Bibigon's Trivia or Tips and Tricks as per Sergey Trubchaninov

Jimsky

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All hands on deck!
How many times do we struggle to find a better\simplier way to make our own parts for our hobby? I don't know about you, but personally, often times I cannot come to an agreement with myself using one method over another. Sergey Trubchaninov, well known on the Russian ship model forums as Bibigon use to have his personal column "Bibigon's Trivia" where his showed photos (step-by-step) of how to make your own ship fightings using available tools and materials.
Some time back, he was banned from the forum and all his data was deleted. However, his friends were able to recover some of his data. Today, I have a chance, obviously with Sergey's permission, to publish some of his work. He believes those tips and tricks may greatly help someone to get one step further to become a scratch builder by making their own parts.

Here is one of his saved build log (sorry Russian language), but the photos are pretty much don't need explanations for the most part. If you have any question, I would more than glad to help translate: http://forum.modelsworld.ru/topic7752.html

All transcript is written in Russian, so it will take some time to translate. I will try to translate as close as the original document. Some of the pictures not good quality but most of them really good. Alright, enough intrigues... Let me show you the first one.

Making hooks with a ring

The task was to make so they look great, using a minimum of tools and materials available. Everything made using the rotary tool. I have brass, but an even more accessible material is a steel electrode (in Russia, comments by Jim) that I was using for manufacturing.

Materials, tools, and steps we will have to take.

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to be continued...with part 2

-Jim for Bibigon
 
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Jimsky

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Production of a faceted end of any square profiles

This jig can be made rather quickly (as seen on the photos). It designed for mass production of the faceted end of any square profiles. There is a small inconvenience - for each square size, you will need to make its own jig.

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When making metal treenail top out of brass, the Jig is made of brass. Moreover, the stop screw does not have to be the size of the rod. First, a guide hole is drilled from the inside of the stop and then drilled from the outside under the existing screw. Once you have made a top to your satisfaction, you can cut the desired length.

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Use it or lose it! Hope this will comes handy...
 

Jimsky

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Hello shipwrights! I would like to continue with Sergey's tips and his jigs, and today, we will make hinges for gunports lids. Imagine you are building a model with 74 guns. This yeds a number of gunport lids, each consists 2 hinges. With simple math and you have to make 148 hinges! Here Sergey shows his method of making mass production of hinges.
* Make available a sheet of copper or brass 0.35mm ~ 0.4mm. Dimensions of the sheet will dictate the length of the hinge. On the sheet, vertical lines will represent the hinges themselves, and horizontal the marks for the bolt holes.

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Using a plexiglass cutter make a straight groove (do not make it too deep). This groove will help to bend 90 degrees. Using the machine wise, bend 90 degrees (see photo below)

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Attach the sheet to the hardwood blank using bolts. Once sheet secured solder the tube to the sheet. One of the marks becomes a groove and will help to keep the tubing in place while soldering. I believe he uses the soft thin alloy solder for this exercise. *make sure to insert a wire inside a tubing, This wire should be the same diameter as the inside tubing or slightly less (preferably the same)

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The next picture will explain the process of cleaning excess solder left using the table saw blade. After cleaning is done, using the same blade he cuts individual hinges. Please note the highs of the saw blade. It doesn't touch the tubing, only cut sheet. Here you understand why did you need to secure sheet using bolts (or screws).

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to be continued...
 

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We left cutting individual hinges. The next step is to drill holes for the bolts (or bolt imitation). Using the earlier marks and a light touch of a sharp awl, he uses pin wise and drill bit of 0.4mm diameter to procure holes. Please note, he uses each other strip, as hinges have two parts: the one goes to the gunport lid, another in the hull (actually gunport frame).

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The next step using jewelers saw cut individual hinges. remember we bent 90 degrees, this part will hold them together while we will cut individual hinges pair.

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Once everything straightens out using wise (photo above) we cut the excess to make a final hinge set.

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....and the final results are (below)

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I hope this was informative and comes handy, Enjoy!!!!
 

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Another great, yet simple jig made by Sergey @bibigon for fabricating spokes for the Steering gear. Let's begin...

First, determine the size and configuration of the spoke, making a sketch. Based on the spokes pattern we will need to make the cutter out of an old Olfa knife\blade (could be any suitable dull blade). Using the cutting disk we shape the tool (cutter)

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out of hardwood making the tool rest. Here we drill the hole with the diameter of the paper binder. Cut the slot alone the hole, so one side of the binder slides (see photo below). A simple lathe made out of Proxxon flexible shaft held by two wooden blocks. NOTE that the hights of the tool rest (discussed earlier) should be the center of the chuck.

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The rest is self-explanatory. Insert a round blank (pearwood), using the second side of the bending clip as the cover holder. Gently Incert cutter until the shape made. Using the hardwood stick, clean the shape. Done!! Slide for the next one... This tool can be used to make the belaying pins as well. All you need to make another cutter with a belying pin shape.

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Thank you @bibigon Sergey!
 
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