Sailing ships rigs

shipbuilder

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Thanks, This is one of them, the stump t'gallant barque Caithness-Shire, and a barque with royals . But if I take any of these models to the local ship model society, they rarely get more than a casual glance. Only collecters like them! Ages since I saw anyone else build anything like this on the various forums. I am not talking about size, hardly anyone seems to build them to any scale these days -
Caithness-Shire (Medium).JPGEast African (Large).JPG
 

Terry Christian

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I admire you working in a small scale and yet produce such detail. When I worked for the comm. model maker we usually were at 1/48th scale. Anymore, 1/96 seemsvabout as small as I can go and remain calm. :) We used brass shafting for masts and spars and nylon net twine, dyed black, for rigging. The goal was longevity.
 

shipbuilder

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Thanks. My masts, spars and rigging (including ratlines) is 100% metal. The lower masts are fine brass tube, topmasts and lower spars brass rod. some upper yards copper rod and the finest ones are silver steel rod. The rigging is fine copper wire. The life-span of models is just the "luck of the draw!" Some of the models I built with these methods forty years or more ago are still in one piece, whilst others only last a few days. This one, the barque Gulf Stream was dropped by a courier on the way to the Continent, and then dropped again on the way back! A lot of the detail is illusion and it really is far quicker and easier to build miniatures, but very few modellers believe me, apart from the few who have tried and found out that it is. I have really very little patience, and my models only take 40 or 50 hours, spread over a few weeks. And that includes making the display cases and carrying cases.
Gulf Stream damage (Medium).JPG
 
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