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Build Log: HMS Endeavour Captain Longboat

Jeff W

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Mar 17, 2019
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48

Hello there, finally got around to post some photos of my first project and my work area. It took a long while for me to get to this point in the build ... a lot to learn and very cautious ... once again thanks for the advice and resources, has been invaluable.01.JPG
 

Jeff W

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Mar 17, 2019
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Thanks for replys :) A couple of questions :rolleyes:, should I indicate nailing everywhere on the model? and do the decking timbers extend the length of the boat or should I indicate sections of timber?
 

Charles QC

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Aug 16, 2019
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Is that an A.L kit??
Well those type of small boat are difficult to do as you have to be careful of the planking, as inside and outside are visible and you did it first classThumbsup
 

Jeff W

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Mar 17, 2019
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Today I finished remaking and attaching the gunwale covers. The gunwale covers were originally one piece each for both sides of the boat but did not fit the way they should, so I divided each into 3 sections to enable realignment (I could have done it better I think, I rushed it a bit unfortunately and forgot to align the joints over a bulwark and the joints aren't all as tight as they should be..oh well next time). Anyway, got the seats in and the mast base structures in. I modified the main mast base structure to be the same as the front one so it doesn't sit on the deck, seemed odd to not make that adjustment. It wasn't as easy to do as I thought either, well more time consuming if anything. Now approaching the fitting out of the boat and making the oars, so that will be interesting.09.JPG
 

Jeff W

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Mar 17, 2019
Messages
17
Points
48

Made the oars.

10.JPG

Also installed the oar locks, not satisfied though. In wondering how the oars were actually used with said oar locks, I did some digging about the internet, and found that they are actually called thole pins and oars were loosely lashed to them to enable rowing and safeguard the oars from being lost when unattended. The diagram below illustrates this. Well it appears such a configuration was not used for this boat along with a number of other issues detailed in this AL kit.

Thole pins lashing.jpg
 
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Jimsky

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Hello Jeff. Here is what Wikipedia said:
rowlock[1] UK: /ˈrɒlək/, sometimes spur (due to the similarity in shape and size), oarlock (USA)[2] or gate (Australia) is a brace that attaches an oar to a boat. When a boat is rowed, the rowlock acts as a fulcrum, and, in doing so, the propulsive force that the rower exerts on the water with the oar is transferred to the boat by the thrust force exerted on the rowlock.

On ordinary rowing craft, the rowlocks are attached to the gunwales. In the sport of rowing, the rowlocks are attached to outriggers (often just called "riggers"), which project from the boat and provide greater leverage. In sport rowing, the rowlocks are normally U-shaped and attached to a vertical pin which allows the rowlock to pivot around the pin during the rowing stroke. They additionally have a locking mechanism (properly known as "the gate") across the top of the "U" to prevent the oar from unintentionally popping out of the rowlock.

Originally, rowlocks were two wooden posts or thole pins that the shaft of the oar nestled between. Single THOLE PINS may be used when the oars have holes cut into the loom which then sits over/around the THOLE PIN. (Captain Dennis Robinson FNI, Master Mariner)

46.png vmesto_uklyuchiny.jpg

hope this will help.
 

Jeff W

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Mar 17, 2019
Messages
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Points
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Within Karl Heinz Marquardt's enlightening book "The Anatomy of the Ship Captain Cooks Endeavour" are plans of four small vessels that were taken on the HM Bark Endeavour, namely, a longboat, a pinnace, a yawl and a skiff (all of which I am considering reproducing on an AL Endeavour kit I am keen to get started on soon). A copy of the longboat plan from this book, see below, shows that there was actually or dual thole pin configuration for each oar lock location. As you can see there are other anomalies when comparing the kit to the plan. There is a windlass (14), a stern-sheets bench (7), footwaling (8) - is not spaced as elsewhere (16), transom knee (5). Curious to also find there were 3 different sail configurations that were used for the vessel, it appears they were able to interchange the sails and masts of all four vessels! Interesting. There are a few other design differences, anyway, maybe that's a matter for a scratch build for someone, hmmm.

11.JPG
 
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Jeff W

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Joined
Mar 17, 2019
Messages
17
Points
48

Hello Jeff. Here is what Wikipedia said:
rowlock[1] UK: /ˈrɒlək/, sometimes spur (due to the similarity in shape and size), oarlock (USA)[2] or gate (Australia) is a brace that attaches an oar to a boat. When a boat is rowed, the rowlock acts as a fulcrum, and, in doing so, the propulsive force that the rower exerts on the water with the oar is transferred to the boat by the thrust force exerted on the rowlock.

On ordinary rowing craft, the rowlocks are attached to the gunwales. In the sport of rowing, the rowlocks are attached to outriggers (often just called "riggers"), which project from the boat and provide greater leverage. In sport rowing, the rowlocks are normally U-shaped and attached to a vertical pin which allows the rowlock to pivot around the pin during the rowing stroke. They additionally have a locking mechanism (properly known as "the gate") across the top of the "U" to prevent the oar from unintentionally popping out of the rowlock.

Originally, rowlocks were two wooden posts or thole pins that the shaft of the oar nestled between. Single THOLE PINS may be used when the oars have holes cut into the loom which then sits over/around the THOLE PIN. (Captain Dennis Robinson FNI, Master Mariner)

View attachment 116667 View attachment 116668

hope this will help.
Thanks Jimsky for that explanation, most appreciated, certainly fills in some gaps in my knowledge for sure! Was trying to find that info without much success. One question I have is that with the twin thole pins did they use lashings for the oars on those as well?
 

Jimsky

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Thanks Jimsky for that explanation, most appreciated, certainly fills in some gaps in my knowledge for sure! Was trying to find that info without much success. One question I have is that with the twin thole pins did they use lashings for the oars on those as well?
I don't think so... I believe the lashing didn't require. Think about it, it will make moving oar quite difficult (if not impossible at all). In the case of 1 pin, the rope help avoiding loses the oars. Two pins will hold the oar in-place. One of the methods, when hole made in the oar then inserted in to the pin mounted on the boat.
 
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