Kolderstok Willem Barentsz, AD 1596

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Oh no. I'm not allowed to touch the Admirals washer or dryer. Something about separating colors before loading the washing and taking small tools out of pockets before putting dirty clothes in the laundry bin.
Good morning Jan- ditto ROTF. I think the white shirts would be pink if I gave it a go....

You mentioned a railroad - any pic’s. My late Dad and his business partner built one - like 50 years ago. Fond memories of watching them. Cheers Grant.
 
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You mentioned a railroad - any pic’s. My late Dad and his business partner built one - like 50 years ago. Fond memories of watching them. Cheers Grant.
Hi Grant, my railroad is G scale, all the running stock is based on the narrow gauge Swiss RhB.

96E958CE-E4FE-44C8-9966-6D4E408280A3.jpeg

0F0C7A44-09FC-40C9-8B1D-CEBCF7B9B68D.jpeg

FDF66FB2-F959-44A9-99B5-5588F022D9D1.jpeg

1DDB17FC-7A71-47EF-97D5-2475B8D70DB7.jpeg

The last picture gives you a good indication of the size of the rolling stock. The track plan is a switching puzzle and it takes about an hour to complete all the moves. Passenger trains are configured in push - pull mode, goods trains have seven locations to shunt cars too. One operator can work the puzzle but two or more are better. There is not much of a requirement for scenery and no trains “chuff” around in a circle.

The layout is ”U” shaped. the smaller leg of the “U” is a three track yard, that‘s both a destination and a “marshaling yard”, the longer part of the “U” is a destination called “HundHause” (The training kennel for our Labrador “JD” was stored under that part).

Picture number 3 shows the control panel and track layout for that piece. The control panel is loaded with multiple momentary “ON-OFF-ON” toggle switches to control track voltage, uncouplers, sound cards, etc. All the wiring is color coded (a great help for troubleshooting when Mr. Murphy and his pals the Gremlins show up).

The two legs of the “U” are connected by two tracks with one being a “WYE” to allow turning or reversing a train.

The running voltage is a constant voltage of 22 or so volts DCC (Direct Command Control) via LGB‘s MTS (Multi Train System). Each engine has a digital controller that responds to a digital address. I can run up to eight engines at the same time. There are four wireless controllers, so I can have up to four operators during a running session.

So there you have it.
 
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Back to the WB:

Day two of the first fairing and shaping of the Balsa filler pieces. I waited until the afternoon hoping the temperature would rise above 50 degrees and the wind would die down. Being old, ornery, crotchety and determined I finally ventured out onto the porch. Well it was less than 50 degrees and the wind was gusting at a good rate.

The stern filler.

2F0C1D48-3466-451D-BCC5-5ABB7677A088.jpeg

The bow filler.

E4C757C1-223A-4145-9DDC-F4CC49B62DB2.jpeg


We’re getting close to sanding, plank fitting and repeat stage.
 

Heinrich

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That looks very well-faired Jan. It's the old story - the better the preparation, the better the results.
 
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That looks very well-faired Jan. It's the old story - the better the preparation, the better the results.
I think there is a fair amount of material that still needs to be removed. I'm using your suggested aggressive technique by using 100 grit sandpaper, of course with a wee bit of caution.
The rest of the keel installation seems to be a source of controversy. Before starting to plank the hull or after the planking is completed?? You're thoughts??
 

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Jan luckily there is no controversy there - just a personal decision on the method you prefer. I left the keel off until planking was completed. I just think without the keel, it is easier to plank around the bow as you have much more room to manoeuvre the planks and also have a bigger area when it comes to pinning the planks. The downside is that you have to be pretty accurate with your X-Acto to cut open the slot for the keel after planking and then you have to be patiently fine-tune the slot by means of files and sandpaper. Piet put on the keel first and then completed his planking which worked very well for him. So, in the end, it all comes down to personal choice.
 
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Oh boy, the planking struggle begins.

Cut, sand, fit, soak, fit, sand, soak, etc. After countless tries the pictures show my almost fitting first plank. (The bad word jar had many a donation and the coffee, oh wow, I was on a caffeine high)

The bow.

E0FD1F23-69EE-4748-86B5-DDFF60B0EE14.jpeg

Bow to midships.

8083A274-6B7A-4772-8A6E-CA261DA56B40.jpeg

Midship to stern.


27B64EA7-BDBD-4794-9290-539180D9A0D2.jpeg.



C608E5BC-9CAE-4343-A828-25E0FE7A5E6F.jpeg

The top view.

4FBC4137-B667-4B8A-A6DE-5C2D6FFA873B.jpeg

I know Heinrich, use pins not clamps, but after the first couple of attempts the pinholes in the bulkheads surrounding the plank had enlarged enough to become useless, hence the clamps.
 

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That first plank looks brilliant Jan. That is the way to do it.

Now please - do not shoot me - but before you go any further, plug the hole in the filler block that you made for the bowsprit. The hole serves no purpose as the bowsprit lies at a completely different angle. Also with the hole there, you lose all the gluing and clamping/pinning surface for the top planks. You will thank me later!

微信图片_20211208162217.jpg
 
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That first plank looks brilliant Jan. That is the way to do it.

Now please - do not shoot me - but before you go any further, plug the hole in the filler block that you made for the bowsprit. The hole serves no purpose as the bowsprit lies at a completely different angle. Also with the hole there, you lose all the gluing and clamping/pinning surface for the top planks. You will thank me later!

