EJ's Floaty Boaty

Joined
Jul 2, 2020
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Eugene, Oregon
Working on the closure planks, one each side to go. The opening for the last two planks was a tiny bit bigger than two planks.

ZS83Wl3.jpg


BUT, I found a strip that was oversized in one dimension - two fit perfectly. She's closed up.

RVMHFz4.jpg


Then sanding. I find sanding quite therapeutic. Got the exterior sanded in with 100 grit.

gA9vBEh.jpg


Bd994HV.jpg


The one piece stems/flat keel faired in from stem to stem.

NmoNdMJ.jpg


Tomorrow, install the outer gunnels. I'm gonna make them of the redwood to see what they look like. I might use a white wood though. I'll make up my mind tomorrow. I'm gonna make them a bit thinner than 3/32" though. Then, out come the stations and get to work on scraping and sanding the interior. I'm thinking about making the inner floorboard keel strip out of redwood too. I did the "wet look" thing with alcohol just to see the contrast. I like it.

C4o3Rhz.jpg


Boy, that macro setting sure picks up every little zit doesn't it.

EJ
This is looking like it will be an excellent outcome for your efforts! PT-2
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Eugene, Oregon
This is looking like it will be an excellent outcome for your efforts! PT-2
You have done a magnificent string of work step by step and the sanding / finishing should be a great reward. You have set high bar for the rest of us. PT-2
 
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
419
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278

Location
Michigan
I just knew things were going too well. I'm disappointed in myself.

In sanding out the hull, there was a spot about 2"long, a glue joint, that showed glue. I have been using Titebond and tried the glue in the defect/sand it in trick. Well, It apparently doesn't work well with Titebond. After sanding, then drying, and sanding a bit more, it shows up as a dark streak. It really bugged me, so, I tried sanding it out. It just kept getting bigger and worse so I tried scraping the glue out of the joint with the tip of a #11 blade. Well, I wound up with a large wound in the hull.

In my part of the country there are a lot of old time Dutch carpenters and woodworkers. They are also very frugal so nothing gets wasted. If they made slip in the woodwork, they were very skilled at patching it up so it was very nearly invisible. These patches are known as a "Dutchman".

So, I excavated about 1/2 way through the two planks making a recess.

JbHexfo.jpg


Then using my new sander, thinned down a piece of plank, selected for color and carefully fitted it to the mortise and glued in the "Dutchman". I'm not proud of it, but, I hope it won't be too noticeable. If so, I'll paint the boat Old Town green like my old "camper".

I hope it sands out ok.

3uKoqQp.jpg


EJ
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,109
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
I just knew things were going too well. I'm disappointed in myself.

In sanding out the hull, there was a spot about 2"long, a glue joint, that showed glue. I have been using Titebond and tried the glue in the defect/sand it in trick. Well, It apparently doesn't work well with Titebond. After sanding, then drying, and sanding a bit more, it shows up as a dark streak. It really bugged me, so, I tried sanding it out. It just kept getting bigger and worse so I tried scraping the glue out of the joint with the tip of a #11 blade. Well, I wound up with a large wound in the hull.

In my part of the country there are a lot of old time Dutch carpenters and woodworkers. They are also very frugal so nothing gets wasted. If they made slip in the woodwork, they were very skilled at patching it up so it was very nearly invisible. These patches are known as a "Dutchman".

So, I excavated about 1/2 way through the two planks making a recess.

JbHexfo.jpg


Then using my new sander, thinned down a piece of plank, selected for color and carefully fitted it to the mortise and glued in the "Dutchman". I'm not proud of it, but, I hope it won't be too noticeable. If so, I'll paint the boat Old Town green like my old "camper".

I hope it sands out ok.

3uKoqQp.jpg


EJ
I am sorry to hear and see your problem and patch. You had some great accent strips in the hull. I have not had any problems with the narrow strip gaps using my hypodermic syringe to work the Tightbond Original into the gap, orbitally and lightly sand over it and sometimes with my finger work the sanding dust in a bit more to dry. Almost not visible on light woods but more so with the darker mahogany. I have always been concerned about sanding through. Luckily the only place that happened was at the transition of the stem to the flat bottom where I used a thin 1/4" strip to cover it. Not good but not in a highly visible location. We all have our ghosts in the closet that we know about and most others will not see unless we let the cat out of the bag.
A traditionally painted hull can still look very good. PT-2
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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The dutchman - the fit was really nice. sanded out so I can't even feel it. The top piece can barley be seen, the lower one shows because of the color difference. I thought I had matched the color better, but, well, it is what it is. That's not the first canoe in history that has been patched on the lower bow end.

xSxHHoH.jpg


Now, the gunnels.

