#6 Support: Installation of inner gunwale and simulation of fastenings.

Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
Planking fastening simulation ...

Test

20200723_225030 a.jpg

Well all I can say is that working on this is definitely a personal choice: knowing that many modelers may not like the look once work has been completed.
The other thing is .... once you start .... there is no going back. So think long and hard before going into it.

It is a long process, many hours will be spent on this.
Close-up view before finishing.

_DSC1172 aa.jpg

And the tools used.

_DSC1161 aa.jpg

G.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
Well, one side is done...
It took a little over 10 hours and more than half the nails still need sanding because right now it looks and feel like one of those combs used on pets to remove loose hair. Eventually everything will be flush with the strip-planking.

So now, it will be a repeat of the process on the other side.

_DSC1181 aa.jpg

Of course this is not common practice but since the process may be of interest to some for future projects, why not ... it is a good way to gain some training ....

G
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
Marking the location of the nails on the outside of the hull following the rib layout:

20200802_121531 aa.jpg

Once the location of the holes have been marked, each hole is pre-drilled (approximately 1/16" or 1.5 mm deep).
The brass wire / rod is then inserted into the hole and clipped.

20200802_123142 aa.jpg

A view of the clipped "nails":

20200803_164213 aa.jpg

The nails are then sanded down: using a very light touch.
And the result:

20200803_164243 aa.jpg

The image above was taken using a phone with a flash.
Under normal viewing conditions, the nails are surely there but barely noticeable.

_DSC1186 aa.jpg

G
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
Some may find that a little too much time is spent on this optional step in the construction of the canoe model as it is not even done or represents a traditional feature of such vessel.
Yes, some time is spent describing this step and no, it is not even a true representation of how the planks should be fastened in a 1:1 scale canoe should anyone want to accurately show these details.

In any case, a couple of videos:

1st, a view of the nails after installation and before sanding...

View attachment 20200804_093958.mp4





















And what it actually looks like once sanding has been done ...

View attachment 20200804_094217.mp4




















Hopefully some may find this topic instructive...
G.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
Installation of the simulated fastenings on the planking.

Here is a series of short videos showing the process.
Please note that these steps take place one vertical row of nails at a time: except were indicated otherwise...

1) marking the location of the nails onto the planking. The vertical rows follow the location of the ribs.

View attachment marking location.mp4





















2) drilling the holes

View attachment holes.mp4





















3) inserting the nails

View attachment Insert nails.mp4





















4) Filing
If sanding with paper, this can be done after having installed all the nails (as indicated in previous post), or by area.
If using a file, you may find it easier to work row by row: this is how I am doing it on this particular canoe.

View attachment filing 2.mp4





















I hope this helps...

G.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,114
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
Installation of the simulated fastenings on the planking.

Here is a series of short videos showing the process.
Please note that these steps take place one vertical row of nails at a time: except were indicated otherwise...

1) marking the location of the nails onto the planking. The vertical rows follow the location of the ribs.

View attachment 173880





















2) drilling the holes

View attachment 173881





















3) inserting the nails

View attachment 173882





















4) Filing
If sanding with paper, this can be done after having installed all the nails (as indicated in previous post), or by area.
If using a file, you may find it easier to work row by row: this is how I am doing it on this particular canoe.

View attachment 173883





















I hope this helps...

G.
I am a visual learner so the clips are appreciated. PT-2
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,114
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
I am a visual learner so the clips are appreciated. PT-2
I greatly admire the precision of your planking. For my first canoe mine is more irregular, (some of the strips are not fully edge butted but corbeled, off-set as in masonry construction, possibly initiated by some irregularities with my forms which compound the problem as I progressed. Just completing the sides and twisting of the more flat to vertical stem last connections and will try your pins to fasten at the stems recommendation. I found that the strip tries to pull out following the pin itself so I need to try to insert it at more of an angle. At this point I'll finish the 19" learner and do a second 17" applying lessons learned and hoping for better results. Your videos and images are good clarifications as I progress as I am a visual learner. Thanks. PT-2
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
I greatly admire the precision of your planking. For my first canoe mine is more irregular, (some of the strips are not fully edge butted but corbeled, off-set as in masonry construction, possibly initiated by some irregularities with my forms which compound the problem as I progressed. Just completing the sides and twisting of the more flat to vertical stem last connections and will try your pins to fasten at the stems recommendation. I found that the strip tries to pull out following the pin itself so I need to try to insert it at more of an angle. At this point I'll finish the 19" learner and do a second 17" applying lessons learned and hoping for better results. Your videos and images are good clarifications as I progress as I am a visual learner. Thanks. PT-2

