James Caird - 1/24 scale - scratch built

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I have also been working on a case for my James Caird model. After cutting and assembling the pieces, I decided to make the base of a case into a snowfield, on which the model will sit. I accomplished this by roughing up the base with my power carving tools, creating subtle hills and valleys, and then painting the base to resemble snow. A coat of gesso was followed by several coats of white and a wash of dilute cerulean blue to create the illusion of shadows on the snow. I even carved into the base the two tracks that would have resulted from the sledge being dragged across the surface.

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Nice build Jonrton and have to agree with you Ted:)
Your research and dedication to scale accuracy in the build is excellent and well presented with the explanations that will provide suggestions to other modelers facing some of the same tasks. Well done. . . no. . . OUTSTANDING. PT-2
 
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Thanks for all the kind words. I do not have the technical skills that many modelers have, but I always try to have my models tell a story in some way. Is there such a thing as “narrative shipmodeling”?
 
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Thanks for all the kind words. I do not have the technical skills that many modelers have, but I always try to have my models tell a story in some way. Is there such a thing as “narrative shipmodeling”?
In some ways, I think every ship model can be considered a 'narrative' - the actual (fullsize) boats/ships each had a history - some were undistinguished, but others played a major role in events.
For example, my 'King's Fisher' was a British sloop that got tangled up in the American war of Independence, while 'Natterer' was modelled on a Lake Windermere (UK) steam launch that featured in the invention of the 'Kitchin' rudder, and in early experiments with Radio Control.
In addition, a model can be depicted in an appropriate setting, as is your James Caird, or maybe on the slip being built or repaired - they are all 'narratives'.
You appear to have a very interesting model collection - you should show us some more!

Ted
 
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I have seen some beautifully made ship models at shows, nicely displayed in cases and with labels with the name of the ship, the scale, and the model builder. For a model builder, these models are a source of inspiration and motivation, as well as information on how to create this or that detail. For the general public, however, the history behind the ship or boat is often not described at all or might be on a small plaque or card. I have seen people walking through ship model shows taking only cursory glances at some really gorgeous models. I want to include something on each of my models that would catch the attention the non-modeler walking by the display, causing that person to stop and wonder what the model is really all about. For this model, the “bait” will be a figure of a pensive Shackleton standing on the ice next to the boat, contemplating it and touching it with his hand, as if he is questioning whether the makeshift craft that he and his carpenter have put together will actually carry him the 800 or so miles to South Georgia. Each of our models has a story and represents a conscious choice by us to invest scores or hundreds of hours of work in creating it. We should all attempt to communicate that story, or that history, through our design and presentation of our models, in my opinion. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2020
Messages
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Location
Southern Maine
In some ways, I think every ship model can be considered a 'narrative' - the actual (fullsize) boats/ships each had a history - some were undistinguished, but others played a major role in events.
For example, my 'King's Fisher' was a British sloop that got tangled up in the American war of Independence, while 'Natterer' was modelled on a Lake Windermere (UK) steam launch that featured in the invention of the 'Kitchin' rudder, and in early experiments with Radio Control.
In addition, a model can be depicted in an appropriate setting, as is your James Caird, or maybe on the slip being built or repaired - they are all 'narratives'.
You appear to have a very interesting model collection - you should show us some more!

Ted
I have already posted pictures of several of my models in the “completed models” forum. Hope you enjoy them.
 
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Apr 14, 2020
Messages
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Some additional photos of the James Caird, outside of its case. I am starting work on two figures, one of Shackleton and one of a crew member working inside the boat. Shackleton will be standing on the snow alongside the boat, with one hand touching the side of the Caird as if to say “I really hope you can carry us on this impossible voyage to South Georgia”! I will make the figures from epoxy clay over wire armatures, and will post in-progress photos of the process I use.

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