear-Admiral Sir Samuel Hood as his second in command. On 9 April, the Battle of the Saintes began with an indecisive skirmish, in which the ships of the vanguard division, under Hood's command, were badly damaged and forced to withdraw to make repairs. On 12 April, Agamemnon took part in the second action, which proved much more decisive. Over the course of the battle, Agamemnon had 2 lieutenants and 14 crewmen killed, and 22 others were wounded.

After the signing of the Treaties of Versailles brought an end to the Anglo-French War, Agamemnon returned from the West Indies to Chatham, where she was paid off and docked on 29 October 1783 for repairs and to have her copper sheathing replaced. She came out of dock on 4 June 1784, and was subsequently laid up in ordinary.

Nelsons flagship at anchor.jpg
HMS Victory, HMS Captain, HMS Agamemnon, HMS Vanguard & HMS Elephant
 

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Under Nelson

In anticipation of the start of Britain's involvement in the French Revolutionary War after the execution of King Louis XVI, Agamemnon was recommissioned on 31 January 1793. She was placed under the command of Captain Horatio Nelson, and after provisioning joined the fleet lying at anchor at the Nore. She subsequently sailed to join the Mediterranean fleet under Vice-Admiral Hood, which was blockading the French port of Toulon. On 27 August the town of Toulon declared its allegiance to the Royalist Bourbon cause, and Hood's fleet moved in to take control of the naval dockyard and the 30 French ships of the line that were in the harbour. After capturing 19 of the ships, Agamemnon was sent to Naples to ask King Ferdinand IV for reinforcements with which to secure the town; he agreed to provide 4,000 men. When the revolutionary army, commanded by Napoleon Buonaparte, launched its assault against Toulon, the troops proved insufficient to hold it, and they were forced to abandon the town. Later in the autumn, Agamemnon fought the inconclusive Action of 22 October 1793 against a French frigate squadron off Sardinia.

In April and May 1794, seamen from Agamemnon, led by Nelson, helped capture the Corsican town of Bastia. The French surrendered on 21 May, after a 40-day siege. After this action, Agamemnon was forced to sail to Gibraltar to undergo urgent repairs, the ship having become very worn out after just 16 months at sea, despite having undergone a fairly extensive refit just prior to being recommissioned. Upon completion of her repairs, Agamemnon returned to Corsica, anchoring south of Calvi on 18 June. After Hood arrived with additional ships, Agamemnon contributed guns and men to the 51-day siege of Calvi, during which time Nelson lost the sight in his right eye when a French shot kicked sand and grit into his face. The town surrendered on 10 August, Agamemnon having lost six men in the engagement. Shortly thereafter the inhabitants of Corsica declared themselves to be subjects of His Majesty King George III.

1280px-Capnoli.jpg
Agamemnon (left) battling Ça Ira on 13 March 1795. The frigates HMS Inconstant (left, background) and Vestale (right) are also visible.

Agamemnon, still with the Mediterranean fleet—now under Vice-Admiral William Hotham, who had superseded Hood in December 1794—participated in the Battle of Genoa when a French fleet, comprising 15 ships of the line, was sighted on 10 March 1795. Three days later, the French having shown no signs that they were willing to give battle, Admiral Hotham ordered a general chase. The French ship Ça Ira lost her fore and main topmasts when she ran into one of the other ships of the French fleet, Victoire, allowing HMS Inconstant to catch up with and engage her. Agamemnon and Captain came up to assist soon after, and continued firing into the 80-gun French ship until the arrival of more French ships led to Admiral Hotham signalling for the British ships to retreat. Ça Ira was captured the following day, along with Censeur, which was towing her, by Captain and Bedford.

