Miniature shipyard

Jimsky

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As simple and organized as it can be! I guess, for the size of the models you build. Are you following the 'minimalism trend' popular now??? looks like no power tools is required either. What are those books consisting your library?
 

shipbuilder

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Thanks - No, I am not following any trend. It was more of a matter of convenience when I started building miniatures in the late 60s whilst at sea between early 1961 and late 1992. It was more convenient to carry miniatures home, and I found them a lot easier to build than large ones. Also more popular amongst collecters. Kits were out for me, because I prefer building the obscure or semi-obscure, all at small scales, and with no shop bought parts. The books in the picture are all bound copies of Sea Breezes, a monthly magazine that began in about 1920 and continues to this day. I have bound copes from 1921 up to the mid 1960s, but they are only a small part of my collection that is largely old technical journals about merchant shipbuilding that were disposed of by technical colleges and libraries around Britain. The model on the desk has required only a modelling scalpel and a 6 inch flat file so far! This is how the one on the desk will look - Bob



Miss Morris  (Large).jpg
 

shipbuilder

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The four switches (each with a red neon lamp over them) are the power control system. 1 turns on the desk light. 2 turns on a CD player, 3 turns on a variable DC power unit, and 4 turns on the power sockets on the right of the desk (out of the picture). The lights ensure that I don't inadvertanly leave anything on when I finish. Next to that is a small square black panel that has an aerial, earth and loudspeaker sockets with a switch where I can select the loudspeaker input (matched for 3 ohms, or via a matching transformer). Above it is a small brown panel with the output sockets for the variable power unit Next to that is the variable power unit on the bottom with a control that allows me to select any DC voltage for 0 Volts to 300 Volts. Above it is a loudspeaker connected to aerial/earth/speaker panel. Above the small square panel is a test meter connected to the variable power supply, so I can set whatever number of Volts I require. The box with the large round hole in it is empty, and has now been disposed of. I sometimes experiment with the design and construction of obsolete valve (or "tube" as you call them in the US) radios (I was a ship's radio officer at sea for over 30 years), so I like to have aerial, earth, loudspeaker and power supplies handy at the flick of a switch. Here is a radio that I designed and built. The valves (tubes) are about 90 years old, and it all works very well - Bob
Completed set 1 (Large).JPG
 

Le Capitaine

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My first transceiver was a old Swan 350 that used TV sweep tubes, 6LQ6 for finals. Used it on 40 meters and 15 meters CW. Later got a Kenwood TS 520S with a pair of 6146. Now all I have is solid state stuff!
 

shipbuilder

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I remember those valves/tubes. I only briefly had a radio amateur license. When I was sailing in the small passenger liner RMS St. Helena, I was able to purchase one on the island for £5. My call sign was ZD7RW, but of course it wasn't valid in the UK, and I wasn't going to take an exam in the UK, feeling that my professional 1st Class PMG should have been good enough! It was the PMG that issued the amateur license as well, that made it all the more ridiculous! I used a small home-made Tx on 14,060 Mhz, CW only, and once got QSL at 6,000 miles, South Atlantic Ocean to Panama! This was the sort of ship I sailed in when younger, RMS Windsor Castle, 36,000 tons. 250 first class passengers and 600 tourist. Sailed in her for 5 years as 4th radio officer, then 3rd, and finally 2nd. Other image shows me repairing the main radar when I was 2nd in 1972!

RMS Windsor Castle 1973 repairing radar.JPG Windsor Castle 1 leaving Southampton (Large).JPG
 

shipbuilder

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Yes, ZD7 was St Helena! I have built one or two models of ships I have sailed in, such as Rhodesia Star, Frederick T Everard, Ediburgh Castle, Pendennis Castle and Good Hope Castle, but only kept Rhodesia Star that was my first ship. Keeping the anchor watch aboard small passenger liner RMS St. Helena, - South Atlantic campaign, 1982/83 -
Bob
Rhodesia Star (Large).JPGPort Stanley 1982 (Medium).JPG
 

Ancientmodeller

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I remember those valves/tubes. I only briefly had a radio amateur license. When I was sailing in the small passenger liner RMS St. Helena, I was able to purchase one on the island for £5. My call sign was ZD7RW, but of course it wasn't valid in the UK, and I wasn't going to take an exam in the UK, feeling that my professional 1st Class PMG should have been good enough! It was the PMG that issued the amateur license as well, that made it all the more ridiculous! I used a small home-made Tx on 14,060 Mhz, CW only, and once got QSL at 6,000 miles, South Atlantic Ocean to Panama! This was the sort of ship I sailed in when younger, RMS Windsor Castle, 36,000 tons. 250 first class passengers and 600 tourist. Sailed in her for 5 years as 4th radio officer, then 3rd, and finally 2nd. Other image shows me repairing the main radar when I was 2nd in 1972!

View attachment 120107 View attachment 120106
Do I spy an AVO 8 Robert?
 

shipbuilder

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Yes, that is an AVO 8. It was the only test equipment we had aboard that great big passenger liner. And I was required to service all the transmitters, receivers, public address systems and radar installations - I still have my own AVO 8. I am a bit of a dinasaur! :D
Bob
 

Ancientmodeller

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I started working life in 1973. The AVO 8 was considered one of the best test meters to have. I am a diesel engineer by trade but we still had to get involved with electrickery. When I joined British Railways 7 years later the AVO 8 was still the main test instrument.
I have one too. I rescued it from being thrown away by a hospital maintenance department several years ago. I was inspecting their standby diesel driven generator at the time and noticed it gathering dust in a corner of the generator room on enquiry about it was told to take if I want it as it was destined for a skip.
 

pebbleworm

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Kinda crazy, but I think a trip from SA to Tristan da Cunha would be a blast-although limited space means you could easily get bumped from the trip you booked. I like the fact that tourists take a back seat to actual needs on that trip.
 
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