"32 gun Frigate USS ESSEX - Building A Plank-On-Frame Model" - Planset + booklet by Portia Takakjian

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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I went back and looked at the drawings I have, they were originally based on the drawings done by Portia Takakjian the originals were way off and needed to be refined.

here is the deal

Portia originally used an English style of framing that was not used in North America and she took a lot of slack for using it. The framing was double frames with 2 single frames between the doubles. She said she used it just because she like it and not for any historical correctness.

essex1.JPG

I thought maybe the original plans could be easy corrected for North American framing which was all double frames.

the light colored maroon frames are the original so I thought leaving everything and just take the two singles and bring them together as a double like the blue frames. Now all a builder has to do is change the notches in the keel. The problem here is the frames are way to far apart.



In the book Anatomy of Ship she changed the framing to the light red.
to do this framing you are bringing all the frames closer together so you have to add more frames which will require doing all the frame patterns over again.

but even the redo in the Essex book there are a number of historical errors and Model Expo sells a confederacy kit with the wrong type of framing so hey how correct do we need to be? this comes down to your call.

essex2.JPG

the original set of drawings are more folk art and not a historical representation of the Essex.
As a model builder who cares? but there is a group of snobs out there who ran people like Harold Hahn and Portia out of town on a rail for stylized framing and not sticking to strict historical correctness.
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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actually if your building a plank on bulkhead then you can avoid all the framing issues and use the double frames as bulkheads
 
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Hello Everyone,

I hope I can join this discussion as I too am working on the Essex. I started her In November 2014 and placed her in storage in June 2016. The reason for putting her in storage was due to getting stationed in Grafenwoehr, Germany and decided to travel super-lite.

To be honest with everyone, I rather liked Portia's take on the Essex's framework. I did not know that it was a double frame followed by two single frames. The way I saw it was every third frame was a larger one, mind you that I was still wet behind the ears when I decided to take her on as a scratch build model (yes, I live by that new adage, "Go big or go home").

I am soon to retire from the Army so I will have the opportunity to get back to her and get reacquainted again (she does have sexy curves). The following short cut will take you to my build log over at Model Ship Builder if anyone is interested in taking a look.

http://modelshipbuilder.com/e107_plugins/forum/forum_viewtopic.php?19340

While I agree that using a build board for models is a convenience, I prefer using my gantry and have had great success with it. I have also used Portia's drawing and have already carved the Indian figure head (it is not Janos quality but I am happy with it). Many thanks to all who will listen and I look forward to seeing everyone else's input on this fascinating topic.
 

Uwek

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Hello Everyone,

I hope I can join this discussion as I too am working on the Essex. I started her In November 2014 and placed her in storage in June 2016. The reason for putting her in storage was due to getting stationed in Grafenwoehr, Germany and decided to travel super-lite.

To be honest with everyone, I rather liked Portia's take on the Essex's framework. I did not know that it was a double frame followed by two single frames. The way I saw it was every third frame was a larger one, mind you that I was still wet behind the ears when I decided to take her on as a scratch build model (yes, I live by that new adage, "Go big or go home").

I am soon to retire from the Army so I will have the opportunity to get back to her and get reacquainted again (she does have sexy curves). The following short cut will take you to my build log over at Model Ship Builder if anyone is interested in taking a look.

http://modelshipbuilder.com/e107_plugins/forum/forum_viewtopic.php?19340

While I agree that using a build board for models is a convenience, I prefer using my gantry and have had great success with it. I have also used Portia's drawing and have already carved the Indian figure head (it is not Janos quality but I am happy with it). Many thanks to all who will listen and I look forward to seeing everyone else's input on this fascinating topic.

In Grafenwöhr i was also stationed 30 years ago with the Bundeswehr, but only for a short time......
It is there, where the fox and the rabbit are saying „good night“ to each other......
We can only hope, that your retirements starts early, so you can proceed with your beautifull model....
Would be great, if you would show your work here in a building log....
 
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In Grafenwöhr i was also stationed 30 years ago with the Bundeswehr, but only for a short time......
It is there, where the fox and the rabbit are saying „good night“ to each other......
We can only hope, that your retirements starts early, so you can proceed with your beautifull model....
Would be great, if you would show your work here in a building log....
Thank you Uwe. I must admit that it is quite beautiful over here. I also enjoy the enjoy the schnitzels and the hefeweizens, but I must confess that I have to be careful for fear of gaining to much weight.
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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taking another look at a possible 2.0 redesign of the Lumberyards kit of the Essex

the original kit was based on Portia's original framing of a double bend and single filler frames. That is not historically how hulls were built in North America. Then She changed the framing as all double frame in the Admiralty series book on the Essex. Portia added chocks which again were not used in north American ship construction the frame futtocks were butt to one another, and finally she showed frames that narrowed as they reached the top, this again was a British practice, American ship frames did not tapper they were the same from keel to rail.

so far there are no known revised model builder drawings of her originals published in the Model Ship Builder article.
in a new version of the Lumberyard kit a jig would be designed for the framing and the framing changed from the original drawings.
 
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back then Don there was an anti-Hahn movement. The self proclaimed master builders insisted building a ship upside down in a jig was not how real ship were built, thus a model ship should be built like a real ship. Model ship building and actual ship building are totally two different things and finally after a hard fought battle the jig method won out. There are still a few hold outs and refuse to build a model in a jig but they are becoming less and less. The Essex and Oneida followed the trend back then and you right they should have been up graded to the jig method.
I somehow managed to build the Oneida after making a jig as suggested on a Navy Board Models forum US brig. Eagle blog about 7 years ago - it was difficult, frustrating but ultimately extremely satisfying and after some routine kits returned to learn via the Hanna (with Hunt practicum) and plan to continue with semi or full scratch builds because of this personal satisfaction, although the non builders appear to appreciate them less as they look "unfinished"
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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I think if the new 2.0 Essex kit is plank on frame it should be built in a jig either upside down or a jig where the hull sets into it.

the first question is to remain loyal to Portia's original model or modify it to a more historically correct framing?
 
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Dave, My thoughts about the jig, if i had my preference it would be the kind you had for the CAUSTIC, but eitherone is OK my me as i have completed the HALIFAX with the upside down jig, my unbuilt ONEDIA still waiting for a jig for it, looking forward to this with high antisapation, how about copying the chinese and offer upgrades, and revisions not keeping the 30 and 40 year models the same old same old, just my 5 cents. Don
 

zoly99sask

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I think if the new 2.0 Essex kit is plank on frame it should be built in a jig either upside down or a jig where the hull sets into it.

the first question is to remain loyal to Portia's original model or modify it to a more historically correct framing?
Probably more historically correct framing would be better ,not limited only to the framing
 
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I agree with Zoltan, I think correcting/updating the whole model to be historically correct would be the way to go.
 
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