On 7 July 1795, whilst in company with a small squadron of frigates, Agamemnon was chased by a French fleet of 22 ships of the line and 6 frigates. Due to adverse winds, Admiral Hotham was unable to come to her aid until the following day, and the French fleet was sighted again on 13 July, off the Hyères Islands. Hotham signalled for his 23 ships of the line to give chase, and in the ensuing Battle of the Hyères Islands, Agamemnon was one of the few Royal Navy ships to engage the enemy fleet.[a] The French ship Alcide struck her colours during the battle, only to catch fire and sink. Many of the other French ships were in a similar condition; Agamemnon and Cumberland were manoeuvring to attack a French 80-gun ship when Admiral Hotham signalled his fleet to retreat, allowing the French to escape into the Gulf of Fréjus. Admiral Hotham was later greatly criticised for calling off the battle, and was relieved as Commander-in-Chief in the Mediterranean by Admiral Sir John Jervis at the end of the year.

Nelson was promoted to Commodore on 11 March. Shortly thereafter, in the action of 31 May 1796, boats from Agamemnon and Nelson's squadron captured a small convoy of French vessels off the Franco-Italian coast, while suffering minimal casualties.

On 10 June 1796 Nelson transferred his pennant to HMS Captain, Captain John Samuel Smith replacing him as Agamemnon's commander. Having been deemed in great need of repair, Agamemnon then returned to England.

Aga enganging CaIra.jpg
left side: The third, but second in order of events, in a series of ten drawings (PAF5871–PAF5874, PAF5876, PAF5880–PAF5881 and PAF5883–PAF5885) of mainly lesser-known incidents in Nelson's career, apparently intended for5 a set of engravings. Pocock's own numbered description of the subject in a letter of 2 June 1810 is: ' 3. The "Agamemnon" Engages 4 French Frigates and a Corvette.' For the rather complex circumstances of the commission, and Pocock's related letters, see PAF5871, ' View of St Eustatius with the "Boreas" '. A larger version of this action of Sardinia, from a different viewpoint, belongs to the Royal Naval Club, Portsmouth. Pocock also exhibited the subject at the O.W.C.S in 1811 (no. 17). Signed by the artist and dated, lower right. Exhibited: NMM Pocock exhib. (1975) no. 4

Aga enganging CaIra2.jpg

right side: The ninth, but third in order of events, in a series of ten drawings (PAF5871–PAF5874, PAF5876, PAF5880–PAF5881 and PAF5883–5885) of mainly lesser-known incidents in Nelson's career, apparently intended for a set of engravings. Pocock's own (unnumbered) description of the subject in a letter of 9 July 1810 is: 'the "Agamemnons" engagement with the "Ca Ira", within Gun Shot of a Tremendous Force and no Support near', 'Agamemnon' being on the right. For the rather complex circumstances of the commission, and Pocock's related letters, see 'View of St Eustatius with the "Boreas"' (PAF5871). A variant of this drawing of the 'Ca Ira' in action, slightly extended on the right, was formerly in the collection of Sir Bruce Ingram. Signed by the artist and dated, lower right. Exhibited: NMM Pocock exhib. (1975) no. 46.


Mutiny

In May 1797, whilst under the command of Captain Robert Fancourt, Agamemnon was involved in the Nore mutiny. On 29 May, the North Sea squadron lying in the Yarmouth Roads was ordered to sea. Only three ships, Adamant, Agamemnon and Glatton, obeyed the signal, but Agamemnon's crew later mutinied, and sailed the ship back to Yarmouth Roads. The ship was then taken to join the main mutiny at the Nore anchorage, along with Ardent, Isis and Leopard, arriving on 7 June. After a blockade of London was formed by the mutineers, several ships began to desert the wider mutiny, in many cases being fired upon by the remaining ships. Order was eventually restored aboard Agamemnon when the loyal seamen and marines forcibly ejected the hard-line mutineers from the ship. Captain Fancourt was able to secure a pardon for the remaining ship's company.
 

