Mega cleats!

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It must be around 36 years since my last visit to HMS Victory.
While watching a walk-through video on Yootoob I spotted a couple of gigantic cleats inside the upper gun deck.
I can't imagine what would have been secured to these cleats -- anyone have an answer to that?
Here's a screenshot >
Victory cleats.jpg
 
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I have no real idea... BUT, here's a thought..
Judging by the size (huge..), the location, and the way they're angled, I would say that MAYBE they were used as a location to manage lines (rope..) not in use. Possibly temporary location, or maybe as a looping location for drying..??
¿Quien Sabe?
o_O
 

Uwek

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Take a look at this painting shown in the link

In 1963 Christine WARBURTON was commissioned to produce a series of pen and ink sketches of HMS Victory. These pictures were issued as a 1965 Calendar and a portfolio of pictures. This Album contains the pictures from the Calendar.
 
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Hi Jim!

View attachment 174044

On this large model in Portsmouth you can see how the ropes go through the hull into the upper deck. Guess where they were moored? On the original you can't see the ropes because the Victory is not fully rigged. On her photo you can also see the double sheave.

With best regards
Thomas
You wouldn’t think that rigging would penetrate below deck around the canon like that... Almost impossible to get to, especially if you really had to in a hurry.!!
Of course, I guess “standing rigging” wouldn’t matter too much.
I’ve NEVER noticed any like this before now.!!
 
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Thanks for your comments, Howard, John, Uwe and Thomas.

Uwe ~ thanks for that informative link. Just to clarify -- on the extreme right of the drawing there are two sheaves for the main sheet. Would the main sheet have been belayed to the right hand cleat (as viewed in the drawing)?

And I have to say - you seem to be able to dredge up all kinds on information on sailing ships. I think you should write an encyclopaedia on sailing ships - it could be called "Uwepedia Of Sailing Vessels".
 
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It must be around 36 years since my last visit to HMS Victory.
While watching a walk-through video on Yootoob I spotted a couple of gigantic cleats inside the upper gun deck.
I can't imagine what would have been secured to these cleats -- anyone have an answer to that?
Here's a screenshot >
View attachment 173929




Victory cleats.jpg

It all depends which way was the Bow of the ship, if looking at the picture the bow was to the left, then the first cleat was the belaying cleat for the Main sail tack, and the second one was for the Fore sail Sheet, if you look at the link to the drawing drawing Uwe has posted the first cleat is right it is the tack of the main sail, but the second cleat that is marked the sheave of the main sheet is wrong, this is the sheave for the fore sheet, the sheave for the main sheet is right up aft,


P4060784.JPG
this is the pic that Thomas posted, and the rope marked X that is going through the hull is the Main tack, and the one marked Y is the Fore Sheet,

best regards John.
 
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Thanks for your comments, Howard, John, Uwe and Thomas.

Uwe ~ thanks for that informative link. Just to clarify -- on the extreme right of the drawing there are two sheaves for the main sheet. Would the main sheet have been belayed to the right hand cleat (as viewed in the drawing)?

And I have to say - you seem to be able to dredge up all kinds on information on sailing ships. I think you should write an encyclopaedia on sailing ships - it could be called "Uwepedia Of Sailing Vessels".

G'day Jim, the two sheaves on the right were for the Fore sheet and another rope I'm not sure which, see my post above,

best regards john,
 
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Jim's photo shows the port side from inside.

View attachment 174086
Double roller at the stern, single roller at the bow.

With best regards
Thomas

It really doesn't matter whether you are looking forward along the starboard side or aft along the port side, the double sheave is the after sheave and it is the sheave for the fore sheet,

Best regards John,
 
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Thanks guys for all your helpful comments and photos.

Thomas and John ~ I knew these lines 'disappeared' inside the hull, but I didn't know they belayed to such huge cleats!
I've had another look at that video and noticed what I assume is the other side of the ship (still inside the upper gun deck). One of these cleats has a line belayed to it and when I see the diameter of that line I can understand the need for BIG CLEATS! The video was made just last year when all but the lower masts were (still are) struck, so there wouldn't be any tacks or sheets on the ship, so perhaps that line was just belayed there to demonstrate its use for visitors?
Here's a screenshot of that occupied cleat (the neighbouring empty cleat is also in the picture) >
Victory cleats..jpg
 
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