EJ
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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The dutchman - the fit was really nice. sanded out so I can't even feel it. The top piece can barley be seen, the lower one shows because of the color difference. I thought I had matched the color better, but, well, it is what it is. That's not the first canoe in history that has been patched on the lower bow end.

xSxHHoH.jpg


Now, the gunnels.

EJ
I hope that you don't take the traditional painted finish but go ahead with a clear one as your presentation and accent strips deserve respect nd the patch is just a canoeing venture ding repair which would not be the first. PT-2
 
Joined
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Messages
419
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Location
Michigan
Earlier I mentioned the new location for our IPMS Model club meetings. I kept forgetting to bring my camera until yesterday. Here are some shots from the West Michigan Aviation Academy. There is a high school program for 2 years focusing on STEM. Then they choose one of two paths, aviation or engineering. Next year there will be a new building next door just for the aviation school, with classrooms, labs, shops, etc. The engineering school goes into mechanical, electronics, computer engineering. The school is at the Gerald R. Ford airport in Grand Rapids.

It is a huge facility.

A classroom

cAPaY57.jpg


The room we meet in for our build-n-show sessions. It is used by the students as a fabrication and assembly area.

m7bNmnE.jpg


Another shot. You can see the large overhead door used for bringing large items in and out. When the weather is nice, we leave the door open.
You can see some stuff the students are building in the background. A helicopter frame and a pair of wings for a fixed wing aircraft.

OpjyBRe.jpg


Images of the student's work. These are going to be actual flying aircraft when finished.

Riveting

RQjut7D.jpg


Beautiful welds in aluminum

NYYKa6x.jpg


3pshyyU.jpg


vlDN65J.jpg


A classroom we use for the raffle and sales

HXO5vsk.jpg


There are model aircraft hanging everywhere, even the hallways

dY9mJyq.jpg


The large meeting room we use for general meetings or for competitions. There is a double sized gym adjacent to this room for model shows and such. The kids are required to do volunteer work, so when we want to set up for something, they come out of the woodwork to help us set up tables, chairs, etc and take it back down and stow it away.

8uvy3JI.jpg


I couldn't get into the engineering labs today, but you should see the machine shops with every machine tool, 3d printer, laser cutter etc you could imagine, computer labs, wow.
And they do not charge us anything for all this. We feel really welcomed here. There is also an RC aircraft club that meets here as well. We are blessed.

EJ
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,109
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
Earlier I mentioned the new location for our IPMS Model club meetings. I kept forgetting to bring my camera until yesterday. Here are some shots from the West Michigan Aviation Academy. There is a high school program for 2 years focusing on STEM. Then they choose one of two paths, aviation or engineering. Next year there will be a new building next door just for the aviation school, with classrooms, labs, shops, etc. The engineering school goes into mechanical, electronics, computer engineering. The school is at the Gerald R. Ford airport in Grand Rapids.

It is a huge facility.

A classroom

cAPaY57.jpg


The room we meet in for our build-n-show sessions. It is used by the students as a fabrication and assembly area.

m7bNmnE.jpg


Another shot. You can see the large overhead door used for bringing large items in and out. When the weather is nice, we leave the door open.
You can see some stuff the students are building in the background. A helicopter frame and a pair of wings for a fixed wing aircraft.

OpjyBRe.jpg


Images of the student's work. These are going to be actual flying aircraft when finished.

Riveting

RQjut7D.jpg


Beautiful welds in aluminum

NYYKa6x.jpg


3pshyyU.jpg


vlDN65J.jpg


A classroom we use for the raffle and sales

HXO5vsk.jpg


There are model aircraft hanging everywhere, even the hallways

dY9mJyq.jpg


The large meeting room we use for general meetings or for competitions. There is a double sized gym adjacent to this room for model shows and such. The kids are required to do volunteer work, so when we want to set up for something, they come out of the woodwork to help us set up tables, chairs, etc and take it back down and stow it away.

8uvy3JI.jpg


I couldn't get into the engineering labs today, but you should see the machine shops with every machine tool, 3d printer, laser cutter etc you could imagine, computer labs, wow.
And they do not charge us anything for all this. We feel really welcomed here. There is also an RC aircraft club that meets here as well. We are blessed.