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Napoleonic Wars

Agamemnon's general condition in 1802 was so poor that, had hostilities with France not recommenced, she would likely have been hulked or broken up. Instead, after Britain's entry into the Napoleonic Wars, she was brought out of ordinary in 1804, recommissioned under Captain John Harvey on 31 July, and went to join the Channel fleet under Admiral William Cornwallis.

Agamemnon was part of Vice-Admiral Robert Calder's fleet cruising off Cape Finisterre on 22 July 1805, when the combined Franco-Spanish fleet from the West Indies was sighted to windward. The British ships formed into line of battle, with Agamemnon fifth in the line, and engaged Admiral Villeneuve's fleet in hazy conditions with light winds. Agamemnon had three men wounded in the Battle of Cape Finisterre, and lost her mizzen topmast and the foresail yard. By nightfall, Calder's fleet had become scattered, and he signalled for the action to be discontinued.

Trafalgar_aufstellung.jpg
Ship positions at the beginning of the Battle of Trafalgar. HMS Africa and HMS Neptune are erroneously shown in one another's positions


Battle of Trafalgar

On 17 September 1805, after completing a small refit of his ship in Portsmouth, Captain Harvey was superseded in command of Agamemnon by Captain Sir Edward Berry, who had previously commanded Nelson's flagship, HMS Vanguard, at the Battle of the Nile. On 3 October she departed Spithead to join Vice-Admiral Nelson's fleet blockading Villeneuve's combined fleet in Cádiz. En route, Agamemnon fell in with a French squadron, consisting of six ships of the line and several smaller vessels, which gave chase. Succeeding in evading the French, Agamemnon joined the blockading squadron on 13 October, and when Nelson laid eyes on the approaching ship he reportedly exclaimed: "Here comes that damned fool Berry! Now we shall have a battle!" In misty conditions on 20 October, Agamemnon captured a large American merchant brig, which she then took in tow. Not long after, HMS Euryalus signalled to Agamemnon that she was sailing straight towards an enemy fleet of 30 ships — Villeneuve's fleet had left port.

On 21 October 1805 Agamemnon fought in the Battle of Trafalgar. Agamemnon was positioned eighth in Nelson's weather column, with HMS Orion ahead and HMS Minotaur astern. Once engaged, she was firing both batteries, eventually pounding the great Spanish four-decker Santísima Trinidad until that ship was dismasted and, with 216 of her complement dead, struck her colours. Before Berry could take possession of the prize, the enemy van division began bearing down on the British line, having previously been cut off from the battle by Nelson's line-breaking tactics. With Nelson already dying below decks on Victory, Captain of the Fleet Thomas Hardy ordered Agamemnon and several other ships to intercept them. Three of the enemy ships broke off and ran for Cádiz; after briefly engaging Intrépide the British ships moved to try to cut off the fleeing ships. Over the course of the battle, Agamemnon suffered just two fatalities, and eight men were wounded.

Following the battle, Agamemnon, despite taking on three feet of water in her hold each hour, took HMS Colossus under tow to Gibraltar. After carrying out repairs, the ship rejoined Vice-Admiral Collingwood's squadron, which had resumed the blockade of Cádiz.
 

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Loss

In February 1808, Agamemnon sailed with Rear-Admiral Sir Sidney Smith's flagship Foudroyant to Brazil, where they joined another squadron. At Rio de Janeiro it was discovered that Agamemnon was again quite worn out, with seams in her planking opening and some of her framing bolts broken.[21] In October, Agamemnon and Monarch anchored in Maldonado Bay, in the mouth of the River Plate. They had been escorting the merchant vessel Maria, which had carried the surgeon Dr. James Paroissien to Montevideo where he was tasked with exposing a plot against King John VI of Portugal, who was in exile in Brazil. Whilst there, Monarch ran aground, requiring Agamemnon's assistance to get her off. After learning that Paroissien had been imprisoned, the two ships put to sea, but were forced to return to Maldonado Bay when they encountered bad weather. After the ships returned to Rio in January 1809, the ship was fully surveyed by the carpenter, who drew up an extensive list of her defects.

