Windsor Castle

Uwek

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Passenger and cargo ship?
I agree here with @Pathfinder65 ..... it would be good if you could write something about the ship, a little bit of history or even the type and use of it.....would be much more interesting for our members than only one historic photo and the ships name......
 
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Both. 250 passenges in 1st clas, and another 600 in tourist class. 36,000 tons, speed 22.5 knots. 730 feet long, 92.6 feet wide. Refrigerated cargo space 348,485 cubic feet. Twin screws, 45,000 horsepower, burning 250 tons of oil per day. Southampton to Cape Town in 11.5 days, I spent about five years in this ship. In 1965, we took the Southampton to Cape Town record by getting there in 10 days, that included a stop for bunkers at Las Palmas. Maiden voyage 1960. Sold 1977, but only scrapped a couple of years of so ago - Bob
 
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Both. 250 passenges in 1st clas, and another 600 in tourist class. 36,000 tons, speed 22.5 knots. 730 feet long, 92.6 feet wide. Refrigerated cargo space 348,485 cubic feet. Twin screws, 45,000 horsepower, burning 250 tons of oil per day. Southampton to Cape Town in 11.5 days, I spent about five years in this ship. In 1965, we took the Southampton to Cape Town record by getting there in 10 days, that included a stop for bunkers at Las Palmas. Maiden voyage 1960. Sold 1977, but only scrapped a couple of years of so ago - Bob
Thank you for the response and specifics on this ship.
 
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In her day, she was one of the most famous British passenger liners afloat. Once upon a time just looking at the photograph was enough to see she was a passenger liner because of the vast size of the accommodation, and the row of lifeboats, but such ships have now faded into obscurity and 36,000 tons is now regarded as tiny, but I was always overwhelmed by the sheer size. Here I am aboard, 53 years ago, one on the boat deck in the pouring rain, and another with a few of the officers, I am between the two girls - Bob Windsor Castle 1965 2.JPGWindsor Castle 1965 1.JPG
 
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A group of the officers aboard Windsor Castle in 1967. I am at the back,left, head sticking up above the rest.
Bob
Windsor Castle officers.jpg
 
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Despite all this, it was not all "sunshine and roses" in the merchant navy. Most of us had done our time on long voyages in tramp steamers etc where we could be away for two years at a stretch, in poor conditions with poor food. But the life was far more varied and interesting that in warships where it was just drills, discipline and active service from time to time. But for those who like that sort of thing, when wars did come along, the merchant navy was always ready and willing to serve, and here are a few of us in San Carlos, Falkland Islands in 1982, I am on the left, abaord a captured ship.At San Carlos 1982.jpg
Bob
 
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Stopped, and listing, after a serious engine-room fire aboard passenger liner RMS St Helena, Halloween Night, 1984. Oil tanker Overseas Argonaut standing by in case we needed to abandon. Drifted for a week before the salvage tug found us. Towed to Dakar, West Africa for repairs that took a month.
BobMorning after the fire.jpg
 
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Stopped, and listing, after a serious engine-room fire aboard passenger liner RMS St Helena, Halloween Night, 1984. Oil tanker Overseas Argonaut standing by in case we needed to abandon. Drifted for a week before the salvage tug found us. Towed to Dakar, West Africa for repairs that took a month.
BobView attachment 143230
hello - it is interesting to her the about the engine room fire on the st helena - was that the first or second one ? regards
 
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It was the first St Helena - See below. Completed in Canada in 1963 as Northland Prince. She was St Helena between 1978 and 1990. I was there from 1979 until 1990 and then we all transferred to the new ship of the same name. St Helena at St Helena after the Falklands (Large).jpg
 
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It was the first St Helena - See below. Completed in Canada in 1963 as Northland Prince. She was St Helena between 1978 and 1990. I was there from 1979 until 1990 and then we all transferred to the new ship of the same name. View attachment 143280
thank you - i have seen both the old and new st helena"s - here is the old as the avalon - i just had not heard of the fire in her engine room before - if i recall she still had her original builders plate on her throughout her life - old one
 

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I am surprised you had not heard of the fire, as it was a major incident. It started about 2230, and within half an hour, I was sending out a distress message that was answered immediately by an American ship called the Kittaning, and the British oil tanker Overseas Argonaut. Both ships altered course towards us, but the tanker was closest, and was with us by about 0130, by which time, our boats were swung out and partically lowered with all the passengers and most of the crew in them. On arrival of the tanker, we thanked Kittaning, and released her to proceed with her voyage. The engineroom was flooded with CO2 gas, and contained the fire, but we continued with hot spots and boundary cooling all the next day, ready to leave at a moment's notice. We developed a list because of all the water that had been pumped aboard to cool the engineroom bulkheads. Panelling was hacked from the passenger accommodation along the engineroom casing to get the water onto the steel casing. Next day, cooking on open fires on the foredeck using wood from the accommation, as the galley was out of action. Everyone, including a number passengers were helping carry freshwater from the tanks in buckets. After we got to Dakar, a number of older American passengers wanted to remain aboard for the repair, but weren't allowed to, so flew home, declaring they would be making further voyages as soon as we were repaired (which they did). One month for repairs and then back to Cape Town without passengers instead of returning to the UK. Cape Town - UK passengers were told that the ship was not in a very tidy state, but came anyway. Full repairs completed in the UK, and after that, I got four months leave during which time I became engaged, and got married shortly after, having our honeymoon voyage aboard. Picture - under tow for Dakar with canvas rigged forward to give us some shade during the daytime. The salvage tug can be seen ahead of us. Under tow (Large).jpg
Bob
 
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