900-ton wooden barque

Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
1,110
Points
383

16th April, 2020
A nine -hundred ton barque of my own design - and I am very pleased at how it is coming along The three cargo hatches and the fife rails round fore and main masts have been fitted. The wheelbox and wheel still need to be made, plus the windlass, forecastle scuttle and various other small deck details.
BobDSCF6603 (Large).JPG
 
Joined
Apr 21, 2018
Messages
109
Points
78

Looking forward to the rest of it Bob. Full hull too. Will you be doing a build log?
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
1,110
Points
383

Thanks - No build log - insufficient interest! I will be making one of my downloads about it, and maybe incorporate it into a new book.
Bob
 
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
39
Points
78

Location
Chatham Kent, Ontario Canada
I am always amazed at the scale in which you work. You have the steady hands and eye sight of a 20 year old. Smallest scale that I work with is 1/72. Beautiful job Bob, as usual.
Jim
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
1,110
Points
383

Thanks - If only it were true!:D My hands are steady enough, but my eyesight is far from being like a 20-year old. Last September, I had major eye surgery on the right eye that took 1 hour, forty minutes, and it was like looking through water for the next two or three weeks, before it settled down again. But the left eye can hardly read, even with glasses, although it is fairly normal at distances of over six feet. Then laser surgery on left eye on Christmas Eve. That is the reason I have gone onto the larger scale of 20 feet to 1 inch that I find OK. I can also manage 25 feet to 1 inch without a great deal of trouble, but hope to get back to 32 feet to 1 inch eventually. The one pictured belwo was completely re-rigged after the surgery (a courier dropped it!:() and was easy enough at 25 feet to 1 inch. This model is easy enough, so as long as I can carry on building them, I am happy enough. I don't have the patience or space to even consider building large ones, and kits are a complete turn-off for me, as I have always preferred peaceful trading vessels on account of their more interesting histories. I wrote a book on building it whilst I couldn't see properly. (about a month).:) It is all a matter of "I can do it" rather than "I could never do that!"
Bob


Gulf Stream damage (Medium).JPGGulf Stream port quarter (Medium).JPG:)
 
Joined
Mar 17, 2018
Messages
239
Points
213

Location
UK
Thanks - If only it were true!:D My hands are steady enough, but my eyesight is far from being like a 20-year old. Last September, I had major eye surgery on the right eye that took 1 hour, forty minutes, and it was like looking through water for the next two or three weeks, before it settled down again. But the left eye can hardly read, even with glasses, although it is fairly normal at distances of over six feet. Then laser surgery on left eye on Christmas Eve. That is the reason I have gone onto the larger scale of 20 feet to 1 inch that I find OK. I can also manage 25 feet to 1 inch without a great deal of trouble, but hope to get back to 32 feet to 1 inch eventually. The one pictured belwo was completely re-rigged after the surgery (a courier dropped it!:() and was easy enough at 25 feet to 1 inch. This model is easy enough, so as long as I can carry on building them, I am happy enough. I don't have the patience or space to even consider building large ones, and kits are a complete turn-off for me, as I have always preferred peaceful trading vessels on account of their more interesting histories. I wrote a book on building it whilst I couldn't see properly. (about a month).:) It is all a matter of "I can do it" rather than "I could never do that!"
Bob


View attachment 144432View attachment 144433:)
Superb modelling - well done!
Ted
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
1,110
Points
383

As I said, a courier dropped it on its way to Belgium. They then managed to drop it again on the way back. This is all that I could salvage of the wreck. I refunded the buyer and decided to keep it after the repair, so it is still here. It had only been completed a few days when they dropped it!:mad: Insurance did not pay out the full amount, so I lost heavily as I refunded the whole lot, including the £70 it cost me to send it there. I then wrote a book on building it to try and recover my losses, so in the end, everything was OK, but it was an awful lot of unnecessary work, and I will no longer send them anywhere with couriers! It was harder to repair than build, because it was stuck in the sea, and I had to be careful not to damage that.

All that I could salvage.JPG
 
Joined
Mar 17, 2018
Messages
239
Points
213

Location
UK
As I said, a courier dropped it on its way to Belgium. They then managed to drop it again on the way back. This is all that I could salvage of the wreck. I refunded the buyer and decided to keep it after the repair, so it is still here. It had only been completed a few days when they dropped it!:mad: Insurance did not pay out the full amount, so I lost heavily as I refunded the whole lot, including the £70 it cost me to send it there. I then wrote a book on building it to try and recover my losses, so in the end, everything was OK, but it was an awful lot of unnecessary work, and I will no longer send them anywhere with couriers! It was harder to repair than build, because it was stuck in the sea, and I had to be careful not to damage that.

View attachment 145194
Ouch!:oops:
Devastating to see something destroyed like that. I never trust couriers - I once went to a local depot looking for a boat that was being sent to me; they couldn't find it, but were throwing boxes everywhere from a huge pile. They eventually did deliver - all the corners of the box were stove in, and the boat was only good for firewood.
Ted
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
1,110
Points
383

The Gulf Stream was the final straw. They now have to be collected personally, which of course wipes out my international customers. And even so, the lockdown wipes out my local customers as well for the moment. I have not had many breakages over the years, but each one was quite a blow mentally, as well as financially. But as I have said many times before, I only sell them because we don't have the space to keep them all.
Damaged in transit.JPG
 
Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Messages
1,149
Points
443

Location
Maine, USA
The Gulf Stream was the final straw. They now have to be collected personally, which of course wipes out my international customers. And even so, the lockdown wipes out my local customers as well for the moment. I have not had many breakages over the years, but each one was quite a blow mentally, as well as financially. But as I have said many times before, I only sell them because we don't have the space to keep them all.
View attachment 145364
Sort of reminds one of the models that are aged and weathered. I’ve looked to see if there is a tiny periscope somewhere in the water.

Jan
 
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
39
Points
78

Location
Chatham Kent, Ontario Canada
In 2008 I was commissioned by the ship yard I worked for to build a 1/4 inch to the foot model of the new fire tug they were building for the city of Baltimore. The yard had planed to send the model to the West Coast for display at a trade show they were involved in. I had carefully wrapped it in bubble wrap, put it inside its' glass case, put that case inside a very sturdy wooden case and insulated the inside with heavy styrofoam. The yard had arranged for it to be sent by courier, and by the time it arrived the wooden case, glass case, and model had been completely destroyed. I have no idea what they did to it outside of running over it with a truck to cause that much damage. It was heavily insured, and the courier service did pay to have another built, but the ship yard lost the opportunity to display it at the trade show.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
1,110
Points
383

Here is another one. I did not build this though. It is a professionally built model of my last the, RMS St. Helena. A courier dropped it, and the builders were too busy. so the company asked me. I put it all back together again. It must have been dropped from quite a great height, because the display case was made from quite thick acrylic sheet, that takes a lot of breaking! The first picture shows it after I had completed the repair -

RMS St Helena After.JPG to repair it,

Damaged in transit.JPG
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
8
Points
8

Tragic - Couriers have no respect for their deliveries
Ted
Pues aquí en España pasa lo mismo. Mandas por una empresa de paquetería un modelo, a la escala que sea bien empaquetado con su vitrina de cianicrilato que es un material muy duro, y llega completamente destrozado. Un saludo muy cordial para todos, Joserra Iturriarte (joserraitu)

Well here in Spain the same thing happens. You send a model by a parcel company, on a scale that is well packaged with its cyanicrylate display case, which is a very hard material, and arrives completely destroyed. A very cordial greeting to all, Joserra Iturriarte (joserraitu)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top