Canoe

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Is that a Handy Andy Pliers there?

I do not remember the history behind these pliers, how and where I got them from: new or used.
:eek: They might have been Andy's at one point... if I picked them up used, somewhere.
All I know about them now, is that they have been my model building handy pliers for many years :D.
If you know Andy, let him know they are still put to good use these days!!
G.
 
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Handy Andy was a Child’s wood working set. You can see the typical Blue they used on the tools and handles, I still have most of my tools. I replaced the tin box on eBay, but I bought the smaller set by accident. I got mine when I was 4. Now days giving a 4 year old sharp tools would prob get you locked up. Lol.image.jpgimage.jpg
 
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Handy Andy was a Child’s wood working set. I still have most of my tools. I replaced the tin box on eBay, but I bought the smaller set by accident. I got mine when I was 4. Now days giving a 4 year old sharp tools would prob get you locked up. Lol.

Yes, times have changed....

It must be it... and I must have got them from a flea market or garage sale.
Thank you for the bit of history. That is great...
They have always been a bit loose but I have been carrying these around since my days of model boat building when I was located on the Pacific Coast (Vancouver Island in British Columbia), some 38 years ago.
They have been used for all kinds of projects, from replicas of small crafts such as canoes, runabouts, classic sail boats and yachts to large ships that I built as commission work for private collectors back in the days.
A good little tool...
Best regards.
G
 
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So...OK gang...just what is meant by a "group build?" I have followed several different posts about group build ideas and I have come to the conclusion that I do not know what a group build really is all about! Help!
 
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So...OK gang...just what is meant by a "group build?" I have followed several different posts about group build ideas and I have come to the conclusion that I do not know what a group build really is all about! Help!
A group build is a a group project, where participants all take on the same project independently at more less the same time and learn from one another experience as they go. Its a great way to learn, because you can engage with each other in a way that is unique compared to following a build log, or going back and reading other build logs that have been done in the past. Theoretically, everyone is doing the same thing at the same time. Ive made some really good friends along the way with group builds and learned a lot of tricks and tips that I might have otherwise missed.
 
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Well this thread has gone a little off the rails! Ha. I'd rather not see it a purely scratch built project, but I can be convinced.

Should anyone be interested in such project, all that is needed for a kit style build is a BOM (Bill of material) which I have. A set of instruction, which I will have soon (after what I have at this point is updated). From there the lumber is cut to size by a supplier (which there are options for private people to buy from).
No milling your own lumber, but no laser cut parts either, such as cross-sections templates, decks, yoke, seats, paddle: those would have to be cut from patterns included in the instruction.
This type of build is basically a kit: the advantage is that there are better choices than using basswood strips as the builders can order their own lumber to suit their preferences (to a certain extent). Because in the past 4 years, I cannot mill my own lumber anymore, I have used a supplier for all my needs, but it gets expensive because of shipping, etc..... I am also looking at using a local supplier located about a 10-minute walk from my house: the only draw back is the limited type of lumber available so I am also doing some tests with what he can provide. If this works, I may be able to at least cut strips and fully reactivate my "canoe kit venture".

The reason why I have been working on updating my instruction manual in the past few weeks (and still working on it) is because I have changed a few things and methods that I have personally been using for the past few years. The canoe is also larger than the original version: went from 16 to 19+ inches long because the end product is better looking. The shape of the canoe itself is the result of my own idea as to what my models should look like: Inspired by existing canoe models at 1:1 scale.
Anyways, like I said in a previous post, there are options for a ready made / boxed kit, so what I am doing at this point is not that important.
G.

Here is one of my courting canoes under construction.

courting canoe detail 02.jpg

Woven seat and cushion for passenger's comfort on the way to a Sunday afternoon picnic...

courting canoe seat 02.jpg
 
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A group build is a a group project, where participants all take on the same project independently at more less the same time and learn from one another experience as they go. Its a great way to learn, because you can engage with each other in a way that is unique compared to following a build log, or going back and reading other build logs that have been done in the past. Theoretically, everyone is doing the same thing at the same time. Ive made some really good friends along the way with group builds and learned a lot of tricks and tips that I might have otherwise missed.
Thanks! That helps!
 

Uwek

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I'm in on a group build. Gilles, when you get the plans done and or a kit, although that's not too important to me, Let me know how to get a set (or kit).

I really like building small pleasure and working boats, but I've never done a canoe, although I used to own a few. Canoed from Washington Island Wisconsin to Fairport Michigan once. And all the way around Isle Royale National Park.

I built models of the home made rowboats that my grandfather had at his house on the lake. Us grandkids would help him build them, using whatever materials he could get his hands on. Plus, we helped maintain the boats as well, re caulking and painting all the boats every summer (with lead based paint). Maybe thats what's wrong with me.

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O0beYZF.jpg


The last is a modified Midwest kit, but was similar to one grandpa had.

1yTvSlD.jpg


This is a "lightning" sailboat I'm working on now. Just got some more mini wire rope to finish up the rigging from BNA Model in Australia.

Sa0l0TK.jpg


Don't forget to let me know when the plans are ready please. This should be a fun group build.

EJ
 
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wo Bear Mountain kits I just finished. the green one is a small copy of my canoe.
Those are great, the canoe kits are just fantastic arent they. I think so elegant and lovely reprieve from the detail-heavy ships we are more accustomed. They can also be great confidence builders for new modelers who need something "completed" to bolster their commitment to the next project. So many new modelers make the mistake of jumping into VICTORY or some other massive undertaking that they lose interest. One should start with a canoe, graduate to a small boat and then up to a sloop or cutter and then up to a fully rigged ship of the line... but thats just me and my opinion running away with itself.
 

Uwek

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Those are great, the canoe kits are just fantastic arent they. I think so elegant and lovely reprieve from the detail-heavy ships we are more accustomed. They can also be great confidence builders for new modelers who need something "completed" to bolster their commitment to the next project. So many new modelers make the mistake of jumping into VICTORY or some other massive undertaking that they lose interest. One should start with a canoe, graduate to a small boat and then up to a sloop or cutter and then up to a fully rigged ship of the line... but thats just me and my opinion running away with itself.
I agree and have the same opinion - too much modeler started with too much masts and guns - and after some time they stop the project and even disappear from the wonderful hobby we share, underestimating the problems, size, boredom of the same work (make 100 guns or 100 portlids, planking, neverending rigging etc.).
One mast or even no mast like on a canoe
 
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I agree and have the same opinion - too much modeler started with too much masts and guns - and after some time they stop the project and even disappear from the wonderful hobby we share, underestimating the problems, size, boredom of the same work (make 100 guns or 100 portlids, planking, neverending rigging etc.).
One mast or even no mast like on a canoe

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