On 16 June 1809 Agamemnon, along with the rest of the squadron (which was now under the command of Rear-Admiral Michael de Courcy), put into Maldonado Bay for the third and final time, to shelter from a storm. While working her way between Gorriti Island and the shore, Agamemnon struck an uncharted shoal. Captain Jonas Rose attempted to use the ship's boats, together with the stream and kedge anchors, to pull the ship off, but to no avail. The ship had dropped anchor on the shoal just previously, and it was discovered that she had run onto it when she grounded, the anchor having pierced the hull. On 17 June, with the ship listing heavily to starboard, Agamemnon's stores and all her crew were taken off by boats from other vessels in the squadron, and the following day Captain Rose and his officers left the ship.


Legacy

In 1993 the wreck was located north of Gorriti Island in Maldonado Bay by Maritime historian Hector Bado and underwater survey expert. later in 1997 with the help of Mensun Bound have documented the remains and recovered a number of artefacts, including a seal bearing the name 'Nelson,' and one of Agamemnon's 24-pounder guns from her main gundeck.

The historical novelist Patrick O'Brian selected Agamemnon as one of the ships on which Jack Aubrey served as lieutenant, before the events of Master and Commander, the first novel in his Aubrey–Maturin series. Agamemnon has also been the subject of at least two paintings by the British artist Geoff Hunt, currently the president of the Royal Society of Marine Artists.
 

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In the archive Greenwich we can find several drawings of the HMS Agamamnon and also other vessels of the Ardent class 64 gun Ship of the Line

Body Plan and sheer lines some of Ardent class.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan, sheer lines with inboard detail, and longitudinal half-breadth for Raisonnable (1768), and later for Agamemnon (1781) and Belliqueux (1780), all 64-gun Third Rate, two-deckers. Signed by Thomas Slade [Surveyor of the Navy, 1755-1771], and John Williams [Surveyor of the Navy, 1765-1784]

body plan and sheer lines some of Ardent class2.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan, sheer lines with quarter gallery decoration, and longitudinal half-breadth proposed (and approved) for building Ardent (1764) at Hull, and later for Raisonnable (1768), both 64-gun Third Rate, two-deckers. Signed by Thomas Slade [Surveyor of the Navy, 1755-1771], and John Clevland [Secretary to the Admiralty].


Body Plan Ardent class.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan, sheer lines (with modified main mast position), and longitudinal half-breadth for 'Ardent' (1764), 'Raisonable' (1768), 'Belliqueux' (1780), 'Agamemnon' (1782), 'Indefatigable' (1784), 'Stately' (1784), and 'Nassau' (1785), all 64-gun Third Rate, two-deckers.


Nassau inboard.jpg
. Plan showing the inboard for 'Nassau' (1785) a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker, building at Bristol by Mr Hilhouse. Initialled by Edward Hunt [Surveyor of the Navy, 1778-1784]


imboard profile Ardent class.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the imboard profile for 'Ardent' (1764), 'Raisonable' (1768) 'Belliqueux' (1780, 'Agamemnon' (1781), 'Indefatigable' (1784), 'Stately' (1784), and 'Nassau' (1785), all 64-gun Third Rate, two-deckers. The plan includes later (undated) alterations for converting a ship of this class to a troopship. The only ship to be converted was 'Nassau' (1785) in 1799


gun deck Ardent class.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the gun (lower) deck proposed for 'Ardent' (1764), a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker. The plan includes later (undated) alterations for converting a ship of this class to a troopship. The only ship to be converted was 'Nassau' (1785) in 1799.


orlop deck Ardent.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the orlop deck with fore and aft platforms proposed for 'Ardent' (1764), a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker. The plan includes later (undated) alterations for converting a ship of this class to a troopship. The only ship to be converted was 'Nassau' (1785) in 1799.


quarter deck and forecastle Ardent.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the quarterdeck and forecastle proposed for 'Ardent' (1764), a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker. The plan includes later (undated) alterations for converting a ship of this class to a troopship. The only ship to be converted was 'Nassau' (1785) in 1799.


upper deck Ardent.jpg
Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the upper deck proposed for 'Ardent' (1764), a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker. The plan includes later (undated) alterations for converting a ship of this class to a troopship. The only ship to be converted was 'Nassau' (1785) in 1799.
 