View attachment 305577

Heinrich, thank you for that little titbit. I will take care of that shortly. I was trying to find a reference point at the stern to mark the top of the first plank. Hans shows a 12mm gap in his instructions, I think I‘m close but would like to be more positive,

Jan
 

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Heinrich, thank you for that little titbit. I will take care of that shortly. I was trying to find a reference point at the stern to mark the top of the first plank. Hans shows a 12mm gap in his instructions, I think I‘m close but would like to be more positive,

Jan
On mine it is exactly 12 mm. The top of the plank lies more or less level with the underside of the gun port.

微信图片_20220427222124.jpg
 
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It’s Spring, the grass is growing, the flower beds need to be opened and prepared, the Daffodils are up and showing their blooms. What has that to do with shipbuilding? Actually not much but that is what I’ve been up to for the last four days. So this afternoon I thought I would do a little bit in the shipyard as sort of a reward. :D

Frustrating, frustrating, frustrating. I’m still at the fairing, fitting of the first plank on the Port side. BUT I’m doing a great job of miss handling that little hull. I’m thinking that my enthusiastic fairing coupled with breaking various bulkheads is not good for this builds progress.

So, I‘ve made a minor adjustment that may help other builders avoid my problem.

074C5EF7-1A35-4289-9025-2710D37FE1DF.jpeg

I’m thinking the temporary brace will help with fairing and can be removed when the planks reach that level or if the gun ports are inscribed left in place.
 

Heinrich

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I will cross fingers that that helps Jan. The upper frames of bulkhead do get on the thin side so they may be vulnerable. Be careful that you do not fair too much. You don't want to end up with a hull that is too narrow.
 
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It’s Spring, the grass is growing, the flower beds need to be opened and prepared, the Daffodils are up and showing their blooms. What has that to do with shipbuilding? Actually not much but that is what I’ve been up to for the last four days. So this afternoon I thought I would do a little bit in the shipyard as sort of a reward. :D

Frustrating, frustrating, frustrating. I’m still at the fairing, fitting of the first plank on the Port side. BUT I’m doing a great job of miss handling that little hull. I’m thinking that my enthusiastic fairing coupled with breaking various bulkheads is not good for this builds progress.

So, I‘ve made a minor adjustment that may help other builders avoid my problem.

View attachment 306316

I’m thinking the temporary brace will help with fairing and can be removed when the planks reach that level or if the gun ports are inscribed left in place.
I've even had to mow once! Next up - turn the sprinkler system on! It does rob model shop time....
 
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Hi Grant, my railroad is G scale, all the running stock is based on the narrow gauge Swiss RhB.

View attachment 304886

View attachment 304887

View attachment 304888

View attachment 304889

The last picture gives you a good indication of the size of the rolling stock. The track plan is a switching puzzle and it takes about an hour to complete all the moves. Passenger trains are configured in push - pull mode, goods trains have seven locations to shunt cars too. One operator can work the puzzle but two or more are better. There is not much of a requirement for scenery and no trains “chuff” around in a circle.

The layout is ”U” shaped. the smaller leg of the “U” is a three track yard, that‘s both a destination and a “marshaling yard”, the longer part of the “U” is a destination called “HundHause” (The training kennel for our Labrador “JD” was stored under that part).

Picture number 3 shows the control panel and track layout for that piece. The control panel is loaded with multiple momentary “ON-OFF-ON” toggle switches to control track voltage, uncouplers, sound cards, etc. All the wiring is color coded (a great help for troubleshooting when Mr. Murphy and his pals the Gremlins show up).

The two legs of the “U” are connected by two tracks with one being a “WYE” to allow turning or reversing a train.

The running voltage is a constant voltage of 22 or so volts DCC (Direct Command Control) via LGB‘s MTS (Multi Train System). Each engine has a digital controller that responds to a digital address. I can run up to eight engines at the same time. There are four wireless controllers, so I can have up to four operators during a running session.

So there you have it.
Hello Jan. Thanks for posting this. Wow!!! Excellent. That is a project which must have taken years and I guess the fun thing is that it never really ends- Lovely railroad for sure. Cheers Grant
 
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Hello Jan. Thanks for posting this. Wow!!! Excellent. That is a project which must have taken years and I guess the fun thing is that it never really ends- Lovely railroad for sure. Cheers Grant
Hi Grant. I enjoy putzing on my little empire. Working out the electronics and final track configuration is a great time consumer. BUT, the wooden ship kit I received as a BD present in 2018 added a new hobby to my “leisure schedule“. I‘m absolutely fascinated by the build logs on SOS. The techniques, the research, the back and forth discussions, the humor and the final finished projects. The forum is a fantastic encyclopedia for a novice builder.
 
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@Heinrich. I think I'm getting close to placing the first plank.

5593B483-6E8B-44E5-8DF6-A8C2F0378BA8_1_201_a.jpeg

My test plank looks odd but, I use it to check the fairing on the bow blocks as well as midships. I have one question for the stern placement of the plank.

1AF68496-5D90-4884-A0E3-AD63A40649EC_1_201_a.jpeg

The plank in the circled area bows out. I'm thinking of adding material to to both sides of the bulkhead to fix that. Thoughts???
 

Heinrich

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Hi Jan. Yes you need to add material if that happens. You are in good company as @pietsan Piet also added material to Frame 10. :) That shows you have done an excellent job of fairing the hull.
 
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Hi Jan. Yes you need to add material if that happens. You are in good company as @pietsan Piet also added material to Frame 10. :) That shows you have done an excellent job of fairing the hull.
I guess my bumbling must be getting better, but I think I’m still on the bottom rung of your and Piet’s WB build ladder.
 

Heinrich

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At the moment I am not on any build ladder Jan. It is a bit frustrating but I needed to do what I needed to do.
 
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