I don't like :ghost boats"

Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
12
Points
48

All of the ships I have built to date have been meant to sail on the water. I dislike seeing a boat plying the water with no crew—a “ghost boat.” With people aboard the boat looks so much more realistic. With a search on the Internet one can find a suitable crew in just about any scale, although it may take some looking. And once in your shop they may require painting. A couple examples below show what can be done.

My latest project is the OcCre “Ulises” tugboat in 1/30 scale. I searched a long time but finally found this crew of early 20th century merchant seaman in 1/32 scale (close enough) on the Shapeways site. They were laser printed in white plastic resin and required painting. Although I am 79 years old my hands are still pretty steady, so I completed the job using Model Master enamels and acryl paints. A crew for just about any scale, type, or vintage boat can be found on the Shapeways site.

A000C94B-C8A0-40FC-9B6F-8100AD10007D_1_105_c.jpegD8E7BDBC-FC9F-40FD-ADF3-3A11130EA40F_1_105_c.jpeg

Mt. Washington plied the waters of Lake Winnipesaukee in Vermont USA for almost 70 years. This is the Dumas model of this boat. How much better it looks sailing on a typical excursion with people aboard! Unfortunately, I don’t remember where I bought the little people. They came in a bag of about 75, but were sloppily painted and I had to touch up each one, some in a major way.

4F825394-2079-4F69-BEFD-856FAE6138E4_1_105_c.jpeg

Another Dumas model, this is the SC-1 Class Subchaser from WW I. This 1/35 laser-printed crew also was purchased from Shapeways and required painting. There are five deck hands althogether. The boat now looks ready to sail in search of German U-boats.

1987AF27-9DA0-465C-AC77-0B63162DE101_1_105_c.jpeg
 
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
84
Points
58

Location
Hamburg Germany
All of the ships I have built to date have been meant to sail on the water. I dislike seeing a boat plying the water with no crew—a “ghost boat.” With people aboard the boat looks so much more realistic. With a search on the Internet one can find a suitable crew in just about any scale, although it may take some looking. And once in your shop they may require painting. A couple examples below show what can be done.

My latest project is the OcCre “Ulises” tugboat in 1/30 scale. I searched a long time but finally found this crew of early 20th century merchant seaman in 1/32 scale (close enough) on the Shapeways site. They were laser printed in white plastic resin and required painting. Although I am 79 years old my hands are still pretty steady, so I completed the job using Model Master enamels and acryl paints. A crew for just about any scale, type, or vintage boat can be found on the Shapeways site.

View attachment 220757View attachment 220758

Mt. Washington plied the waters of Lake Winnipesaukee in Vermont USA for almost 70 years. This is the Dumas model of this boat. How much better it looks sailing on a typical excursion with people aboard! Unfortunately, I don’t remember where I bought the little people. They came in a bag of about 75, but were sloppily painted and I had to touch up each one, some in a major way.

View attachment 220759

Another Dumas model, this is the SC-1 Class Subchaser from WW I. This 1/35 laser-printed crew also was purchased from Shapeways and required painting. There are five deck hands althogether. The boat now looks ready to sail in search of German U-boats.

View attachment 220760
 
Joined
May 26, 2020
Messages
143
Points
88

Location
Woodgate Queensland Australia
All of the ships I have built to date have been meant to sail on the water. I dislike seeing a boat plying the water with no crew—a “ghost boat.” With people aboard the boat looks so much more realistic. With a search on the Internet one can find a suitable crew in just about any scale, although it may take some looking. And once in your shop they may require painting. A couple examples below show what can be done.

My latest project is the OcCre “Ulises” tugboat in 1/30 scale. I searched a long time but finally found this crew of early 20th century merchant seaman in 1/32 scale (close enough) on the Shapeways site. They were laser printed in white plastic resin and required painting. Although I am 79 years old my hands are still pretty steady, so I completed the job using Model Master enamels and acryl paints. A crew for just about any scale, type, or vintage boat can be found on the Shapeways site.

View attachment 220757View attachment 220758

Mt. Washington plied the waters of Lake Winnipesaukee in Vermont USA for almost 70 years. This is the Dumas model of this boat. How much better it looks sailing on a typical excursion with people aboard! Unfortunately, I don’t remember where I bought the little people. They came in a bag of about 75, but were sloppily painted and I had to touch up each one, some in a major way.

View attachment 220759

Another Dumas model, this is the SC-1 Class Subchaser from WW I. This 1/35 laser-printed crew also was purchased from Shapeways and required painting. There are five deck hands althogether. The boat now looks ready to sail in search of German U-boats.