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Also in Greenwhich:

model HMS Indefatigable Ardent class.jpg
Scale: 1:48. A contemporary block design model of the 64-gun, two-decker ship of the line ‘Indefatigable’ (1784). The number ‘2’ is painted on the base. The hull is painted white below the waterline and the locations of the gun ports and chain plates are painted on the side. The figurehead is in the form of a solid block. The ‘Indefatigable’ was built at Buckler’s Hard by Adams and designed by Sir T. Slade. It measured 160 feet along the gun deck by 44 feet in the beam, displacing 1384 tons. In 1794 it was reduced to a fifth rate and subsequently commissioned to patrol the Channel, capturing a number of French privateers in 1795–1800. In 1805 it took part in the blockade of Brest and in 1812–15 it was stationed in South America. It was broken up in 1816 at Sheerness.

aga.jpg
The second, but fourth in order of events, in a series of ten drawings (PAF5871–PAF5874, PAF5876, PAF5880–PAF5881 and PAF5883–PAF5885) of mainly lesser-known incidents in Nelson's career, apparently intended for a set of engravings. Pocock's own numbered description of the subject in a letter of 2 June 1810 (see below) is: '2. The "Agamemnon" cutting out a Convoy of Vessells (with Implements for the Siege of Mantua) in Oneglia Bay.' This suggests that its received title of 'The “Agamemnon” cuts out French vessels from the Bays of Alassio and Laigueglia' is probably a later mistake. During Nelson's patrols on the French and Italian rivieras at this time, he took a French corvette at Alassio in July 1795; mounted a boat attack at Oneglia that August and cut out four vessels from Finale in April 1796. However, the number of ships shown including a bomb vessel, which is seen in stern view, immediately left of 'Agamemnon' and Pocock's identification, strongly suggest this is an incident on 1 June 1796 at Port Maurice – then in France – when Nelson cut out a French bomb, a brig and three ketches. Port Maurice, which finally became Italian as Porto Maurizio in 1815, is next to Oneglia and both are now part of the Italian city of Imperia. For the rather complex circumstances of the commission of these ten drawings, and Pocock's related letters, see 'View of St Eustatius with the "Boreas"' (PAF5871). Signed by the artist and dated in the lower left. Exhibited: NMM Pocock exhib. (1975) no. 47.

Nelsons flagship at anchor.jpg
A composite picture showing five of the ships in which Nelson served as a captain and flag officer from the start of the French Wars in 1793 to his death in 1805. The artist has depicted them drying sails in a calm at Spithead, Portsmouth, and despite the traditional title, two of them were not strictly flagships. The ship on the left in bow view is the 'Agamemnon', 64 guns. It was Nelson's favourite ship, which he commanded as a captain from 1793. Broadside on is the 'Vanguard', 74 guns, his flagship at the Battle of the Nile in 1798 flying a white ensign and his blue flag as Rear-Admiral of the Blue at the mizzen. Stern on is the 'Elephant', 74 guns, his temporary flagship at the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801. She is flying the blue ensign from the stern and Nelson's flag as Vice-Admiral of the Blue at her foremast. In the centre distance is the 'Captain', 74 guns, in which Nelson flew a commodore's broad pendant at the Battle of St Vincent, 1797. Dominating the right foreground is the 'Victory', 100 guns, shown in her original state, with open stern galleries, and not as she was at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. She is shown at anchor flying the flag of Vice-Admiral of the White, Nelson's Trafalgar rank, and firing a salute to starboard as an admiral's barge is rowed alongside, amidst other small craft. The painting is one of a series of six paintings created for a two-volume 'Life of Nelson', begun shortly after Nelson's death in 1805 by Clarke and McArthur and published in 1809. They were engraved by James Fittler and reproduced in the biography with lengthy explanatory texts. The artist placed considerable importance on accuracy, referring to his annotated drawings and sketch plans in the production of his oil paintings. Pocock was born and brought up in Bristol, went to sea at the age of 17 and rose to command several merchant ships. Although he only took up painting as a profession in his early forties, he became extremely successful, receiving commissions from naval commanders anxious to have accurate portrayals of actions and ships. By the age of 80, Pocock had recorded nearly 40 years of maritime history, demonstrating a meticulous understanding of shipping and rigging with close attention to detail.
 

