Request for help with how to handle a prooxon drilling devicedrilling

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Hello dear friends
Asking for your advice about the drill I used.
This is a used device from an old model of prooxon that I bought two months ago second hand.
Unfortunately, after about a quarter of an hour of drilling, the device heats up, smells unpleasant of burnt oil / heats up and even a little steam / transparent smoke / whitish emitted.
Of course, I turned off the device and let it cool down and then worked for shorter periods of a few minutes.
I would love to hear your opinion about the nature of the problem in the device, how to prevent its to a total destruction of the drilling device.
attached some pictures of the device.
20200926_170248.jpg20200926_170230.jpg20200926_170241.jpg
 
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the last line on the type shield says:

10min on /10 min off

...so using it for aproximatly "a quarter of an hour" - 15min, but I think the time was "guessed", not realy "measured" - might have been too long already...

other machines from Proxxon are also known to become quite hot, if used too long at a time...
 
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If so, are you familiar with the manufacturers of the equipment we need in building the models in the quality capabilities of proxxon, but are warming up much less?
 
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No, sorry, you'd better ask others around here for good machinery....

I got some of the rotary tools, disc-sander, flat-sander, drillpress, jigsaw, all Proxxon - I think they are best for modeling!
I like powered tools, but barely seem to use them when modeling ... I am always afraid to ruin something ... so I mainly use sandpaper, needlefiles, even drilling those small holes I do with my hand drill-bit

But the best buy for the tools was the foot-switch Uwek reccomanded to me! With this the rotary tool or drillpress just runs when it is realy needed, I use it more often now - and don't break that many drills as befor ;)
 
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It's an older machine and probably needs fresh grease and lubrication. Take the head off of the column and open it up. clean up any fossilized grease wherever you find it. My later TBM-115 has a plastic cover at the bottom of the head that comes off to access the motor and the spindle comes out after pulling off the pulley (WITH A GEAR PULLER!) and a bolted collar. Then re-lubricate the spindle bearings and motor bearings/bushings. Blow any accumulated dust out of the motor while you are at it and re-assemble. Spin it by hand a few times before powering it up to be sure you put it back correctly! Where exactly is the white smoke coming from?
 
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Dear pebbleworm
First of all thanks for your response and willingness to help. :) Thumbsup
I will mark in the picture the area from which the smoke comes out.20200928_141903.jpg

20200928_141903.jpg20200928_142154.jpg
If you can attach a sketch or pictures of the steps / areas I need to disassemble and clean it will help me a lot and also of the reassembly process.
Thanks a lot shota
 
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That is your motor!' It could be dirty, or it needs lubrication. You can investigate further by taking the head of the machine off, and removing the black plastic cover at the bottom. Then you can see the motor, and clean it out with canned air. If you remove the pulley and undo the two bolts at the top it will drop out. Small electric motors usually have a bearing or a bushing at each end of the rotor which will need a drop or two of sewing machine oil. It sounds like you have a lubrication problem, since the the motor starts and runs until the bearings heat up and start smoking. If the motor bearings are dry, the ones on the spindle probably are too. I couldn't find any exploded views of the machine on the web, but on my later one it's pretty self-explanatory how it goes together. There could be something as obvious as a felt oil reservoir, so look at the motor carefully before taking it apart more than you are comfortable with. Here's a video to get you started:
 
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That is your motor!' It could be dirty, or it needs lubrication. You can investigate further by taking the head of the machine off, and removing the black plastic cover at the bottom. Then you can see the motor, and clean it out with canned air. If you remove the pulley and undo the two bolts at the top it will drop out. Small electric motors usually have a bearing or a bushing at each end of the rotor which will need a drop or two of sewing machine oil. It sounds like you have a lubrication problem, since the the motor starts and runs until the bearings heat up and start smoking. If the motor bearings are dry, the ones on the spindle probably are too. I couldn't find any exploded views of the machine on the web, but on my later one it's pretty self-explanatory how it goes together. There could be something as obvious as a felt oil reservoir, so look at the motor carefully before taking it apart more than you are comfortable with. Here's a video to get you started:
Dear pebbleworm
I am very grateful to you and very much appreciate your answer to my questions.:)Thumbsup
I will watch the video soon in the next few days I will try to get a suitable engine oil and see how it affects and I will update you
.
 
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Dear pebbleworm
I saw the video and it helps in understanding the disassembly and reassembly of the product.
The question is where to put the machine oil?
 
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At the very least at the top and bottom of the motor shaft. It would be best to take off the pulley and remove the motor completely for a more thorough cleaning and evaluation, but you could get by with placing a few drops at the top shaft with the pulley in place. Depending on what your motor looks like, there may be an exposed shaft at the bottom or an oil hole. I'm sure the drill spindle also needs some lubrication too- it could be binding and putting extra stress on the motor.
 
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From the look of the belt drives she's had a hard life or been subject to acidic environment Lot of corrosion on the Aluminium Belt pulleys or is thst dried grease
 
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