Thank you.

You can also use your regular wood glue and a drop of CA glue at the stem, then hold it by hand for a minute or 2. Clamps are difficult to use in this area (turn of the stem), but you can also try to use a thick rubber band against the wood on the canoe and around the building base and a clamp over the rubber, it might hold it in place.

G
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,114
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
Thank you.

You can also use your regular wood glue and a drop of CA glue at the stem, then hold it by hand for a minute or 2. Clamps are difficult to use in this area (turn of the stem), but you can also try to use a thick rubber band against the wood on the canoe and around the building base and a clamp over the rubber, it might hold it in place.

G
I used the large rubber band to help restrain some of the earlier strips supplementing the spring metal clips. I was staying away from CA but will use that to help in the stem turn where I am now working. I think that the next strips will be dry-fit, trimmed and then installed. There will be a lot of sanding to even the strips out so I'll have to proceed very carefully as some strips have more of the corner in contact than an edge. This is all in learning and then moving forward in a better manner on the second canoe. Already spending money as I hear the rapids ahead when not even arriving at that turn in the canyon. . . just anticipating what the noise will be about. PT-2
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2019
Messages
622
Points
353

Location
Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada
Finishing the sheer.

The ribs were installed and trimmed down. Then the inner-gunwales were glued in place.
At this point the ribs should still be sticking out a bit, but they need to be trimmed down further to be flush with the other parts forming the sheer line: the inner-gunwale, planking and outer gunwale. Eventually everything will be sanded smooth.
Unless the ribs are trimmed as close as possible to the other parts, there is a chance that some will become unglued and move or even break.
So to trim then down I used a sharp knife.
Here is an image showing one side of the canoe trimmed (closest to the camera) and the other not Further back:

_DSC2081 aa.jpg

Once trimmed, the sheer can be sanded down: I use 180 grit paper first to make the surface even (inner-gunwale, ribs, planking and outer-gunwale) then 320 grit paper. The joints between all these parts should be clean: not cracks, no depressions, nothing sticking out.

And here is the result:

_DSC2087 aa.jpg

You can see the images a bit larger by clicking on them.

G.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,114
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
Finishing the sheer.

The ribs were installed and trimmed down. Then the inner-gunwales were glued in place.
At this point the ribs should still be sticking out a bit, but they need to be trimmed down further to be flush with the other parts forming the sheer line: the inner-gunwale, planking and outer gunwale. Eventually everything will be sanded smooth.
Unless the ribs are trimmed as close as possible to the other parts, there is a chance that some will become unglued and move or even break.
So to trim then down I used a sharp knife.
Here is an image showing one side of the canoe trimmed (closest to the camera) and the other not Further back:

View attachment 176002

Once trimmed, the sheer can be sanded down: I use 180 grit paper first to make the surface even (inner-gunwale, ribs, planking and outer-gunwale) then 320 grit paper. The joints between all these parts should be clean: not cracks, no depressions, nothing sticking out.

And here is the result:

View attachment 176003

You can see the images a bit larger by clicking on them.

G.
I think that a lot of the final result is made possible by your: care in cutting the stations and setting the strips tightly against those and the edges together. Both were not as they should have been in this my first attempt, so the quality of this late stage trim and sanding did not turn out as well as I would have liked and in comparison with your massive canoe build experience. You photos and guidance provides me with the resources to do better next time. PT-2
 
Top