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Here some additional links related to HMS Agamemnon

On Threedecks
https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=2927

an argentinian page related to the fate:
http://www.histarmar.com.ar/HYAMNEWS/HyamNews2004/HY31-Agamemnon.htm

wonderfull built model on pinterest:
https://www.pinterest.co.uk/den2120/hms-agamemnon-1781/?autologin=true

another very good model on modelships.de :
http://www.modelships.de/Agamemnon_III/Photos-Agamemnon_III.htm
http://www.modelships.de/Agamemnon_III/Photos-Agamemnon_III_details.htm

a very good 3-D animation by P.R. Dobson
http://www.prdobson.com/legacy/project/hms-agamemnon-1781/
1-aga_139-123-1086885208-mid.jpg

on wikipedia:
https://wikivisually.com/wiki/HMS_Agamemnon_(1781)

There is also a book written by Anthony N.Deane with title "Nelson's Favourtie: HMS Agamemnon, 1781-1809" which I do not know in detail until now
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nelsons-Favourite-HMS-Agamemnon-1781-1809/dp/184067430X
51FAEMR1HVL._SX342_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 

Uwek

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and as every time a short information about the Ardent class taken from wikipedia

Ardent-class ship of the line

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardent-class_ship_of_the_line
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Ardent-class_ships_of_the_line

The Ardent-class ships of the line were a class of seven 64-gun third rates, designed for the Royal Navy by Sir Thomas Slade.

Ardent_class_silhouette.png
silhouette of an Ardent-class ship of the line

Ships
  • HMS Ardent later french L´Ardent after capture 17.08.1779
Builder: Blades, Hull
Ordered: 16 December 1761
Launched: 13 August 1764
Fate: Sold out of the service, 1784
Builder: Chatham Dockyard
Ordered: 11 January 1763
Launched: 10 December 1768
Fate: Broken up, 1815
Builder: Adams, Bucklers Hard
Ordered: 8 April 1777
Launched: 10 April 1781
Fate: Wrecked, 1809
Builder: Perry, Blackwall Yard
Ordered: 19 February 1778
Launched: 5 June 1780
Fate: Broken up, 1816
Builder: Raymond, Northam
Ordered: 10 December 1778
Launched: 27 December 1784
Fate: Broken up, 1814
Builder: Adams, Bucklers Hard
Ordered: 3 August 1780
Launched: July 1784
Fate: Broken up, 1816
Builder: Hilhouse, Bristol
Ordered: 14 November 1782
Launched: 28 September 1785
Fate: Wrecked, 1799


General characteristics:

Length: 160 ft (49 m) (gundeck)
131 ft 8 in (40.13 m) (keel)
Beam: 44 ft 4 in (13.51 m)
Armament:
64 guns:
Gundeck: 26 × 24-pounders
Upper gundeck: 26 × 18-pounders
Quarterdeck: 10 × 4-pounders
Forecastle: 2 × 9-pounders


further link on Threedecks:
https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_class&id=17
 
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