Wool clipper Siren - of 1881

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Th British wool clipper Siren, of 1881. 32 feet to 1 inch (1:384). This iron-hulled vessel belonged to A & J H Carmichael of Greenock. She had a relatively short life, being sunk following a collison with HMS Landrail off Portland, UK on July 11th, 1896. The captain of HMS Landrail admitted blame, but the Admiralty refused to pay more than one twenteith of the ship's value! The crew lost all their private posessions.
Siren (Large).jpg
 

Pathfinder65

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Bob,

Those are absolutely great. I don’t know how you do it. I’m still trying to figure out how to tie clove hitches for rat lines.

Jan
 

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The only knots I tie are in my shoelaces!:D The rigging is all wire glued on in short lengths, no knots anywhere! Nothing could be easier!wire rigging (Large).JPG
Bob
 

Charles QC

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Thanks, always a source of wonder that so few of this type of model are ever built.
Bob
Bob I am not surprise at all.
Was at a very small show last weekend people where stopping and look, what I have to show was very basic entry level model, easy not really time consuming to build model.
We are now in a society where result as to be immediate, passing a few hour just to adjust a small parts is over the time that they are ready to invest.
What you do Bob are not only ship model they are a form of art by tem self great art. We modeller and whatever our level of skill know the work involve and do appreciate and love your work because we know.
 

rwiederrich

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The only knots I tie are in my shoelaces!:D The rigging is all wire glued on in short lengths, no knots anywhere! Nothing could be easier!View attachment 119395
Bob
Bob..are all your rigging lines painted black or is the running rigging painted brown?

I've done your technique and as you say....it's really easy...just cut the wire to length and bend in the proper sag.... paint and glue...what could be easier.

Great job and I love Olivebank….just beautiful.

Rob
 

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Thanks. It is all black. I am not all that much of a perfectionist, and at small scale no-one seems to notice anyway. :D Olivebank was made years ago, before I discovered how to set the lower square sails properly, but again, hardly anyone seems to notice! - The sails on Lord Ripon, above, are set correctly -Bob
 

rwiederrich

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Thanks. It is all black. I am not all that much of a perfectionist, and at small scale no-one seems to notice anyway. :D Olivebank was made years ago, before I discovered how to set the lower square sails properly, but again, hardly anyone seems to notice! - The sails on Lord Ripon, above, are set correctly -Bob

Yeah...all black probably works best and keeps it simple. I'm not following you about the lower sails not being set correctly....how are they NOT? I'd hate to think I'm one who *Hardly* notices.

Rob
 

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I was the same for many years. If you look at the Olivebank above, both clews of each of the lowest square sails are taken aft., and they look awkward, although they could occasionally set them like that, most of the time the lee clews were made fast aft, but the weather ones were made fast forward. Here is an example of the correct setting, and it certainly looks a lot better. I seldom see correctly set lower squars sails on model ships, but as I said, I set them incorrectly for years.
Bob


Svaerdstad.jpg
 
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