View attachment 220760
Very nice models. I have the Ulises also and hope to start it soon.
Are you able to provide a link to the crew members you bought, were they off the shelf our did you need to get them printed? I would be very interested for my build.
Thanks Allan
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
2,418
Points
488

Location
Eugene, Oregon
All of the ships I have built to date have been meant to sail on the water. I dislike seeing a boat plying the water with no crew—a “ghost boat.” With people aboard the boat looks so much more realistic. With a search on the Internet one can find a suitable crew in just about any scale, although it may take some looking. And once in your shop they may require painting. A couple examples below show what can be done.

My latest project is the OcCre “Ulises” tugboat in 1/30 scale. I searched a long time but finally found this crew of early 20th century merchant seaman in 1/32 scale (close enough) on the Shapeways site. They were laser printed in white plastic resin and required painting. Although I am 79 years old my hands are still pretty steady, so I completed the job using Model Master enamels and acryl paints. A crew for just about any scale, type, or vintage boat can be found on the Shapeways site.

View attachment 220757View attachment 220758

Mt. Washington plied the waters of Lake Winnipesaukee in Vermont USA for almost 70 years. This is the Dumas model of this boat. How much better it looks sailing on a typical excursion with people aboard! Unfortunately, I don’t remember where I bought the little people. They came in a bag of about 75, but were sloppily painted and I had to touch up each one, some in a major way.

View attachment 220759

Another Dumas model, this is the SC-1 Class Subchaser from WW I. This 1/35 laser-printed crew also was purchased from Shapeways and required painting. There are five deck hands althogether. The boat now looks ready to sail in search of German U-boats.

View attachment 220760
Very nice repainting for your crew and passengers. I may have to try to find some Grand Banks fishermen at 1:64 scale. Rich (PT-2)
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
2,418
Points
488

Location
Eugene, Oregon
All of the ships I have built to date have been meant to sail on the water. I dislike seeing a boat plying the water with no crew—a “ghost boat.” With people aboard the boat looks so much more realistic. With a search on the Internet one can find a suitable crew in just about any scale, although it may take some looking. And once in your shop they may require painting. A couple examples below show what can be done.

My latest project is the OcCre “Ulises” tugboat in 1/30 scale. I searched a long time but finally found this crew of early 20th century merchant seaman in 1/32 scale (close enough) on the Shapeways site. They were laser printed in white plastic resin and required painting. Although I am 79 years old my hands are still pretty steady, so I completed the job using Model Master enamels and acryl paints. A crew for just about any scale, type, or vintage boat can be found on the Shapeways site.

View attachment 220757View attachment 220758

Mt. Washington plied the waters of Lake Winnipesaukee in Vermont USA for almost 70 years. This is the Dumas model of this boat. How much better it looks sailing on a typical excursion with people aboard! Unfortunately, I don’t remember where I bought the little people. They came in a bag of about 75, but were sloppily painted and I had to touch up each one, some in a major way.

View attachment 220759

Another Dumas model, this is the SC-1 Class Subchaser from WW I. This 1/35 laser-printed crew also was purchased from Shapeways and required painting. There are five deck hands althogether. The boat now looks ready to sail in search of German U-boats.

View attachment 220760
that is a very nice painting job bringing the figures to life with your color selections and precise work. I need to find some Grand Banks Schooner dory fishermen at 1:64 scale which doesn't seem very common. Rich
 
Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
12
Points
48

Very nice models. I have the Ulises also and hope to start it soon.
Are you able to provide a link to the crew members you bought, were they off the shelf our did you need to get them printed? I would be very interested for my build.
Thanks Allan
You can find them with a search on the Shapeways web site (https://www.shapeways.com). They are laser printed on demand, so you may have to wait for a few days before they are shipped.
 
Joined
Mar 14, 2020
Messages
21
Points
58

Location
Jersey Shore, NJ
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
2,418
Points
488

Location
Eugene, Oregon
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
84
Points
58

Location
Hamburg Germany
I'd check model train suppliers. Taking a look at the various scales shows that there are several that seem to line up pretty well with those used in shipmodeling.
  • Z scale – 1:1220
  • N scale – 1:160
  • HO scale – 1:87
  • S scale – 1:64
  • O scale – 1:48
  • G scale – 1:24 to 1:32
https://www.model-space.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/diecast-legendary-train.jpg
There is still the widespread scale for Wiking, Bassett-Lowke, Triang etc in 1: 1:250. You can get an impression via my link on the right
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
2,418
Points
488

Location
Eugene, Oregon
There is still the widespread scale for Wiking, Bassett-Lowke, Triang etc in 1: 1:250. You can get an impression via my link on the right
Rich will have to look at the S Scale figures that may work with Grand Banks fishing schooners. Not hopeful but there is no future in pessimism. Rich
 
Top