Can you rip planking with a table/bench mounted band saw.

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I've been looking at all the smaller table and bench mounted power saws and I'm curious if using one of these small band saws would be OK for ripping planking?

I know a small table saw would be much better for that, but I'm looking for a little versatility. The band saw would also give me the ability to rough cut larger pieces that I could file/sand into shape.

Or would I be better off getting a small table saw for things I needed to rip and a scroll saw for the more detailed work?

I don't have a lot of space to work with, so the fewer tools like this the better.

Also, how loud are these saws? I'll be rigging up my 2 HP shop vac in some form or fashion while using these saws, are these saws louder than that 2 HP shop vac?

Thanks.
 
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Hi Toleolu,

A band saw can be a very versatile machine, I don't have one, I know other guys on this site do and would be better placed to give advice.

The combination I have is Byrnes table saw and a scroll saw, both of which are what I would call quiet while in operation, by the way I find my Byrnes saw fantastic.

Your dust extractor will be a lot noisier, at least my one is, I have what is really an industrial vacuum cleaner with a Festo label on it.

Cheers,
Stephen.
 
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TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION, YES I HAVE BEEN USING A DESK TOP 9 IN BAND SAW PERFORMAX FROM MENARDS FOR QUITE A WHILE THE PRICE WHEN IT GOT IT WAS GREAT IT HAS GONE UP SOME BUT STILL A SWEET DEAL I NO LONGER HAVE THE TABLE SAWS NOT WORTH BTHE PRICE FOR WHAT YOU GET, MY BAND SAW CAN RIP PLANKS DOW TO ABOUT 1/16 INCH BESIDES CUTTING FRAMES AND WITH A BLADE CHARE RE SAWING WOOD, AS WELL AS OTHER STUFF BESIDES MODELING WELL WORTH IT WITH FENCE AND MITER GAUGE WORKS GREAT, HOPE THIS HELPS. GOD BLESS STAY SAFE ALL DON
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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i agree with Don a band saw is the most versatile you can do way more with it than a hobby size table saw. With the right blade a 9 inch band saw works just as well as a scroll saw.
you can also rip down 1 inch lumber with a 9 inch band saw which you can not do on a small table saw.
 
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If you are into the hobby for the long haul and are going to cut a lot of your own planking I would also second the Byrnes saw, and a good ( Byrnes) thickness sander as well… both of mine have gone 22+ years now and I have only replaced one power switch….
 
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Thanks to all.

The Byrnes products look really good, especially that thickness sander. Definitely something to consider.

@donfarr

Thanks for the tip on the Performax band saw. It's got me thinking that might be the way to go to start. I have no doubt it will handle my shape cutting needs, nothing real intricate right now, and if it turns out I'm not real happy with how well it rips planking, I can always add a small table saw later.
 
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Bandsaws are great for ripping and resawing thin stock whereas a tablesaw is great for ripping larger lumber. Both saws have their advantages and disadvantages. If you have a question about a specific method or procedure, or need help on a setup, let me know. I have been woodworking since 1962....
 
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Bandsaws are great for ripping and resawing thin stock whereas a tablesaw is great for ripping larger lumber. Both saws have their advantages and disadvantages. If you have a question about a specific method or procedure, or need help on a setup, let me know. I have been woodworking since 1962....
Philski,
I have purchased a Proxxon table saw and a Byrnes thickness sander along with belt/disc sander, scroll saw and a Proxxon mini mill. I also have a Proxxon mini lathe.
These are all recent purchases as I plan to set up a small shop for scratch building.
My question(s) are limitless at this point but maybe the best question is what is the best way to teach myself to use these tools? I do have a bit of experience with the larger version of these same tools and am a decent woodworker. I have purchased a few pieces of wood stock (Swiss Pear, Alaskan Yellow Cedar and Beech) to start practicing and learning with. What do you recommend I do to start out?
Ultimately, I would like to be able to build ships from plans, not kits!
Appreciate your insight!
 
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do you want to create strips for planking? veneer for final planking? grating? small parts to use in ship building? I would first use the tools with scrap to create truly square, dimensioned lumber. You have a diverse set of tooling and you should practice. Start by creating an accurate drawing or plan and then make the parts to fit the drawing. I have the Proxxon mini tablesaw and use it to make my own grates. put them through their paces and see what you can do for accuracy. I personally would start with basswood. See what you think. Also, consider making jigs such as a cutoff sled, featherboards and a taper jig....
 

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do you want to create strips for planking? veneer for final planking? grating? small parts to use in ship building? I would first use the tools with scrap to create truly square, dimensioned lumber. You have a diverse set of tooling and you should practice. Start by creating an accurate drawing or plan and then make the parts to fit the drawing. I have the Proxxon mini tablesaw and use it to make my own grates. put them through their paces and see what you can do for accuracy. I personally would start with basswood. See what you think. Also, consider making jigs such as a cutoff sled, featherboards and a taper jig....
I, obviously, have a lot to learn!
The grating picture I get...
What am I looking at that is sitting on your table saw?
I like the basswood and working from some plans or ideas that are written out. I'll get started with that! I'll need to order some basswood as I don't want to use my expensive wood for practicing.
If you don't mind, keep feeding me thoughts and lessons!
I have a lot on my plate right now but am retiring in 3 months and will have lots of time then!
Thanks Philski!
 
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The thing sitting on the saw is a crosscut sled. It makes cutting square crosscuts easier. And this one has a key that makes cutting notches for grating pieces repeatable. A lot like machining finger joints. I retired from engineering in 2012.....
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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something to consider a Byrnes table saw 18 inch table and a thickness sander is about $1,120 + shipping

sander is not power feed and you still need a scroll saw or band saw

for the same price you can get a 9 inch bandsaw and a 16 inch power fed thickness sander and get 10 times more machine for the buck.

it comes down to how much model building do you expect to do and is the power tool investment worth the price compared to just buying milled wood.
 
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The thing sitting on the saw is a crosscut sled. It makes cutting square crosscuts easier. And this one has a key that makes cutting notches for grating pieces repeatable. A lot like machining finger joints. I retired from engineering in 2012.....
Got it. How is it attached to the table?
I assume it slides across the table as you make cuts?
 
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Rule number 1 Take a real close look at the blade every time you go to use saw. Remember how deadly it looks. Imprint that in your brain.
Number 2 Count your fingers before and after using the saw.
 
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Rule number 1 Take a real close look at the blade every time you go to use saw. Remember how deadly it looks. Imprint that in your brain.
Number 2 Count your fingers before and after using the saw.
I've had enough experience to know these rules VERY well!
Thanks Don!
How's the Discovery coming along?
 
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I've pretty much decided on one of the 9 in. band saws for starters. I'll go down to Home Depot and Lowes, check out what they have, but I suspect I'll end up having to order something online because stores here in Hawaii don't stock a lot of specialty type items like that, and the ones they do stock tend to be higher cost commercial grade equipment.

The wood I ordered showed up yesterday, got some maple, mahogany, cherry, cedar, some birch plywood, and some basswood strips. The tracking on the kit shows it's here on the island, so I'm hoping I'll have that today or tomorrow. I ordered some instructional DVD's with the kit and have downloaded a few pdf's so I'll be in school mode for awhile.

Thanks again to all.
 
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