EJ
Do you engage a certified inspector to "test" the students work for aircraft intended to fly? The overhead models add a great atmosphere and reason for being there. PT-2
 
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
419
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Location
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"I - WE" don't have anything to do with the academics here, except to assist in designing scratch built models or modifying kit models with some of the interested students. I must assume that strict inspections must be done as these will be fully functional, registered and licensed aircraft. Because the school is on the airport grounds, I have to also assume that they have availability of various structural and operational mechanics and inspectors from the various airline staff and FAA staff that work at the airport. The building is just across the internal airport road from the main building and various airline buildings. These kids are also being schooled as pilots too, and will be licensed and permitted at various levels when they graduate.
The new building going up adjacent to this one will contain various fabrication shops and equipment and a much larger assembly area with hangar doors large enough to move completed aircraft directly out to the runway aprons. Will also add much needed space in the existing building when the shops are moved into the new building.

EJ
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,109
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
"I - WE" don't have anything to do with the academics here, except to assist in designing scratch built models or modifying kit models with some of the interested students. I must assume that strict inspections must be done as these will be fully functional, registered and licensed aircraft. Because the school is on the airport grounds, I have to also assume that they have availability of various structural and operational mechanics and inspectors from the various airline staff and FAA staff that work at the airport. The building is just across the internal airport road from the main building and various airline buildings. These kids are also being schooled as pilots too, and will be licensed and permitted at various levels when they graduate.
The new building going up adjacent to this one will contain various fabrication shops and equipment and a much larger assembly area with hangar doors large enough to move completed aircraft directly out to the runway aprons. Will also add much needed space in the existing building when the shops are moved into the new building.

EJ
I did some architectural work some years ago for a community college which had an aviation technology dept. Within that was a "repair to fly" section taking customers aircraft for what was needed and a certified inspection before releasing them back. At the time the department was wanting to be able to take in full size commercial aircraft but I have forgotten the models but do recall that they worked on both reciprocating and jet engines. PT-2
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,109
Points
588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
Earlier I mentioned the new location for our IPMS Model club meetings. I kept forgetting to bring my camera until yesterday. Here are some shots from the West Michigan Aviation Academy. There is a high school program for 2 years focusing on STEM. Then they choose one of two paths, aviation or engineering. Next year there will be a new building next door just for the aviation school, with classrooms, labs, shops, etc. The engineering school goes into mechanical, electronics, computer engineering. The school is at the Gerald R. Ford airport in Grand Rapids.

It is a huge facility.

A classroom

cAPaY57.jpg


The room we meet in for our build-n-show sessions. It is used by the students as a fabrication and assembly area.

m7bNmnE.jpg


Another shot. You can see the large overhead door used for bringing large items in and out. When the weather is nice, we leave the door open.
You can see some stuff the students are building in the background. A helicopter frame and a pair of wings for a fixed wing aircraft.

OpjyBRe.jpg


Images of the student's work. These are going to be actual flying aircraft when finished.

Riveting

RQjut7D.jpg


Beautiful welds in aluminum

NYYKa6x.jpg


3pshyyU.jpg


vlDN65J.jpg


A classroom we use for the raffle and sales

HXO5vsk.jpg


There are model aircraft hanging everywhere, even the hallways

dY9mJyq.jpg


The large meeting room we use for general meetings or for competitions. There is a double sized gym adjacent to this room for model shows and such. The kids are required to do volunteer work, so when we want to set up for something, they come out of the woodwork to help us set up tables, chairs, etc and take it back down and stow it away.

8uvy3JI.jpg


I couldn't get into the engineering labs today, but you should see the machine shops with every machine tool, 3d printer, laser cutter etc you could imagine, computer labs, wow.
And they do not charge us anything for all this. We feel really welcomed here. There is also an RC aircraft club that meets here as well. We are blessed.

EJ
Is that black tubular frame for an Aeronca or Piper? It is begging for a canvas cover I think. My uncle used to take me up in one of his Aronca planes right after WWII when I was a kid and fly around the Great Salt Lake. Got me hooked on flying. PT-2
 
Joined
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Messages
419
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Location
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Is that black tubular frame for an Aeronca or Piper? It is begging for a canvas cover I think. My uncle used to take me up in one of his Aronca planes right after WWII when I was a kid and fly around the Great Salt Lake. Got me hooked on flying. PT-2
It's for a helicopter of some sort.
 
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Messages
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Maybe a gyrocopter but it sure looks like it wants a high wing. It may be the view angle that throws me off. PT-2
How is your canoe finishing out? I have been looking for some photos. Also your diorama for the Lightning that you were finishing this Summer? Both of interest to me. PT-2
 
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